Drawing ‘Nicolai’

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Drawing ‘Nicolai’

15K
Stan Prokopenko
A portrait from start to finish of Nicolai.
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Nad Sem
First complete portrait. Struggling with shading and wrinkles. Critics and feedback very welcome.
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Nicole Lee
Hello all, I have finished the course awhile ago but try to practice more with other reference photos. Below is my sketch with reference attached. It would be greatly appreciated if someone could provide critiques and feedbacks! Thank you very much!
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Head Reference
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Lesly Farran
love this one! Rough sketch but great values!
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Julia Whitenight
Hi Nicole. Just a couple suggestions: Find some horizontals and verticals in your drawing that line up with major landmarks and see how they compare to the reference image. I think you'll have an easier time finding correct proportions if you make a practice of doing this regularly in the course of building your drawing (to keep you on track and prevent you realizing after everything's done that stuff isn't right). I know that's not the same as giving you concrete items to change/alter, but I believe it's better to get someone looking at their work with a fresh eye to find the faults rather than just pointing at things. You've also aged her quite a bit with your handling of the shadows. I know what you were going for around the chin/corner of the jawline, but the details of the shadows turned reflected light into sagging skin. Try backing off a bit and addressing the largest shadow and reflected light shapes rather than trying to find the smaller, more complicated shadow and light forms. I attached your images with reference lines. The vertical blue line is meant to show just how close together the red lines around the eyes are. The green lines are showing which specific shadow edges are creating aging issues.
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nicole critique ref 1
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Zoungy Kligge
Many good things about this, it's a pretty close likeness end I enjoy the way the shadows and core shadows are constructed. The main constructive feedback I would suggest is 1) the perspective is different (horizontal construction lines on the face should tip down left to right, but in yours the features are tipping up). 2) the plane of the temple and side of face between jaw and cheekbone should be darker than forehead and the front of the cheek 3) increase ear size and take some time to observe the inner structures of the ear. Good luck
face
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Marco Sordi
2021/6/13. Good morning. This a fast sketch I made this wee(only lay-in and shadow mapping). Thanks and have a good sunday.
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Bradwynn Jones
really nice lay-in! Check the width of the neck. It looks a bit too thick. Also his ear may be too big or the angle is off a bit. Nice sketch!
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Alexander
Hi all, this is my drawing of Nicolai. I used 2b pencil and black polychromos. I don't think I wrapped the mouth around the tooth cylinder enough, and the eyes may by a touch too small/far apart. The head is elongated too, maybe I'm defaulting to the "standard" loomis proportions? I think I did reasonably well grouping the shadow family on the side of his face, but the shape of the shadow in the nose-eye area could perhaps read better? Can anyone else provide some feedback or critique please?
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João Bogo
The general problem that i see is that you're not modelling enough on the light and you're not think about your values as a whole. I can see you did a good job on the 2 value stage because the thumbnail looks good. The problem is when I zoom in everything in the light looks flat. I would like to you to make a few value studies of this portrait. Try to simplify everything in 5 values (3 light 2 dark). Look for the halftones in the light closer to the shadow because they are the ones that describe better the turning of the form. Also have always in the back of your head the value hierarchy and always question yourself on how can you describe the forms of the nose, mouth eyes...with value. Also try filling your background with a darker value first. You'll help you judge better the values inside the head. About your concerns on proportions, well...the Loomis head is an idealized version of a head. In most cases you're gonna find deviations. The proportions you used are within the human realm of possibilities, problem is that the model has a wider head than average. Whenever you're doing a portrait you have to adapt the loomis proportions to get more likeness. You can also decide to make an idealized head of that person which is fine also, but make that choice consciously. Keep drawing and Best regards.
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James Hicks
Hi all! Here is a self portrait i recently did (no reference photo, as i used a mirror, and all photos didn't capture what i was seeing....). I'll include a few of the progress photos so you can see the steps i took to a finish. Critiques welcome! Personal critique: i went too dark all over, using a charcoal pencil. I've considered lightening some areas up, but I'll just go onto the next project and take what i learned here!
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João Bogo
Looking at your process I don't think you gone too dark, the main problem is that you didn't add enough contrast. I'm guessing you have a light coming at the side and the face are in shadows, but even that is not clear enough. Spend a little more time at the 2-value phase. Really define your light source and then organize your values around it. Also check your proportions. Without the reference I can't tell exactly the problem, but the eyes seem too big and the ear and the bottom third too small. Self portraits are kinda of a pain in the ass to do because you have to maintain the same head pose for all the process, and also maintain the same light (which if you're working with natural light can change very fast). To mitigate this problems try asking someone to take a photo from the point of view of the mirror and use the photo to check your observations every once in a while. And go for smaller sessions at the beginning as you get used to the process. As you get more familiarized with the process you can go for longer efforts. Keep drawing, Best regards
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Marco Sordi
2021/6/4. Hi everyone. Here's my weekly assignment for this section. Thanks in advance for any suggestion or advice. Good night.
