Yiming Wu
Yiming Wu
Chengdu/Xi'an, China
Hi It's yiming here and I draw planes and learning stuff
Yiming Wu
I think you got the shape pretty nicely done. I would probably say the edges doesn't have much variations. The shadow needs to be tighter/sharper when it's closer to the apple. Also the edge of the apple seems to be uniformly sharp, to a point it almost looks like the apple is pasted on top. Try adding a bit stronger reflections of those yellow towards the edge of the apple and it will show as "in context" a bit more. keep up the great work!
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Yiming Wu
Oh hi hi! This is a interesting combination/remix! I think you captured the feature nicely, people should be able to tell that's the elements if they know what you are up to. I don't actually know much about the style choice of yours, I think I do see this kind of more or less free-form look from time to time, but I don't really know what's the incentive behind such stylistic choice? Is it something you learned from someone?
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Yiming Wu
I went and checked Jeff's website and wow I loved those group portraits. They showed a lot of personalities and tension between those people. The idea of which I have never really considered in the designs of my paintings. Maybe it's a good idea to think about it.
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Yiming Wu
I can see those individual ones just from the thumbnail! You have a really good value and color relationship in them. Shapes are bit off than the original pieces but I think this is very well done!
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Yiming Wu
This is looking great!
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Liandro
Hey, @quizzy! I see what you’re going through, and I totally agree with @Yiming Wu - it’s a matter of shifting the mindset about how the work should be done. As Yiming says, a longer piece is almost never done in one sit, so splitting the process into several sessions can be a great idea. Start noticing how your own process works - when you notice you lose focus and the work isn’t flowing well anymore, that can be a good moment to take a break. But that doesn’t mean the work is finished, and that’s fine - after a while (minutes, hours, even days or weeks), it’s good to come back to it with fresh eyes and a rested mind to try to see more clearly what could be improved - then do another work session, then take more breaks as needed, and so on. That’s how most professionals do it. Along with that, try observing how you can break the process down into stages. For example: 1) PREPARATION - Usually, preparation work can come first: develop the idea, draw thumbnails to figure out the composition, research visual reference, maybe do some color studies or separate sketches for specific elements that will be in the piece. 2) ROUGH - Then, based on the thumbnails, doing a larger initial rough sketch might be a good following step. For me, this is usually done very intuitively and loosely, in a way that helps me materialize the idea as best as I can without having to worry too much about techniques or “correctness” just yet. 3) TIE-DOWN - After the rough sketch is done, I find it helpful to do another more careful sketch pass on top, and, this time, it’s all about making adjustments so it looks “technically right”. I give the piece a more analytical eye and try to apply all the techniques I know of to see how I can improve it. In other words, I’ll go over the whole piece again and re-draw it with the specific goal of fixing mistakes, making it better and getting the construction and composition as solid as I can.  4) FINISH - Once you’re happy with how the more careful sketch turned out, you can then start to put into practice your finishing/polishing process - and this could mean different things depending on the style and technique, but since you’re working with painting, it often means rendering. Rendering is usually the longest stage in a painting and, at least in my experience, it can take up to at least half the amount of total hours you’ll put into the piece, or sometimes even more. With some practice, these things combined might help you get to that mindset shift and even start to plan you art pieces as projects, not just sketches. Hope this helps. If you have any questions or would like to discuss this further, just let me know. Best of luck!
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Yiming Wu
Wow you said it so well XD... One thing I kinda do is I don't actually think of them as steps, because I do stuff just in a progressive manner, like even in a portion of the image, I go with big to small and if you get the shape relationship is right, the hierarchy is going to be alright. I think my mentality is more like... just think of the image as distribution of elements on different frequencies (or just visual scales). A piece of music if it's rich, it would have a lot of frequency components, just like an image (Well I'm no where near as good in distributing those shapes LOL), and if you think it that way, you then got huge shapes, medium shapes and tiny shapes, and also you will have nice distributions and it will not be too cluttered or too empty (well my stuff are more leaning towards the empty side, that's what I need to improve now). And this have two benefits, one is you can work on just regions of an image or "on a certain detail level" so you can break and continue any time. The second is that if you distribute those elements well, you don't even need to draw that much, that saves time! :D
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Jared DiPietro
I've been starting to deal with a lot of the same problems. A lot of my focus has been on black and white, or grey scale, pencils and inks. Recently for commissions I've been doing a lot of colour work. I quickly ran into the same problems where my composition worked great in the ink stage, but started to become really shakey with the colours. I've definitely started making the shift to designing my pieces with the colours in mind. A necessary lesson to learn, even for pencillers/inkers because someone's probably going to have to colour it. I'll see if I can find some links, but I read a lot of stuff about perceived brightness and the LAB colour spaces.
