How to Draw Exaggerated Poses
How to Draw Exaggerated Poses
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Figure Drawing Fundamentals

Exaggeration

How to Draw Exaggerated Poses

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How to Draw Exaggerated Poses

9.6K

Exaggerate Some Poses

Try doing the process that I just described from any poses you feel could be more dynamic. I’ve also included a collection of a few photos with 2 versions of the same pose. One rigid and another more dynamic one. Try exaggerating the rigid ones and check your drawing against the dynamic version.

Keep in mind that there are multiple ways of exaggerating something. If you choose to exaggerate in one way, then check it against the dynamic version and it’s different, that doesn’t mean yours is wrong. They could both be right. You chose to exaggerate it one way and the model chose another way. The dynamic pose is just there as a suggestion. But keep in mind that the model can actually feel the pose. Compare yours to it and see if there’s something you like better in the dynamic photo. Is there something you can learn from it?

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nongthimay31797
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elkad
Hi, here are a few exaggerated poses I did (random reference photos because I forgot there's some attached for this assignment whoops). I'm still pretty weak at drawing/visualising imagined poses but this was a great exercise to work on those skills, still a long way to go! Also noticed the first pose is un-blanaced even before exaggeration. Any other critiques would be great, thanks!
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Raja Karmakar
Nice
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Goli sh
Hi everyone! I’ve made a few of these but I thought this was probably the best one, any critiques would be really appreciated! 👀
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elkad
Nice mannequins! Structure is generally pretty good although I think the back could use some more cross contour curves as I'm having difficulty reading which way the rib cage is leaning. I think you need to push the exaggerated pose much, much further to get the most out of this exercise because the exaggeration in your drawings is quite subtle. Try visualising what the 3d forms would look like if the position was pushed further or try copying the pose in front of a mirror and play around with it. Good luck!
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Centrina Tamala
Hello, I’ve only made one so far. I couldn't include her arm because I drew her too big but hopefully the rest is alright. Any critiques and advices would be greatly appreciated.
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Kamilla Vargyas
Wow you are very good! I can't give you critique, since you are ahead of me. I wish the old fb group was still working, so we could get feedback. Ever since it closed it's crickets :(
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opaqueapple
Hi all, I finished the two exaggeration exercise references that Proko put in the video; Any Critiques would be much appreciated
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onigi *pronunce [on-ie-gee]*
This was the most challenging exercise I've ever had. So hard that I almost gave up but it boosted my confidence once I finished. I'm sorry these pieces of paper are all crumpled up. I didn't plan to upload the pics and I once folded the sheets up to put them on my bookshelf. The second exercise was done in digital so looks clear😀. I feel I didn't understand Bean, Robo Bean and Mannequinization training studies enough. I need to do them again after I reach the and of this course once. Any critiques and suggestions are welcomed!
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Sandra Süsser
Did the exaggeration exercise as suggested with gesture / proportion and mannequin / Robo Bean study and then improving on that. I think I could exaggerate even more. It’s a great exercise.
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Grundini
I gave this a go and found the process quite interesting. I wonder how useful it is if I wanted to make a finished drawing of the last pose. At least as long as I don't work digitally I'll have to copy it from the transparent paper to drawing paper. Though I guess it's good for finding believable exaggerated poses nonetheless.
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cathy hayes
I like the third drawing the best, I think because it seems the most dynamic. When I compare it to the original pose it seems a bit exaggerated which proko often recommends. I think your drawing is more dynamic than the actual pose. Just a thought
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Christopher Beaven
I would love to help but I'm not clear on what your asking. Help me out :)
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Martin Dubček
Hey! Exercize of exaggeration from imagination. What do you think?
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Sita Rabeling
First try. Will work on more.
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persona937
hi, i would like some feedback. thanks!
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Sasank Gokaraju
adding to what @octavivs said , exaggeration is good, but it should still hold the essence of the original pose. notice that in the reference , weight is balanced between 2 legs, more inclined on the right . In your drawing the weight is completely on the left leg. This is my take on this pose :
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Octavivs
    You don’t need to exaggerate an exaggeration that much for it to fulfill its purpose (being it to help you understand the form and gesture simultaneously / creative freedom from the literal model). Your exaggeration is probably taking it too far.  Another point of exaggeration is typically to make the weight clearer. So, your exaggeration has taken one of the major c curve gesture (Head to right leg) and just compressed it without properly compensating the rest of the gesture for the weight change. I do see that her leg is further bent, but that’s not enough (I don’t mean bend the leg more. I mean feel out the balance by trying other things as well) . She looks more like she should be balancing on her right foot while her left is in the air. I’ve attached my solutions (without robo-bean).