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Terrence Tai
Here is my first try of a portrait. I feel like the shadows are exaggerated a bit too much in my drawing. Any comments? Also, this portrait took me around an afternoon to finish. Would you recommend adding a time restrictions (say, a few minutes to half an hour) to a portrait practice so that I'm forced to draw only the most significant aspects of a human face, like in a gesture drawing?
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Terrence, nice study! You actually hit on a key idea in 'drawing only the most significant aspects of the face'. This is crucial in terms of proportion and placement of shapes, but is also a very useful way of thinking when it comes to value arrangement. A good way to begin a painting is by placing only 'the key values'. The photo your working, and a lot of modern photography are leaning towards a high dynamic-range aesthetic. This is a photography term that basically means they expose for both the lights and the shadows, often lessening the contrast between light and shadow. Another way to think of it is the lights are lit, and the shadows are lit as well. This can lead to a very confusing or difficult-to-get-correct value structure when studying. You can paint whatever, however you wish, but personally I don't recommend studying too much from HDR photos, at least before you have a very solid understanding of value arrangement, chiefly light vs shadow. So, coming back to 'the key values' idea. What I do recommend is studying from photos that have a very strong, clear light and shadow breakup, and begin by defining those shapes with 2 values that represent the lit shapes and dark shapes You don't need a lot of values to have a successful painting, you just need to have a good relationship between them. To express this idea more clearly i've attached a frame from an old noir movie. These movies are great to study from to see how to get clarity from light and shadow shapes. There's also a posterized version of the shot, with only 4 values. And look how well it reads! No soft edges, no full value scale. just a good, un-muddied relationship between light and dark. I Also adjusted the levels of your photo reference, and posterized a version as well. Again, only 4 values, but it reads as a complete and satisfying image. This was long-winded, but hopefully it gives you a better idea of what to be looking for in your reference. Keep up the good work!
Noir BW shot
Noir BW posterized
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Matthew Wong
My first take following along Stans demo, I have been learn from Lommis head and hand book and do mostly outlines of prtotraits, I have been gradually trying to learn how to tone or the polygon verson of the human head. It is quite frustrating to get so many wrongs dispite working on this rather slowly (3hrs), proportion is off, lines are not confident, shading mostly following what Stan does, any tips on how to improve? I feel like I should just go back doing quicker protraits study to get the propotion right, while continue to study the plane relationship.
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Richard Petkiewicz
My version of Nicolai
Nicolai
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Liandro
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Trancematica
Here’s my first full portrait. I know I borked the ear, and looking at it I forgot to do more on the eyes. Any feedback is helpful. I have a question about tones though - I had a little trouble as part of the hair in my reference basically blends together with the shadow it casts. In that case, would it be better to deepen the shadow to create more contrast, or let them blend together? Or is it an “it depends” kind of thing? Thanks! @Liandro
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Liandro
@Trancematica Cool! About your question: pretty much everything in art is an "it-depends" kind of thing :D Personally, I think I'd choose to blend the hair and the shadow, because I think it would help create a sense of atmosphere in the drawing, and, assuming your portrait would have the eyes as the focal point (as most portraits do), lowering the contrast in the hair/shadow area would make it easier to direct the viewer's attention to the focal point. But let's say the core idea of your portrait is not so much about the face, but more about the hair itself - in that case, deepening the contrast to show more detail and texture could be the way to go. So it depends! :D I think the main thing is just to be aware of the pros and cons of each possible solution, and then make intentional choices depending on your objective. About your drawing: really great work for your first full portrait ever! The main thing I notice is that there is a subtle symmetry issue on the nose wings, and the nose bridge also looks a little bit misplaced (slightly off to the right of the centerline). A few suggestions concerning the shading: . Overall, I think it's all looking a bit "too gray", so maybe you could explore some lighter halftones. . Perhaps you could simplify the shadow shapes on the hair a bit more (fade the texture into the shadows and let the hair strands be shown more on the halftone areas). . Since there's a big chunk of hair falling on her face, I'd try enhancing the cast shadow there some more, perhaps make it a bit darker and even bigger. Maybe even let the eye fade a bit into the shadow, while keeping the other eye more contrasting for focal point purposes. . For portrait practice, it's tends to be more helpful to use reference with more dramatic lighting. Usually, "magazine-style" portraits tend to have a kind of lighting that enhances the model's face features, but flatten the head planes. Frontal flash lights also tend to do that (which maybe is the case of this reference, based on the highlight on her pupil?) I'd say, ideally, try to prioritize photos that have more pronounced shadow areas - at least while you're still learning the basic stuff, since it helps you better visualize the forms. Finally, I'd suggest adding the shoulders (I don't know, I just feels weird to me that she's drawn only from the neck up...) In this case, especially, the shoulders could help give more context to that cascading hairstyle. Hope this helps!
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Marco Sordi
2021/02/24. Hi everyone. 5 min quick sketches (warm up).
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omarg
10mo
Self portrait with conte crayon. I feel like a learned a lot from this course.
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About instructor
Founder of Proko, artist and teacher of drawing, painting, and anatomy. I try to make my lessons fun and ultra packed with information.