Critique on a Portrait study
7mo
Marta Mayorga
Hi! I did this portrait study of a friend with sanguine and I would like to get some critique.
IMG 20210514 001620 02
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eleftheria_arts
shadows + values - define halftone/core shadow/reflected shadow... on a scale from 0(lightest) to 10(darkest) and adjust them to this portrait; I'd rather be working with simple pensil than colored one. generally u'r obviously in a good direction, what I think is the problem here - values, it'll be much more 3d if u'd define them clearly.
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Oloenpia (Leon Mercx)
the shadows are nicely in place and feel real, but it needs more contrast, for example by making some darker. but really nicely done! you can really see that she is a real human being! (by which I mean that you could feel like the drawing was alive)
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Justyna
For me the whole face looks flat - it needs a little bit more shadowing. And I think that you should work on the eyes. They do not look alive (and you probably forgot about the eyelashes). If you put a more contrast in the area of the eyes, they would become the focal point of the picture. I think that it would make the work better, because at the moment, the most contrasting elements are the background and the hair. Because of that the viewer concetrates on the hair and it kills the atmosphere. So I would darken the pupil (a lot) and the background (a little) and see what happens ;) In a nutshell - the rule is that most important element should have the most contrast in it. I think that it's how it looks in the picture and you draw what you saw, but I would put a little twist to it so that it would look a little bit more artistic ;) But overall I like this work very much. It just need a little bit of refining and it will be great. Now it's just awesome :)
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Lea
7mo
really nice potrait! you can elevate it more by defining the shadows by grouping the shapes and add more value variations to create depth, like at the hair and around her neck. good job on defining the facial features!
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Nanokan
ok i don't tell you whats wrong with it . seems like other people did but i can tell you about what you can improve as an artist and what is saw based on your picture. -Try to be more lose you are way to stiff -Be Calm and don't rush forward to your next step -Measure each step and tell yourselv out loud what to do next. ( many artist suffer on the information part when it comes to drawing so you need to learn how your head things and i think by forcing yourselv to think is better than just traight up do those thing) - Have fun i Hope this helps you out.. looks nice by the way doe.
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Smithies
It looks nice! I think perhaps the line around the face/neck is a bit strong in parts? Maybe this should be more shaded to show areas of darkness (although hard to say without seeing your reference). The shoulders look a little high up and narrow to me, but I can see your shadows and highlights in the face, hair and clothes, and it looks like you've spent lots of time working on the tones, so keep it up!
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Marta Mayorga
Thanks!
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Carlos Pacheco
Hi! as i see, in your portrait you are lacking of some contrast between objects, the color of her sweater and the color of her skin is really close, looking at it from afar, it is hard to distinguish when one thing begins and when another ends, so i suggest that you darken her clothing. It would also help you to get some knowledge on perspective and practice drawing the planes of the face with a mannequin like the Azaro Head, perspective knowledge is important even if you are into fine arts. I hope it helps.
drawing grayscale
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Marta Mayorga
I'll follow your advice, thanks!
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BEN LEE
Hey Marta. I'm sure many have already said so but firstly, this is really beautiful. There is real life in the eyes and a definite sense of the person in this portrait. My main critique would be that there is a lot more depth and light to find in the hair which is currently flattening the image a little too much for me. Hope that's helpful x
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Marta Mayorga
Thanks! Also you're right, I'll do more lightning and value studies
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Denis Jakovljević
Hi, here my critiques: 1. Next time post photo reference 2. It seems to me that proportion is failed, eyes are too high on the head 3. Nose and eyes relationship, I think nose its too small, eyes are too big, but I dont know that beacuse I cant see photo reference 4. Shadows and lights. You didnt separate shadow family from light family, look at Dorian Iten videos on youtube 5. Upper part of ears are invisible, looks off and to small 6. Drawing is flat, try to combine straight lines with curves to get rhythm of drawing. General advice: Work on your proprtion, understanding of shadow and light, and also get Asaro head and study head planes. Try to work more in classical charcoal pencil beacuse this red pencil is for more advanced artist. Have a nice time in drawing and learning! :)
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Marta Mayorga
Thank you so much!! I still have a lot to learn haha
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Abdulazeem siraj
hi great work, what is missing in your drawing is the occlusion shadow and some minor cast shadowsk look here i draw you some of them
dlwmarta img 20210514 001620 02 960x720x1
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Marta Mayorga
Thanks! I now can easily see what I was missing
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Gabriel Kahn
Hey there! Good work on that portrait! I feel like you have a specific expectation of what a certain body part should look like. To combat that I recommend a more shape-based approach. Use shadow shapes to define your forms. Good luck on your journey :)
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Marta Mayorga
Thanks!
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coppe
Good drawing! I think you were trying to go for a realistic approach and I don't know if you were drawing from a live reference or a photo, either way I would recommend you to block out the basic plane changes of the face first and then add detail, that way you think about the features and the shading as one thing. For example I like the effect that the nose's cast shadow creates on the right cheek, blending nicely into the side plane of the face and it would've been nice to see it carried through the rest of the piece, since I'm assuming the light source is coming from the bottom right relative to her face. Lastly I wanna say to try not to leave a lot of white spots on the face since it tends to flatten a piece but you nailed the hair texture. Hope I've been helpful^^
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Marta Mayorga
Yes, that was really helpful! I started from a live reference and finished with a photo, I'll keep practicing
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Bryan Hacohen (Hacob)
I like it. Im not an expert on portraits, but her expressions is well accomplished
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Kristian Nee
Hey Marta! Great study! I can't tell without looking at the reference, but it seems like the likeness is spot on! What I would say stands out to me most is it feels flat. The eyes and nose don't feel like one is further than the other, the hair feels like it doesn't have any form to it, and the neck feels like it's more of a box rather than a cylinder. What I would say is to define a singular light source, and commit to it. It's extremely difficult to create form if you don't know where your light is coming from. @Marco Bucci has a great episode on Proko where he goes through the ins and outs of drawing the head from imagination. He breaks down the planes, and how light falls onto form. Painting the Head from Imagination - Lighting without Reference with Marco Bucci Hope this helps and good luck!
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Juan Gagliardo
That's a great advice, but as @Philipp Meyer pointed out, lighting from imagination may be rather complicated for a beginner. I would recommend this web to reference lighting (that I find easier to use than a physical Asaro Head): http://www.zvork.fr/vls/
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Philipp Meyer
Instead of coming up with a light source yourself, in the beginning I would recommend choosing or creating reference images that have clear light areas and clear shadow areas, as the creation of form from imagination is pretty advanced in my opinion. This applies especially to portraiture, where a good likeness usually is one of the goals. Good reference makes the rendering process much easier and keeps the drawing from feeling flat as Kristian described.
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Marta Mayorga
That was very helpful, thank you very much!!
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Hossein Rezapour
Here are some of my work. The colored one done five years ago and the drawing done today . It’s Richard pryor. And the painting is Vincent del bosque
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Stephen Archibald
I really like this. The only thing that really stands out to me is that I feel you could tighten up the paint job. Currently it feels as if colours are bleeding into one another and some of the forms are becoming lost. If you look at the shadows edge that is underneath the chin it is much sharper than anything else in the image and it's where my eye went to first when first looking at your work.
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Hossein Rezapour
i say try to use less lines and show the volume by shading. Like what you did inside of the face. Give variation to the lines u use. Use line wieght. And break the lines in the areas that u can show by shading. I don’t know if I could explain my thought right. Good luck.
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Marta Mayorga
Thanks!!
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