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real
1yr
Initial sketch and legs on both sketches look amazing, but it seems to me you streched the upper body as if it's made of rubber when you changed the pose
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Nihi Sus
Here's my attempt, I just did 3 figures. I'm unsure if I should do more, I feel like doing this exercise is helpful with getting an intro to drawing figures from imagination but I would want to move forward fast and get more into anatomy as soon as possible. - or should I slow down and work more on this?
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Daniel Mayerhofer, GREAT JOB! ABOUT YOUR QUESTION: I think you're drawing at the level where you can start learning anatomy. I actually moved on to the anatomy course after lesson 6, mannequinization. I had been studying the course an hour a day for over a year, and I felt like I had what I needed. Plus, exaggerating didn't feel like a challange to me, I had already done it a lot in my studies, and drawing from imagintation was something I had already started to play with. I can't give you a clear yes or no if you should move on or not; that's something you'll have to feel yourself. Though I usually take it as a sign to move on when I feel like I'm "full"; I feel like I've got a solid foundation (of course, there is always more to discover, but moving further now is beyond the requirements of the level; it's overkill) If you move on to anatomy and realize that you're missing something fundamental, you can always go back and strengthen the foundation! I hope this was helpful :)
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Pablo Flores
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Jesper Axelsson
Yeah! Great structure!
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Christopher Tju
Finally got through the rest of them, my anatomy is still way off and I probably could've pushed some of these poses farther. Any other suggestions??
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Christopher Tju
This has definitely been the hardest lesson for me so far. I am noticing I don't really understand the forms of the figure, but here are some of my attempts. This exercise is so mentally taxing on me I can only complete at best 1 a day haha.
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Christopher Tju Awesome! The exaggerations and mannequins are great! Keep up the good work! -One piece of advice I received when doing mannequins was to indicate the ground plane, with either perspective lines or cast shadows, so that the figures feel more grounded. Constructing the foot more geometrically also helps with this. -Don't forget about what was taught in the previous lesson about balance. Can you feel how the figure in your 5th image is about to fall to the left (our POV)? Finding the balance can be done technically by finding the center of gravity, but you can also use your intuition, as if you were a kid building a tower with toys. Ask yourself when looking at your drawing: "Will this person fall? What parts do I have to move to make her stable?" and you'll probably get things right I hope this was helpful :)
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Tony Vu
Here's my assignment. I really struggled to imagine the exaggerated versions of each pose, so most of them don't particularly look different from the original. Any feedback on areas I should work on is greatly appreciated. Thanks
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Julia Whitenight
Overall, they're nice exercises, and I do see some progression in each pose. If your main concern is to exaggerate the gesture, my advice would be to start each iteration with 1 or 2 main gesture lines that are more pronounced than the previous (leaving the gesture lines in so you can see when starting the next drawing how much further you need to "push" it), then allow the form to follow that. It feels like you're too aware of the figure, are determined to do it "right," and so are losing the dynamism. The exaggeration you're looking for might mean dispensing with reality and risking going "too far." I drew an example of a single gesture line progression to illustrate my meaning. The last one might look like her back is broken, but it's often useful to push a gesture beyond what you're comfortable with in order to figure out what works best. Keep in mind ... an athletic body IRL is capable of movement and pronounced gesture that can sometimes look unnatural or "over the top."
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Aleksandra Krupskaya
Hello! I've tried the assignment, doing 3 poses from a pose website. I found that not every pose is good for this exercise - seems like a lot of poses can just barely be exaggerated further, and also, it's hard to make an exagerrated pose not look stiff. I'll be grateful for any critique, I'm trying to figure out what to focus on, what to do to improve (in partivular, make the poses less stiff and more realistic)
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Bradwynn Jones
This is a hard exercise and takes a lot of time to do and you did it very well with the step by step. It is true if the pose you are starting with is already an exaggerated pose for the body to be in it would be difficult to push it further. You did the mannequinization well. I think the stiffness comes from the initial gesture sketch and still leaving in too much symmetry in the forms like the legs. Symmetry kills the flow and gesture feel causing a pose to be stiff. Look to create those asymmetrical areas in the flow of the limbs and noticing the asymmetry of the muscles. Here is a gif from Proko showing how to push the asymmetry then draw in the anatomy on top keeping the flow of the limbs in place. Again great work!
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Joey Vandemaele
