Jesper Axelsson
Jesper Axelsson
Sweden
Aspiring animator and story artist
Samuel Sanjaya
I did some expressions study. I feel like knowing the muscles of the face will help me do this better
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Samuel Sanjaya, nice studies! - I've been trying to learn drawing facial expression for a long time. I too thought that learning the individual muscles of the face would help me do it better, but it didn't help that much. I've been studying the Disney animators a lot recently. There is an awarness of the muscles in their drawings, but they are focusing on the large masses and how they squash and stretch. You need very little detail! Just a few shapes can give a very clear expression. So keep it to just a few shapes, give us a feeling of solidity with a rigid cranium, then have the features squash and stretch on top of it; have all the features affect eachother. I did a paintover explaining this in more detail. It might help to do some studies of facial expressions drawn by a Disney animator. I hope this helps :) Let me know if you have any questions!
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@marq777
egg.
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @marq777, nice studies! Nice job with showing the direction of the light using the terminator and the cast shadow! I'll do my best to help you further :) - The shape of the shading on the egg looks pretty accurate; the terminators wrap around the form of the egg, and the ellipses of the terminators are angled perpendicularly to the light. But those nice shapes lose some of their strength since the tone is filled in a little unevenly. Try drawing an egg again, and this time after having outlined the shapes, try to fill them in with a tone that's as even as possible. To get some differentiation between shading and cast shadow, you could make the cast shadow a slightly darker even tone (remember to outline the cast shadow in the lay-in too😎👍) - What's your art goal? Knowing this might help me guide you better :) Please mention any artists who do the type of work that you want to create yourself! I hope this helps :) Keep up the good work!
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@jcicero09
Hey Guys, here are some of my attempts at this structure exercise. I probably could have simplified a bit more on these. Any critiques are appreciated!
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Jesper Axelsson
Nice studies! - The body of an animal is symmetrical; the left leg for example, is a mirror image of the right leg. If you look at your drawing of the fox for example, and compare the two hind legs, notice how you have given them different volumes --> the legs aren't mirroring eachother. Its left leg is thicker than its right leg, for example. A similar thing happens in the other drawings. Suggested assignment: Make adjustments to your drawings, on a new layer and try to improve the symmetry of the bodies; so that the forms on each side mirror eachother. Keep in mind that this doesn't necessarily mean that the forms have the exact mirrored graphic shape. As a form rotates, the graphic shape changes. - What's your art goal? Knowing this might help me guide you better :) Please mention any artists who do the type of work that you want to create yourself! I hope this helps :) Keep up the good work!
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Patrycja
My first attempt before watching demo. It might be hard to see the lines of the robot girl, partly because of the paper and doing it lightly but also I am sure I did smudge some graphite as well :) Drawing with coloured pencils makes it a bit more visible.
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Patrycja, nice studies! Nice variety of lines, especially in the penguin! - The subjects in your drawings feel a little soft. Maybe you could play with adding more straights in places where you want a sense of structure. Another thing to keep in mind is that curves that appear to be concave on the body, aren't actually concave, but a combination of multiple convex curves or straigths (the body is built with volumes). Of course, drawing a concave line could be a nice stylistic choise, but it might not be a good idea if you're going for a realistic sense of structure. This might be outside the content of the lesson, but I hope you found it useful :)
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Crimson The Vixen
22/2/2024 Hey guys, things looking pretty good here, with @Jesper Axelsson’s challenge, it made me discover my weak point with imagination and viewing the head/hair in different perspectives, while keeping consistency with Proportions. Even though I feel like I’ve known it already, I didn’t realise just how bad it was till I took this challenge. Guess it’s something I’ll have to tackle in the future. Anyway, on the left is the drawing with the Reference. On the Right is purely from imagination.
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Crimson The Vixen, did you see the reply I gave to your other post? https://www.proko.com/s/VsLE There's some tips on an exercise there that I think will really help 😎👍
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Crimson The Vixen
18/2/2024 Hello again! Back with another drawing, but this time with the notion of a challenge provided by @Jesper Axelsson! I’m gonna be taking this challenge 1 step at a time, so I hope you guys enjoy it!
