Dwight
Dwight
Michigan
I try
Arman Jucutan
Hello Proko community, here is my submission for this bean assignment. I am having trouble trying to show twist in my beans so I hope you guys are able to help point that out for me. Any general comments is always welcome! I am also having trouble with making my drawing accuracy, how should I practice being more accurate? does it come with time?
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Dwight
Hello, I think these look pretty good. I say this because I can tell which way the body is leaning or twisting. However, they could be improved. I tried doing some of the references you provided, and I can see your difficulty. Here's what I have to say. 1. I'd avoid bird's eye view perspective right now, and just focus on beans than are level with the camera. Although it is useful, when trying to do them myself, I noticed it's much easier to draw a convincing torso with sharp edges and clear faces as opposed to circles. 2. Work on bending more, as in my #5. In yours, the body looks very straight, which the reference doesn't agree with. And in general, I think that's what your twisting is lacking. All of your beans look very straight, and I'd work on making them less so. By adding more exaggeration, your posing will feel more realistic.
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Dwight
More pen - https://youtu.be/nZ9vpO-V00c. I've been trying to do more pencil shading this week, hence less gesture. Maybe I'll post those, maybe I won't. I'll also attach my digital, although I wanted to get to inking too quickly and lost the gesture - https://youtu.be/5iMi7BEB4jk.
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Bence
Hello! Here is my two and a half week progress. The first three pictures are from two weeks ago, the last three are today's attempts. Not a big progress, but i feel more confident... I think I will move on to the bean lesson while keeping these exercises in my daily warm up routine.
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Dwight
The use of less lines has helped your gesture feel more fluid, as well as more confidence in each stroke -- keep it up!
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Crimson The Kitsune
24/1/2023 My Poses are Awfully Stiff, Any pointers I could take? Besides saving space on the paper? Because idk if that works trying to get my shoulder movements flowing.
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Dwight
Hey Crimson, I get it. You probably already know this, but you just have to be aware of it and just keep practicing towards bettering yourself. Of my attached picture, I used your drawings as the reference. The figure on the right is just yours copied, and the left is an exaggeration of it. I like how you've used a lot curved lines, and here I've tried to emulate this in my own attempt. I see that the difference between ours is how I try to "catch" the flow of each limb, or how each curve seems to lead to another one. You've done this well with the raised arm into the stretch of the torso, but the neutral arm and legs need to contain the energy. Exaggerating really pushes me to understand the movement (and therefore energy) of the pose, and so I put it to you as an exercise to help learn this concept. That's just my two cents. Respond if you have questions or disagree. - Dwight
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Dwight
Asked for help
Not my best, but I wanted to post something. My ten minute pose is a little long in the torso, but other than that, give anything to me. Also, I said I wanted to draw bigger, and this time I tried for the longer poses. Did I succeed? And here's the link as usual. https://youtu.be/S7v0UM1Ti0Y
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Dwight
Asked for help
More pen, more me. I can see now that I was focused on structure yesterday, and not as much today. I tried to draw my five minute drawings today (on the right) a little bigger, as I've gotten to used to my normal size's gesture. I try harder tomorrow (as I didn't succeed today), and see where it takes me. I was thinking of Charles Dana Gibson when doing the hatching for the ten minute drawing on the left, so hopefully that comes across. And finally, sorry I keep posting links to the videos, but I don't have time to paste the pictures in due to school starting again. Source: https://youtu.be/TehpctDO7yA, https://youtu.be/kXyLKfFuFNg
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Dwight
Here again. This last week was not it, but today's gestures make me hopeful of a turnaround. Let me know what I can improve on. (Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzEw6ynDkvQ) Side note: I started a new sketchbook, one with recycled paper, and I don't really like it. It's slightly tinted brown which I don't really care about, but it's weight is slightly less than my previous, and so I can't draw on both sides of the pages (you can see my previous drawings through it, even with pencil). In addition, it has a tooth that seems to eat at my pencil so much that I sharpen it every couple of pages compared to rarely before. Well I guess it's better to know than not :/
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Ciaran Meehan
Wanting to get back into drawing after a long slump from it. Rewatched the gesture video and it does say to try some yourself before you watch Stan's examples. So here are some that I tried. I don't know if I went into too much detail or not. There are some where I really struggled with the legs. The 4th one, I just had no idea what I was doing and redid it a couple of times. Sometimes it feels like the gesture of the leg goes against the actual shape of it, so that throws me off. I also admit that I did not time these, they were probably somewhere between 2 and 5 minutes each but could have been longer. But here's my first batch and I'm sure I'll do many, many more.