Hi there, the reason you are having a hard time exaggerating a pose is because when you are focusing on the gesture you are forgetting the form and vice versa, i recommend studying bridgman, it would help if you have knowledge of anatomy before you study him but its not 100% necessary, if you have proko's anatomy course you can just use the 3d models to figure out the muscle shapes with the Bridgman drawings, or just find some 3D models online on the sketchfab website, but if you want a detailed guide on anatomy... Stan's course is probably one of the best ones to get. i drew one of your models to show you what i mean with Bridgman's results. Draw one of Bridgman's drawing, and then close the book and try to draw it yourself without looking, then open the book and compare your work with his and correct it, if you made to many mistakes then retry it after u noted your mistakes. Hope this helps, good luck ;) PS: Use contraposto, make sure the pelvis box and rib cage box are not symmetrical, it makes for interesting poses
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Jahsee Mullings
The poses really look exaggerated than the normal one. I like it keep up the good work 🥇🧨🥇
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DuDung Tak
I realized I never drew a detailed figure before, thus my last stage always looks like a traced contour. For line drawing, where do we put lines? I mean lines don't really exist, its all just shadows. So I find it hard to know when and where to put lines without looking stiff. Is there a general mindset?
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Tristan Ortega
Lines are a grafical representation of value. So you usually use them to delimitate the contours and block in the shadows of the object.
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Lucka
Hi @DuDung Tak. As a little tip. On shading, to do not broke the form and gesture, is useful to follow the rule of "from big to small", to give importance in a hierarchical way to the big, then to the mediums and then to small shapes (that would be the details). In line, try to give a hierachy on the thikness of the line too. It will improve the clarity of what you are drawing. Now, if you try to draw the human body and you only see the simplification in basic forms of it. May be you need some rest. And get comfortable to really abstract gesture drawings. Also, I recommend you to check for line artist like Kim Jung Gi. That is pure line work on anatomy. About the rest, do not get me wrong. I think it is ok until you become able to see those lines. Once you get it. Practice both things. Separately or not it depends on how you feel it. At the end, it requires time. So be calm and go smart. Hope it is useful. Keep up the practice!
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Leon ter Molen
Hi @DuDung Tak ! Nice drawings!! Yesterday there was a livestream on @Proko , in which the artist @David Finch explained a bit on how and why he puts lines in certain places (when he starts inking). It's a brief segment around the 34:00 mark. Here is the link to the livestream: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-_0BPWX6jI Maybe this will help a bit :) Cheers, Leon ps: Not certain whether or not this information will be useful for "construction drawings", but I think it could help.
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quinnthomson
First attempt at pose exaggeration! I feel like I could’ve pushed the pose a little more than I did... what are some tips for pushing the pose just the right amount?
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Liandro
@quinnthomson Very nice job on both attempts!! The second attempt does look more pushed when compared to its original than the first attempt, but I guess the first attempt seems a bit harder to figure out how to exaggerate without losing balance or naturality. I think there are no definitive rules for exaggeration, but the first thing I look for is the line of action: try to push the line of action as far and as intensely as possible without "breaking" the anatomy (unless it's a cartoon, then you can even "break" it sometimes :) ). Another thing I usually try to be attentive to when exaggerating is secondary parts that can gain more energy as the pose becomes exaggerated. For example, in these two poses you tried: . in the first one, maybe the head could bend laterally a bit more as the C-curve gets intensified; maybe the elbows would rise more; perhaps there would be a sense of tension on the hands and fingers; certainly a very visible skin fold on the pinched side; and maybe the knees could bend even more in sharper angles. Sometimes, "getting into the character's mind" helps: is she just stretching? Is she in pain? Is she trying to make something stick on the side of her head? Having a clear idea of what the pose is about usually helps decide what to exaggerate. . the second pose looks pretty cool already! Maybe one thing is that her fingers could be more widely spread, as if that sense of stretch is reaching all the way to their tips. I think I'd also try to draw her right leg with more straight lines so there would be an even clearer statement of stretch and tension. Hope this helps!!
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quinnthomson
Second attempt! I feel like this one went a lot better!
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omarg
Hello! The pose that I chose for this lesson had one of the lower legs foreshortened. I decided not to foreshorten that leg in the exaggerated pose. Should I have kept that bent leg like how it was in the original reference? Thank you!
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Liandro
I like how you exaggerated the bending on the torso, good job! Un-foreshortening the leg does not look "wrong" to me, but it does flatten out the space a little bit - Keeping it foreshortened gives the pose some more spice because it adds depth, so I'd do that if possible.
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Tiger Gayle-Walker
My guess is that you should try to keep it as close to the reference as possible while pushing/exaggerating the pose as far as you can to get the most out of it. So yeah with this pose I'd say keep it in if you can, can't see any reason not to.
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