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Crimson The Vixen! I appreaciate that you tried the challenge :) I would encourage you to keep trying it. I'll give some feedback to consider in your next drawing. - I like the shape design in the top left drawing of page two. The shapes are simple, yet have a sense of form, and there's a nice rythm connecting them. One thing I notice is that all your drawings look quite different from the reference of Jane. The shapes don't match. Being able to control the proportions of the shapes is going to be important as you draw from life but also when you draw from imagination. So I would suggest this next assignment: Try drawing Jane again from the same reference. But only do ONE drawing this time. Your goal should be to have a line drawing that's an exact copy of the lines in the reference of Jane. Include everything; even face, neck and clothing. This is to help you see the drawing as a whole. Let's set the time limit to 1 hour (so that you don't get caught drawing it for too long). I would suggest this process: • A light drawing focusing on establishing the major volumes • on top of which you add even smaller shapes • then look at one line at a time and try to make them match the reference. I hope this helps :) Let me know if you have any questions!
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Vin
Asked for help
Assignment 1: eggs
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Vin, nice studies! - When doing studies like these, it might help to draw the rays of light (lightly), as a guide for placing the terminator and cast shadow. Light travels in straight lines, so if you take a point along the terminator edge, then run a straight line through it, that goes in the direction of the light, it will hit the ground where that terminator point's cast shadow is. Repeating this for a few points along the terminator edge can help a lot when establishing the cast shadow edge. Thinking of the direction of light can also help when trying to place the terminator line itself. On a sphere the terminator ellipse will be perpendicular to the direction of the light. It's like it's looking at the light (if the terminator line was an animated character XD) I hope this helps :) Let me know if you have any questions!
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Waner Hoogleiter
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Waner Hoogleiter, cool studies! - What is your art goal? Knowing that might help me guide you better. What type of work do you want to create? Please mention a few works of art by artists that you admire, that is the type of work that you want to create! - How was your drawing process when making these? A common approach is to work big to small. Focusing first on what's most essential, and only after that's established the details are put in. For someone aiming to be optically accurate, that might be by starting with a lay-in with straight lines, enveloping the overall shape of the subject, and marking out the proportions. For an animator it might be to start with a sketch focusing on the expression, on top of which the major shapes are then drawn. For a renaissance artist, it might be to start with a rhythmical line, that is then wrapped in the major forms. The proportions in your drawing don't match the reference. In the fifth drawing for example, the hand is longer than the entire lower arm. But in the reference, the lower arm is longer than the hand. Capturing proportions like this is what I would recommend focusing on in your next drawing.  Suggested assignment: Draw from one of the references again. Start by focusing on primary shapes and on getting their proportions right, similar to how I did it in the image I've attached. When you're happy with the primary shapes, go to the next level, and establish the secondary shapes. Avoid getting caught up in detail that isn't relevant to the current step. Then keep on breaking it down like this if you'd like, until you're satisfied with the amount of detail. I think I would recommend being in an "adjustment mindset"; expecting things to not be accurate right away. Try to be decisive with your line, but put them down without too much hesitation. Then paus and take a moment to compare your drawing to the reference. Look and see if you can find anything that's off. Then make adjustments. I hope this helps :) Let me know if you have any questions!
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Sarvesh Gupta
My attempt before following example
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Sarvesh Gupta, nice drawing! - I might have asked this before, but what was your art goal again? What type of work do you want to create? Please mention a few works of art by artists that you admire, that is the type of work that you want to create! Cheers!
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Tom Simpson
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Jesper Axelsson
Nice!
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Jack Mills
this is my first attempt at drawing balanced poses.
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Jack Mills, nice drawings! - What are your art goals? Knowing this might help me guide you better. What type of work do you want to create? Feel free to mention any art by artists that you admire, that is the type of work that you want to create yourself. Cheers!