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Dwight
Hello, I think these are pretty good starting points in your gesture journey. If you'd like to "level up", I'd try pushing or exaggerating the the poses more. If you look at your drawings vs the reference, you'll see that yours are much more upright than the photo. And while this keep them balanced, it doesn't show the movement of the figure. I've attached my attempts, see if you agree with me or not. Notice how I don't have time to really contour until the five minute pose, something you recognizes in your drawings as a little premature. In short: those light, initial lines I see need to bend and flow more, so that when you build your structure around them you can keep the movement going. As to the legs, I fully understand. The thing that I've done in my drawings is to follow Mike Mattesi's way of drawing legs. There's a ton of videos of Mike here on Proko, and I think he talks about legs (or at least shows how he draws them) in every video. Let me know if you'd like more clarification. - Dwight
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Mohamed Elgharbawy
Hello Everyone! These are some of the first gestures I've made with this course. I made 10 2min gesture drawings and 15 30-second gesture drawings. I am a total blank slate when it comes to figure drawing so any feedback on my work would be very much appreciated. Please don't hold back I want to improve!
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Dwight
Hello, just a quick thing: I'd use more curved lines to help make you're gestures more flow-y. I mean, first and foremost, your drawings are readable, meaning I understand what each figure is doing - this is most important. But if you want to elevate your gesture, try perhaps to only use curves. This is an extreme case, but fun to try out. And finally, just a tip about curved lines: don't draw them symmetrical. This took me a long time to figure out, but you don't want your curves to be perfect. I hope to see more posts :) Edit: I see upon closer inspection that you indeed are using curves, but I'd go even curvier, and watch out for symmetric curves.
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clownseuche
The progress so far. I did some 2 minute sketches the last two days but I'm still torn. But I think on some poses I've hit the motion a bit so that's a step in the right direction. I need to do something else now because I'm feeling a bit burned out on 30 second and 2 minute poses.
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Dwight
Hey Clownseuche, just an idea I got from Line-of-action, but I change the time for each pose as I progress. My favorite is a 30 minute total, where the first 10 poses are thirty seconds, the next 5 are one minute, then 2 poses five minutes each, and the final is ten minutes. This breaks up the monotony and lets you warm up so that your ten minute drawing looks good. As to a critique, 2 minute drawings are what I struggle with most, so I'm not the best person for this. Keep it up!
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Dwight
Asked for help
I'm back! I was recommended to zoom in a lot on a big canvas for digital, and I think it worked! I can now fit my 30 minute gestures on one page which is a lot less work to post. This week hasn't been that good for me drawing-wise, as my shading I did this week turned out subpar and my gesture drawings have become a contour fest. Hopefully I'll do better next week, and have something better to post.
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opaqueapple
Hi all, I finished another figure drawing. Since i got recommended to do a value comp to figure out initial values, i did a quick sketch of the figure (1st image) - I dont exactly know if i approached it like a 'value comp'. the second image is my final. This is my final figure drawing for this course specifically! The course was a lot of fun & I learned a ton. Thanks to all the people who kindly gave me critiques & Pushed me just that bit more to improve & Thanks Proko for putting this course together :D As far as that, Any critiques as usual would be much appreciated, Thanks!