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Yiming Wu
Ahh "perceived brightness" this is a huge topic... Be aware, LAB isn't perfect, CIE LAB has very problematic hue shifts especially in blue (Well do some quick google and stuff, if you want to experiment, for digital art, use OK LAB or HSLuv) I think the problem is mostly practice visualizing it in thumbnail stage. Ink with color fills are another topic as well, if you want to have inks to show up well, the fills can't go really dark as well, very problematic... but anyway, keep experimenting XD
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Yiming Wu
Humm I think you could just change the way you think how a piece is done. Do some more "realism" stuff (whatever that means)... Try to get a photo study to as close to the original as possible, if you are impatient after an hour, just do an hour, and get back and do another hour on top of it at the later of the day or the next day. because each time you get back to it you find mistakes and stuff, you can easily fix them. What kind of medium do yo use? If you are using watercolor then probably that's not very good for working too much. Gouache, acrylic or painting digitally could allow you to work over top of existing stuff until you get it right.
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Katey Jensma
Hi @Yiming Wu thank you for this valuable feedback! We are always looking for ways to improve.
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Yiming Wu
Hi there! This new "confirm exit" dialog has already helped me from accidentally closing the posting field. Great job!
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Yiming Wu
Hey there guys... I'm doing some paintings recently and a problem I find is that when doing thumbnails, I often only draw light/shade patterns, so the composition almost always work great in a flat, single-color scene, where basically everything can be treated as some sort of sculpture, and I can add "decals" on top of them as long as they are small and don't break light/dark shapes. But this is not very useful for depicting something more close to real-life, where objects have a lot of different colors and reflectivity. I realized if there's a dark object in the composition, you can't really think of the light/shadow shapes for the composition to work when the object itself is a dark shape, and should be grouped into the "dark region". An example of this would be like this John Brosio painting in the first image attached. If you think of the chicken in light/shadow shapes in white color, the composition would never work the same way as is. I realized this a while ago after I painted the #2 image attached. In there the stuff outside window is basically uniform white, except I tried to darken the road just a bit. It sort of looks weird because everything is the same color, but luckily it works as a whole in composition. Then after this I started doing practices and trying to think also in object color/reflectivity when thinking about light/dark shapes, trying to get that into my thumbnail/composition stages. It's feeling kinda weird, as my imaginative vision is not really vibrant. So I did some explorations like in #3 and #4, where the #3 is a referenced image with my own take on the colored shape designs, and the #4 is a rotated model of some reference images I could find, just to get me comfortable in thinking in shapes that are not in uniform bright color. And today I just finished the #5 image, which I used an old thumbnail and put some darker elements like trees and the road, as well as the clothes that those characters are wearing, It turned out to be much more vibrant than if I don't do that. Though the reflectivity on the clothes still feel a bit out of place, but this is just my initial experiment result, and I think I know better how to use darker colored objects in my composition. I still want to know more about how you guys approach this problem... Do you guys visualize a drawing with light as a main part? Or just as shapes and figure out the lighting condition later to match the shape design you wanted? Thanks guys :D
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Yiming Wu
You've done a great job! I like how you did all the green-yellow hues, a lot bolder than I can manage. Looks like that the aspect ratio of these two images are not quite the same? yours appears to be a bit stretched vertically? also notice the river bank and the path down below, the shape isn't quite there. To me I feel the feeling of "brighter light" is not as much in your study, maybe it's lack of the hue shift towards a bit yellow, especially in the water and the sky line where the atmosphere could scatter light and a lot of times it will shift a bit.
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Yiming Wu
That's quite interesting. In a few years time it should generate more coherent details rather than some noise in those high frequency areas. I'm looking forward to the technology
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Luca Funckner
Asked for help
Here is some sketches of structure on painting. I am not used to go any further because I focus on mayor decisions practice. So, what would you say I could improve till this point? It can be on anything you see related with showing form, it is what I focused on here - including lighting
22.6.2 Front torso flexors
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Yiming Wu
There are looking actually very on point. I think what you could do at the moment is tighten up a little bit and see if you can still hold that energy you have in this loose sketch? You seem to get the shadow pattern quite well, but some places there are some fuzzy areas (hatching? but that could mean the edge treatment). Overall it's good enough. Also, why not simply draw your own pose/character based on the same lighting situation? Then you can verify you understood the structure and deformations.
