Gabriel Palma
Gabriel Palma
Mexico
Mike Karcz
Hello. Sometimes I struggle with the pelvis, and how to imagine the pelvis as a box, instead of round disks; like, where would the corners of the box be? I'd love and appreciate some tips on drawing the pelvis as a simplified shape.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
IMO it's very hard to fit the pelvis in a box. The bucket shape is easier/better. The box works for me when the model has muscles. I prefer the bucket when drawing a skelleton. In your drawing, despite of the box, I really like the pelvis you draw inside. It looks very accurate.
Reply
Luke Ng
Here are m hand Assignment submissions. All comments and critiques are greatly appreciated
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
Beautiful hands, great job! I particularly like the skin folds, the way you show muscles and gesture and the shading.
Reply
Gabriel Palma
I think that's the humerus.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Sundjiv
Hi everyone, could someone tell what this line corresponds to please ? I encircle the line in question in red. Is it the musle or a skin fold or something else in your opinion ? Thank you !!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
I agree with @squeen . That's the pectoral muscle. You can't actually see its attachment to the arm in that photo because it inserts in the interior side of the arm.
Reply
Gabriel Palma
I like your drawings. Regarding planes I've found very usefull to draw the asaro head over and over. I think there's an app with a model you can pose. Then, try to find those planes in your references. About cheeckbones, I think you could study the skull and make a ton of skull drawings from reference. I think that getting to know the bone structure helps you to see that through your references. Finally, about shading, I believe that's the same recipe that what I said above (and that's only my opinion). Study the skull and make hundreds of drawings to learn the structure. Study the asaro head and make hundreds of drawings to learn planes. Study basic shading and make a hundreds of excercises (Dorian Iten has an awesome video about shading here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vapw6n6FyU). I think that after practicing a lot of concepts separately, you get to understand them and apply them automatically in your final drawings.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
I'm going to say proportions. If you meassure your figure using the head's height, I think it's a little short. I would also pay attention to the pec, shoulder and bicep of his left arm from a reference or looking at the corresponding proko videos. Abs are also symmetrical and obliques, ribs and serratus might need fixing but I could be wrong. I would definitely compare it against a reference and maybe trace the anatomy over the photo to compare and fix if required.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
What pencil are you using?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
This one was the first portrait drawing book that actually helped me: https://www.amazon.com/How-Draw-Lifelike-Portraits-Photographs/dp/089134635X/ref=sr_1_11?dchild=1&keywords=lee+hammond+drawing&qid=1621462138&sr=8-11 I think there's a newer edition.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
I liked it! The pose looks really natural and that works. I think that perspective is a little off. Check out the legs of the chair.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
Regarding likeness, pay attention to the light area of his face (right side). Trace that shape over the photo and compare it with yours.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabriel Palma
Scott, congratulations for not abandoning your desire to do art. I think that alone, is worth of recognition. As someone already recommended you, go ahead and check the Proko videos on Loomis. However, in my opinion, those ones where there are examples of Loomis heads from actual people are very helpful (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JC2ZppKHCqU). I think it's hard to draw from imagination as we tend to draw things as we believe they are, instead of drawing what we see. Go to google and search for portrait pictures and do the Loomis head for those. Pay attention to the thirds and particularly to the chin, jaw and cheekbones. You're trying to do many things in these studies (like shadowing, face features). I believe you could dedicate some pages to draw some solid Loomis heads from real people and some other to study features (like what you did with those skulls in the second picture). You're already on your way, according to one of your replies to other people in this thread, you're invested in drawing 100 heads (to start). Hope this helps.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Help!
Browse the FAQs or our more detailed Documentation. If you still need help or to contact us for any reason, drop us a line and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible!
Your name
Email
Message