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Dwight
Hey Apple, not really a shading critique because I like your shading, but I really think you should spend a bit more time on proportion. Trust me, proportion is my least favorite part of drawing, but it really makes your drawing feel more cohesive if done correctly. In most drawings I do, about one 1/3 of my time spent is just on proportion because of it's importance (and my lack of intuitive proportion). Now there's a ton of ways to measure proportion, and many videos are here on Proko about it, so I won't relate what I do here (unless you'd like me to). A good exercise is to compare your reference to your drawing and see what things you tend to make bigger or smaller, and remember that next time you go into a longer drawing. But yeah, in case you forgot, I've been following you for a bit because I really like seeing your progress, and I hope you'll continue to grow as fast as you are now. - Dwight
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Dwight
Hey, I'm back with more pen drawings. I've temporarily fazed out of gesture, and wanted to do some fountain pen drawings. The last two of the attached pictures had underdrawings, and the first was straight to pen. Some things to consider: 1. The references. The last picture (labelled 35cd6ac) isn't a good reference, as the light is very soft. I had to darken some values to add form. And also yes, the reference is cut off, hence the vague shading on that leg. 2. The terminator. For the first picture, I just straight drew the separation of dark and light, then coloring book-ed the shadow in. Now, I've tried doing this in conjunction with hatching, but I'm not skilled enough yet to do that. And so the other way is almost no terminator lines and opt for all hatching. I say almost because I would draw it if there's an especially hard turn of form, but for the most part I tried to express depth with just line weight and spacing. 3. Hair. I think the hair looks fine by itself, but detracts from the hatching method as it seems too messy. I'm not at the point of composition, but it seems to lead the eye to the hair and head, which isn't necessarily my desired focal point. 4. Scared shading. In a previous post about hatching, Steve let me know that line spacing and line overlap create darker values, and in these drawings I didn't make use of that. My excuse is that I wanted these to turn out okay, and was worried that darkening values would lead to a messy hatching. Regardless, my value range is really small, and I'm going to try to have a large one in the future. That's it for now, let me know of anything wrong in my drawings. - Dwight
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Samuel Parker
I think I’m starting to understand the bucket and ribcage, breaking it down into more structural volumes like cubes and rectangles is helpful.
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Dwight
Hello, just a quick thing that I've seen almost everyone do when completing this assignment - your lumbar section is too long. I think Stan says it in the critique video, but there should be exactly a fist size gap between the bottom of the ribs and the top of the pelvis, as you can grab that portion of muscle with your hands. Of course there'll be people with slightly longer and shorter gaps, and this only applies if figure is not bending, but that should help you with proportion. Keep it up! - Dwight
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Eric Simon
Day 1 of the course, and just started drawing about a month ago. I'm having a difficult time locating the chin in space. It makes sense how to divide the face into thirds vertically, but creating the frontal plane of the face - from brow to chin - is giving me a hard time. My chins always seems to distort the plane. Is there a methodological/geometric approach to this, or is it just trial and error?
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Dwight
Hello, I just wanted to chime in here. I think there's two approaches here: short term and long term. Long term would be to fully understand forms (such as a box, cylinder, and ball), understand perspective (how parallel lines converge, constructing believable forms from imagination) and then to apply these to complex forms such as the simplified head shape. This, of course, is much better for your artistic health, but like all healthy things, hard endure with out a little bit of sugar :). Short term (and the one I did) would be to draw the simplified head until you know when the lines look wrong, and use this knowledge correct yourself. You'll start to pick up on perspective and all of that, but your foundation will be shaky. You'd have to repeat this concept with all new objects you learn to draw, and probably waste more time this way. However, this method is much more fun, and kept me motivated where as vanishing points and horizon lines would've made me loose interest. At least that's how I see it. I think motivation is the most important thing, and so that's what I prioritize. You can't draw if you don't feel like it. But let me know what you think. - Dwight
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Dwight
Asked for help
You won't believe it but I'm doing MORE gesture! Ever since I got that fountain pen I've stopped learning anatomy for now and am just chasing after Vilppu's way of drawing. I tried some digital today and MAN is it hard to make good looking 30 second gestures. I keep zooming out because I always make my figure's heads so big. Any ideas on how to fit all ten 30 second ones on one page? As usually, feel free to critique or question anything that's not ordinary.
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Castil Clark
My attempt at some of the assignment poses. I've already added my own notes and critique, but any further critique is welcome.
