Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
Munich
Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
Not happy with the colouring attempt I made which ruined the work but I did very much enjoy and learnt a lot from the exercise. Working on the little composition sketches turned out to be a pretty exiting job any clue why the images are truncated on top and bottom?
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
Nice sketch and I like very much the bottom to top view. I have two comments 1. the composition is too much around the vertical central axis of the image. The eye comes in from the top centre and goes directly out at the centre bottom. No encouragement to go around the rest of the picture. IIt kind of feels stiff... maybe changing the angle of view to drive the viewers’ eye from top right to bottom left and have a few eye catching details, or playing with sharpness would help guide the viewer around your picture 2. Linked to the previous one, the diving character’s gesture is very stiff, symmetric. It feels as if he would be in a free fall more than in a diving position from the surrounding trees. I would try to bring dynamism to his gesture, break the symmetry
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Yiming Wu
Yes, of course, that means the object is rotated.
cubes
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
correct! My answer to the question was also that both are correct depending on what you want to represent. The simple rule is parallel lines meet at the same vanishing point and all vanishing points are on the horizon which is a virtual horizon at the same height as the observers’ eyes
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
Some exercises I did based on this great course. Any feedback and recommendation is more than welcome
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
just gave a try to the tentacle exercise
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
Dear Marco, thanks for this enlightening lesson. The principals are crystal clear and fully make sense to bring harmony. Any hints you can share on how to port those principles on a media like watercolor? I have not yet tested but feel that if I start with neutrals with watercolor, I may struggle adding the more saturated tones. Am I missing something?
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
A very insightful and didactic set of demos that inspired me and gave me a few directions to improve and vary my approach to shading. As I do mainly pen and ink I am curious to experiment how I will adapt the concepts to this media where stumping and erasing are not part of the game
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
great introduction. My physicist education though was hurt by the mention of exponential fall off. If the light source is lambertian, the intensity distribution follows cosine, not an exponential. Not critical for drawing and the principals remain correct ;-)
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yuri
Asked for help
Hello! I tried to draw the gesture design, not the details.  Can you see it from these? And what should I be more conscious of to improve my drawing? I’m eager to hear your comments and critiques😊
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
Drawing #1: the third drawing works very well for me; I find that the first 2 ones miss a few indications regarding like mouth or nose line to indicate better the position of the head. First and second figure have from my point of view a serious proportion issue with a thorax looking really too short Drawing #2: i guess those are back views of a figure but am not sure. Something on the feet of the first figure leave me with a doubt regarding the positioning; I believe this could be addressed with a volume indication for the calf overlapping the triangle you use to represent the foot 3, 4, and 5 look like you have spent more time and have a different style. They are very nice
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
My 0,2cts: I don't your cylinders that bad. What i would try to avoid on the first drawing is to have the shading pattern not follow the shape of the cylinder; your strokes actually work against the contour lines they should suggest. Drawing number 2 with the pyramid and the cube: a pity that you have the bottom left corner of the pyramid on the edge of the cube; this kind of creates a parasitic effect and goes against the readibility of the respective location in space of the 2 volumes. The shading is also something that you probably want to pay attention to in order that the 2 volumes look as if they would be lit by the same light source(s) which is not the case Drawing number 3: same comment as above - the 2 volumes don't look as if they were lit by the same light source which i believe is not necessarily intentional. The vanishing lines for what i believe is intended to be a cylinder don't match with those of the cube. If your intention was to draw a cone and a cube, fine. If the intention was really to draw a cylinder, then there is an error in the perspective
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