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IloveYelloplace12 ILoveTobi&Chesi&Gloombert
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Ilovemommylonglegs12 IdrawAnime, nice drawing! - I'd love to hear your own thoughts. What do you like most about the drawing? What did you find hard to draw? What would you like to learn to draw? - Here are two images: Stich https://64.media.tumblr.com/42602e63b5943873e21efbf5aff5a3f1/tumblr_ps9pnl8WI81qetpbso2_1280.png Kiki https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/54fc8146e4b02a22841f4df7/1628241948784-9GTU403NK3K8YQ8Y0FSF/Art_of_Kikis_Delivery_Service_90.jpeg?format=1000w Notice how simple the sketches are. Details are grouped into large shapes. Maybe you could try this in your next drawing. I hope this helps :) Let me know if you have any questions!
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Ian McNeill
Night 3 - 40 Drawings. Twenty 1 min sketches Twenty 2 min sketches Total time: 1hr Would do more but have had a long day. Looking forward to continuing. It got a bit easier to visualize after reading more of Steve Huston's figure drawing book. Any word of encouragement are appreciated!
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Ian McNeill, nice rhythms! - What's your art goal? What type of work do you want to create? Knowing this might help me guide you better? Feel free to mention a few works of art by artists that you admire, that is the type of work that you want to create yourself. Cheers!
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Crimson The Vixen
16/2/2024 Classic Double Spread for today, I hope you guys enjoy this one!
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Crimson The Vixen, you might benefit from doing some studies of how an animator approaches drawing hair. Maybe it could be interesting to do some studies of Jane from Disney's Tarzan (1999). She has about the same haircut as the girl in your reference photo. Notice how the animators group Jane's hair into larger shapes. Here's a challenge: Copy some drawings of Jane's head and hair by the Disney animators. Then try to pose her head into a new angle from imagination. Compare your drawing to the Disney animators' drawings. Look back and forth. Has the shapes deformed in your drawing? Make adjustments. Try to make it look as if it's still her hair, only in a different angle. I hope this helps :) Let me know if you have any questions!
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Devon D. Yeider
A couple more skeleys
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Devon D. Yeider, cool studies! In your next drawings, I would try two things: 1. Pay closer attention to angles. This could be the angle of a body part, or the angle between two parts/points. When you establish an angle, compare it with the other angles you have. In the bottom drawing for example, there is a certain angle between the feet. The angle between the hands was probably the same in the reference, signaling that they are planted on the same plane in a neutral pose. In your drawing, the angle between the hands is different from the angle between the feet, suggesting that the furthest arm is brought forward, or that the hands are resting on a plane angling down away from us. 2. Establish the major shapes before adding details. Putting a little extra effort into making the foundation solid will bring up the whole drawing and make adding the details more enjoyable. i would suggest this process: - A loose sketch focusing on capturing the expression/gesture of the body. - Establishing the major shapes on top of that; trying to make a desicive design. Think about what you want the shapes to express. It will probably to capture the gesture, the volume and likeness (characteristic shapes where each edge has a clear function --> plane break for example)), that you see in the photo, but you could also redesign things in a way that they don't match the photo, but expresses something that you want to communicate. In this stage you want to maintain or enhance the expression that you had in the inital sketch, while at the same time get the structure and proportions. It's pretty tricky :) Here's some Glen Keane inspo .https://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/508/2740/1600/ariel04.jpg https://i.pinimg.com/originals/d3/2f/2b/d32f2b90e51ff3747b03d114e5abecf1.jpg https://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/1250/2135/1600/page5.png - Then add the details. Be desicive here too. Every line you put down communicates something. I hope this helps :) Let me know if you have any questions!
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Jesper Axelsson
It's very similar to shading light skin tone, only that the local value is darker, so the shading will be darker overall, and the highlights might pop more, due to the higher contrast. I think you'll benefit from practicing value control. There is a video on how to do a value study it in the shading course How to Organize Values. You can get it for free in the Proko Course Sampler. For me juggling five values right away was tricky. I first practiced two value studies, then when I felt comfortable with that I moved to three values, then four, then five. You might want to try the same. If you find it tricky to draw even tones at a desired value, you might want to practice doing a value scale. Cheers!