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Dwight
Hello Castil, I'd agree that your structure underneath isn't the best, and if I were you, I'd go back and redo the spine/ribcage assignments to really know your stuff. I won't look focus on the forms of each piece (your ribcage shape looks really good), but more of it's relation with other parts of the skeleton. Focus on getting proportion correct before moving onto more fun things such as muscles (or breasts). In addition, I'd recommend gesture drawings in tandem with anatomy. Stan always says that when we draw anatomy, we stiffen the flow of the figure. I know it's hard to bounce between gesture and anatomy, but the earlier you start the easier it we be. And there's another quote I really like (sorry I forgot who I'm quoting): we learn anatomy to make our figures more believable, not to draw every muscle. In other words, shape the anatomy to follow the gesture, not the other way around. Lastly, line quality. In Stan's "How to Hold and Control Your Pencil" or Mike's "How Asymmetry and Anatomy Go Hand in Hand" (both here on Proko) videos, both talk about how hairy lines take away from the feeling of a drawing. I understand that how to hold your pencil doesn't apply to digital, but the idea of controlling your line type is still relevant. That's about all for now, I hope I don't discourage you from drawing, I just don't want you to take as long as I did to figure these things out (I don't post much so had to figure it out by myself). And although I'm not that good at digital, I'll post my digital gesture drawings I did today in case you want to see where I'm at. - Dwight
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Dwight
Asked for help
Hey guys, I have some more pen gesture, all of it being 1 minute. I really struggle with 1 minute poses, so I here I've tried to face it head on. I believe most of it is from either https://youtu.be/NujN1ZfhwDc or https://youtu.be/hzLO5vehWLs. Anyway, I got this fountain pen for Christmas (which are different than dip pens I guess) and wanted to try it out. Am I focusing too much on contours? Should I focus more on line weight? Comments are always welcome.
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Dwight
Hey tbrown, I understand your frustration. I've recently been infatuated by Vilppu's figure drawing as well. It ALWAYS humbles me to know just how far I have to go, but at the same time, keep in mind that he's a master and you're a student. You forget that he's been drawing for probably 6 times as long as you have, so don't beat yourself up over not becoming great overnight. What's funny is that Vilppu made me want to try pen gesture as well, only it happened last week. And at the risk of overstepping my bounds by critiquing someone who may be better than me, but I'd recommend that you stick with pencil / undo-able mediums for now. I say this because, as you correctly identify yourself, proportion is a struggle for you (and me). To be more specific, you're standing poses are relatively fine, but when foreshortened or near the edge of the page, they get wonky. I've had this same problem, and I don't really have any advice except to be aware of it and try not to do it. And as a side note, I remember in one of Vilppu's figure drawing demos that he only uses cross contours when the form is going away or towards us in space. Another thing I've noticed is balance. If you were to try and replicate some poses you've drawn in real life, you may find it hard to stay in that position due to being off balance. And compounding on that, I've noticed Vilppu will exaggerate where the weight of the figure is being place, to show a grounded figure. Notice in your Vilppu picture how if the weight of a figure is on one leg, the pelvis is pushed up on that leg. If the weight rests on an arm, that shoulder is elevated. When you take into account where the weight is placed, I think you'll be one step closer to where you want to be. My final point is under the big umbrella of shape design. Now, I hate when instructors just say, "design better shapes!" and move on, so allow me to explain. Look at Vilppu's drawings not as figures but as lines. Notice how none of his lines are symmetrical. I know it's hard to break from this idea, but a video that helped me is Mike's Force Drawing here on Proko (I believe it's this one, but all of them are good https://www.proko.com/s/z6sT). Although I don't use the force method, I like his way of explaining things. Lastly, I've posted my pen drawings so if you'd like, you can critique me :) - Dwight
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Dwight
Asked for help
I'd highly recommend (when sufficiently comfortable with whatever else) to try pen and charcoal gesture. The (almost) inability to erase makes you much more conscience of each stroke. Also, you're just naturally faster. Anyway, take a peak, let me know.
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