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Yiming Wu
Ughh I just typed a whole long post preparing to be sent and I clicked esc or something accidentally and then without a prompt the type box disappeared. PLEASE at least make a confirmation dialog (like... not the js one, but an actual "leaving the page" system dialog/warning box) here, or just implement a simple draft/cache thingy... It's so frustrating when it happens. :C Oh and Also, why not make the entire page the file drop area? Every site I've seen uses a very small file drop area, I don't think you need to make it look "nice on the UI". The larger the drop area the more convenient it can be used.
Yiming Wu
Man you are good! Like the skill of yours definitely apply to many things you want to do in commercial art! "zero experience"? Nah you have much more than that. Albeit maybe not much experience in working as an artist, you definitely got the skill that the job needed. I'm an engineer student, I lean my art stuff all by my own (which I kinda wish I have a few more other friends to go along XD). I don't actually think I'll be working in art field because it's really different from creating for oneself and I don't have the mind set yet to allow me working effectively in a job situation. I recognize the snow ball fight picture, I think it's from a proko challenge? :D
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Yiming Wu
I think you did really well on the overall weight of the image and also edge control, so there's nothing really problematic in composition. (Unless you have some reference images we could look at and see where you are headed, then it's easier to spot problems) If I must say what can be improved, I think it would be the background city, especially those inside the arch, it's too busy there and lack of separation with the arch, so it appears to be a bit muddled. Otherwise I'd say good job!
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Yiming Wu
Looks really neat! The pic appears to be a little blurry tho, I think might be some grease on the camera lens? Or maybe you also painted a little bloomy effect? Because around the arm it kinda have that sort of separation, I believe it's the green color of the underpaint? I like this. You also got nice detail distribution. Do you have a reference photo or maybe describe what kind of direction you are headed?
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Yiming Wu
That's quite an elaborate process! What I found in my experience is that doing very tight lines first may eventually become limiting and make it rather hard to fix stuff if something is slightly off, however that also resulted in my paintings often have less details than I intended because I painted everything over, and by the time I finished no sketch is visible XD. Here like the center line of the chest is a bit weird (too much to the left?), And I think that can be traced back to the initial sketch. On digital I think a bit liquify could do the trick but I just find it rather weird to adjust afterwards, it also smudges sharper textures IMO. Overall still nice work!
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Yiming Wu
Yeah exactly... It's quite dumb... Flickr and DeviantArt show full aspect ratio which is more pleasant. One thing though... on web it's actually a bit hard to display the correct aspect ratio for all images and put them so they fill up the horizontal space for each row. It will need a script to specify calculated sizes for all images and when the client window changes size it's gonna need rearranging etc... It's not like there are no existing solutions but I think the devs on artstation are just too lazy to implement that :/ I think the backend of them is wordpress, that might introduce some unnecessary complications but whatever. They could do it so much better.
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Yiming Wu
This is painted from a reference photo right? Because of the depth of field and everything... To me the problem may be the final still looks a bit "smudgy"? Especially around the wing and the leg on the bottom left. From seeing the original size, the sharpest sharp edges are probably still not sharp enough, To me it probably need to be "pixel sharp" kind of sharp, like the hair on the chest and head. What size is the canvas? Because due to pixel anti aliasing, you probably need to go way bigger on the canvas in order to get a very sharp feature. Like those hair, you probably can't get a very clear definition of them because it's already in the subpixel scale. The camera could get away with that it's because it's already like "downscaling photons onto predefined pixels", like you zooming out on a very large piece with clear edge, it still looks sharp even with anti alias, but you can't really achieve that with pixel-level brush. Also, you can use a brush that doesn't have smooth edges at all, so the border will almost be like a pixel art (This also require you to have a generous canvas size). For me if I want to paint a "photo esque" image, I probably need to go much bigger than actual image size need, to allow details to be painted in and not to be smudged. Try 10000px wide and that hair should show quite nicely. Also, this brings the benefit of you being able to emphasize any shape by surround it with a sharper contour or something. They look stylish and it helps to reduce the smudginess when scaled back. From the white shape on the middle body there and the contact area to the yellow and black shapes, it doesn't look sharp, but a reference photo could definitely help in such situation. The light /dark shapes overall on the whole image looks very good now.
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