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @desmond68, nice drawing! Sure, I'll give some feedback on the proportions :) - The torso and head seem a little big. - In your next drawing, pay more attention to the angles. Apart from improving proportion, this will also help you capture the pose better. If you compare the leg, to the right side of the page in the drawing, with the same leg in the photo, they have different angles; in your drawing it leans to the right, instead of the left as it does in the photo. The arm is another example. In the photo the arm is bent into a sharper angle than in your drawing. Imagine striking the pose yourself; first as if you were posing as in your drawing, then as if you were posing as in the photo. Can you feel how bending the arm like in the photo has a different feel to it; more tension and energy. The point with mentioning this is that angles are not only a tool for copying things accurately; they also play a big role in capturing the gesture. You could even adjust the angles to bring more energy into the pose. You could also look for the angle between parts, like the knees for example. In your drawing they allign almost horizontally, whereas in the photo their relationship is oblique. - What are your art goals? What type of work do you want to create? Knowing this might help me guide you better. Do you have any examples of art, by artists that you admire, that is the type of work that you'd want to create yourself? I hope this helps :)
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Peter Tinkler
I did another forearm study, but this time from one of my own references. I thiiiinnnk I've put the muscles in the right place (reference included), but if anyone spots any mistakes, please do let me know. Thanks guys.
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Peter Tinkler, nice study! - In your drawing the anconeus attaches to the ulna, at the lower 1/4 of the width of the arm. But in the photo it's top 1/3 (assuming you didn't change it by intent). - When I trace the photo with Richer's plates as reference, I get slightly different shapes. Compared to the photo your shapes are a little wilder and more full. Just wanted to make you aware if this is unintended. - Try to look more closely for variation and try to get that in your drawing. You tend to repeat similar type of lines; in the upper arm you have the same curve repeating. Take it as a challenge to make every new line different from the ones you have put down. you could play with lenght, how bent the line is, where the peak of the curve is etc. Apart from making the design more dynamic you'll also learn to see more of the variety that nature offers. I hope this helps :) Keep up the good work!
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Olena Salska
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi @Olena Salska, nice drawings! There is nice rhythm and the proportions are pretty good. - What are your art goals? What work do you want to create? Knowing that might help me give more relevant feedback. Feel free to share a few works by artists that you admire, work that is the type that you want to create yourself. - Most of them are missing the feet. I would recommend including them, since they often contact the ground and are important in planting the figure and giving it a sense of weight. - Hands are also really important for the expression. - I'm intrested in animation, so I think a lot about gesture. When you draw the figure focusing on gesture, try to feel the pose in your own body as if were striking it yourself. Feel the weight on your feet, gravity's pull, the side of your torso compressing, the arm stretching etc. As you draw each part of the body, draw it as if it was your own striking that position at that moment. Feel your way through. If you're unsure how to draw a foot, just feel it as if it was your own foot and let the pen crawl on the paper. Put it where you feel the heel, the toes etc. and you might end up with a scribble that captures the overall placement shape and energy of the foot. Think of the figure as actually moving. Feel where it's coming from and where it's going. Like you're animating in your mind. Heinrich Kley is one example of an artist whos drawings feel like they're moving. Having a clear idea of the story of the moment is essential in animation since it drives your drawing choises. It could help to describe the pose with a verb. The character is "looking" at his palm, for example. Then you try to make the whole pose support that. I hope this helps :) Keep up the good work!
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@ollieb137
Here are my animals! I used quite a lot of organic shapes (elongated spheres, sausages, tapered cylinders, cones, boxy shapes) - maybe I should have simplified the shapes of the animals into more geometric shapes i.e. spheres, cylinders and boxes?
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Jesper Axelsson
Cool! Looking great! -What's your art goal? Feel free to share a few works of art by artists that you admire. Make sure its not just any work that you like, but specifically the type of work that you would like to create yourself. Cheers!
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