Tsotne Shonia
Tsotne Shonia
Belgium
Tsotne Shonia
Interesting process. I've seen similar ones float around on the web, and I enjoyed having your take on it. I'm eager for what will come next >:D Here's my submission. I followed the process fairly closely but didn't spend too much time on the final painting pass, except maybe on the face. In fact I'm surprised how far this got, considering it took me only about 3 hours
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Tsotne Shonia
Yo! I tried my best, but I know very little about environments. I'm looking forward to the feedback to know what can I do to improve. I willingly deviated quite a lot from the reference by pushing the colors to something that looks more pleasing to me and simplifying shapes (and changed the ratio of the image). I'm happy with the overall composition and colors, but I feel like the textures and details are lacking. Also, I didn't really understand the lighting setup from the reference, and I think it shows. It doesn't seem to bother me that much, or at least, nowhere near the texture / details thing. The original reference is a photo I found on Pexels from Quang Nguyen Vinh. Along with crediting him I wanted to add a link to his photo : https://www.pexels.com/photo/fast-waterfall-on-mountain-with-lush-trees-6136307/
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Tsotne Shonia
I wanted to specifically practice *painting* abs because I used to struggle a lot with this, so I went quite heavy on the "shading". Here's my submission for this assignment :
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Tsotne Shonia
I know they're meant to be anatomy studies but I couldn't help myself, I had to try and make them pretty line drawings Boobs are too sacred Still learned a lot and had a ton of fun so it's all good I guess :-D
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Tsotne Shonia
Holy crap I am in awe!! I've been wondering forever how illustrators make those painting look so "professional" and nice, and these are like the golden nuggets of knowledge explained in a nice and clear way. I'm getting excited, Imma try all these things as soon as I can. Thanks Jon! :D
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Tsotne Shonia
Hi all. Like most, I struggled a lot with understanding the twisting and the arm attachment of the pecs. Looking for more info on it, I found a biomedical research paper from 2019 that was studying variations in the muscle. It has photos of pecs from real, cleaned cadavers, and a lot of photos of the attachment itself from different views. I will post a link to it here. If this causes an issue, I understand if we have to remove it : https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31061824/ And yes, according to that research paper, it's a little different from what Stan teaches us in the video. From my understanding : (without looking at the photos, this will make no sense) 1. The attachment has 3 layers of roughly the same length overlapping each other. - The clavicular section occupies an entire layer on its own and is separate from the rest. - The rest occupy the other 2 layers, connected by a U-turn at the most distal part of the attachment. 2. There's no difference between the sternal and abdominal sections at the attachment. The "U" turn is formed roughly at 2/3rds of the sternal section, and this is where all the muscle fibers twist. 3. Because of that U turn design and the fact that the clavicular portion is on a layer of its own : - The top of the sternal portion is at the most medial point of the attachment, and the fibers attach in a more and more distal point, until the 2/3rds split. - That "2/3rds" part of the sternal portion is at the bottom of the attachment, starting to form the turn. - From that point, the rest of the fibers go in the opposite direction, from distal to medial, blending the sternal and abdominal portion as if they were the same thing. - The "last fibers" of the abdominal portion thus attach at the most medial spot too, just next to the "first fibers" of the sternal section. 4. On the photo of the 5th assignment exercise, we can see a huge dimple. I think it is not caused by what Stan explains but by tendons. One of the photos showed a muscle that had a tendonous area right at that spot. Which also explains why it only occurs on some people. Anyways, because I had conflicting information, I was confused as to whether I should follow Stan's instructions, or the information I found on the research paper. I ended up doing a mix of both, and so I got a pretty weird result. I'm not pleased with it, but I was worried I'd be thought of as "wrong" if I weren't following Stan's instructions.
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Tsotne Shonia
Thank you! This made me think of a couple of ways I can improve my process. I'll be sure to try them out. I also felt inspired to contribute : An alternative way to select the actual color on a layer with blending mode is to change the sample mode of the color picker tool. The tool needs to have the Sample option to "Current Layer". When that layer is selected, color picking from it will color pick the actual color on the layer, and not the color you see as a result of the blend. Then you can set it back to "All Layers". I use Tool Presets to instantaneously switch from All Layers and Current Layer, and I always have the panel open on a corner of my UI (I also use it for a few other similar things). I find this much faster and more convenient than changing the blending mode of the layer. Also, that plugin seems very useful to me. I might go get it.
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Tsotne Shonia
I have chosen to simplify the bones more than Stan. I don't really intend to ever draw those bones as fnished illustration, but to use the knowledge to draw full characters. It's still a bit of a struggle and I can already tell I'll have to come back to this later but, for now, I'm okay with where I got.
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Tsotne Shonia
For this assignment, I restarted the intermediate painting from scratch because I couldn't finish it on my first try, when the grayscale lesson released, because I got overwhelmed by the clothing folds. I post 3 images : the final painting, the grayscale wip and the base coloring wip. To color the grayscale, I repeated this process (with some variations) on each layer separately (clothes, skin, trim, ...), using clipping masks (and sometimes further targeting with the mask layer) - I mostly used gradient maps to color them so that I could shift the hue and saturation on darker values. I like saturated shadows. - About half the time, I put the gradient map on color blending mode to lessen the effect it has on value. - I almost always then added a curves adjustment layer to boost contrast and experimented with it, moving points more or less randomly to come up with something that looks better - Occasionally I used a color balance adjustment to add some color and saturation This led me to the base coloring wip. From that point, I hand painted more colors to add variations a little bit everywhere, using mostly normal blending mode, and sometimes color blending mode. I'm decently happy with that I got in the end, but it feels somewhat "sterile" and lacks some "pop". I don't know why.
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Tsotne Shonia
I've skipped the torso mucle lessons for now to do the arms and legs bones first. Here's my assignment for the arm bones :
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Tsotne Shonia
You nailed it and said my name just right. I'm impressed, it's an unusual name and it's fairly common that people mispronounce it or something. On top of that I myself am (unwillingly) pretty good at butchering people's names, so it adds a new layer of awkwardness to the challenge of meeting new people. Thank you for all the feedback. I love all the takeaways we get from these critiques and your assignment examples. Regarding my critique, I'll test the suggestions as soon as I get the chance. The issue you highlighted with the hair is a problem I have with some clothing and generally all the stuff that overlap an element that they are also being overlapped by themselves. I hope that this will help with the issue I have when making a selection out of the layer. Because I have to cut out a shape out of another, both layers have their edges... well, edge to edge. Photoshop (and CSP) gets quirky in that situation, often resulting in an ugly 1 pixel line that stands out like crazy. I'm assuming it is because of anti aliasing. Finally, maybe you downloaded those on purpose (which, if it's the case, is not really a big deal) but in case you didn't know, I wanted to mention one more thing. The images that are loaded when clicking on a thumbnail in a comment or assignment post are lower resolution versions of the images that are uploaded. From there, the full image can be opened by clicking on the " ... " button at the top right of the page and then clicking "Open original".
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Tsotne Shonia
This assignment popped up while I was working on a painting trying to sum up everything I learned about art in the past 3 years, so I decided to "merge" both. I did a new painting in greyscale, and using blending modes to color it. I also used blending modes for painting, adjustments, adding a few textures and the effects on the blade. - Textures were added (on the bridge and trees) using overlay - Colors were added with gradient maps with the color blending mode - The effects on the blade were added using the technique Jon showed with Linear Dodge (layer + brush in the mode) - Some details were added using either overlay, multiply or screen (mostly where they had to be used on top of something that had already some shading) This took me 4 weeks and was draining but I'm proud of the result. Altough a lot of the time was "lost" on trying to understand the details of the character, Sekiro. (a lot of small details overlap each other). I also learned a lot by making "bad" decisions during the process and understanding their consequences, which I hope will speed me up for the next paintings. I am posting the finished painting, the "refined" sketch, and the WIP right before I started coloring.
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Tsotne Shonia
I wanted to also include the reference that I used for the pose and lighting so here it is. It is an amazing photo from Sachith Ravishka Kodikara, found on Pexels. I also used a lot more references for the design of the character (and centipede and bridge) to stay accurate, but I don't think it's relevent to post them and don't even know if I have the rights to do it anyways. Should anyone want to check it out, it's (as I mentioned) Sekiro.
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Tsotne Shonia
Thank you for all these insights. I've already said this in another comment but listening to you talking through your thinking when making painting decisions is enlightening and helpful.
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Tsotne Shonia
Here's my submission for the shoulder bones assignment.
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Tsotne Shonia
This was hard. It feels like the rib cage actually changes from person to person quite a fair bit. I tried to correct myself by overlaying my drawings to the reference, but there's a lot that still looks wrong in both pelvises and rib cages. Also, maybe the spine is too thin. I will revisit this assigment after the shoulder bones lesson, I think. I'm considering to try to trace the shapes over the photos to figure out what's going on.
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Tsotne Shonia
This video and the previous one had a lot of insights on how to paint specific things. I don't think I would've ever thought of them on my own. Even though I feel like I know about all these tools (layers, blending modes, brushes ...), I've never really seen someone with experience use them and talk through their thinking like this. You have applied them on so many different materials and solved so many different problems in an elegent and concise way. It was very valuable. There are a lot of things to take away from these 2 videos and I've already seen myself coming back to the previous one to see how you rendered this or that part multiple times. Thank you
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Tsotne Shonia
Hello, here's my submission for this assignment.
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Tsotne Shonia
Hello, here are my submissions for this assignment. I used a boxy volume instead of a bucket for the pelvis
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Tsotne Shonia
Asked for help
Here's my submission for this lesson. The reference is from a free sample pack from Grafit Studio. The painting on the left is the original study, and the middle one is the modified one. The two layer panels screenshot were taken at different times. One of them only has a group called "study", and I took it when I finished the original study. The second one has two groups, the original study group is collapsed (same as in the previous screenshot, except I enlarged the canvas and moved the group to the left) and the middle group is the modified study. The modified study was initially created by duplicating the original one.
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Tsotne Shonia
Here's my submission for the joints simplification :
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