Liandro
Liandro
Cartoonist and drawing teacher
Vincent Duncombe
Hey @Jesper Axelsson, @Luigi Manese, and @Liandro. So I did the exaggeration example then tried one of my own … with limited success. I tried a few things from imagination as well (see the pages and dates attached). So … here’s the question … I really didn’t find the exercises from imagination (which I’m including the exaggeration exercise as you have to try to imagine an exaggerated pose) … I didn’t find them that inspiring. Even though I did see some improvement over the few I tried. I also found myself trying to hunt for a not so dynamic pose for me to exaggerate passing over many poses that I would have loved to draw because they were interesting … just to find a pose that wasn’t interesting at all. Wait … that wasn’t a question 😆. The question is 😋, how important is drawing from imagination? I heard one of the guests on Proko (Zapata) talk about doing what inspires you instead of trying to do everything. I do think some imagination is necessary when designing the shapes and gesture when drawing from reference, so I know it has some place. But trying to come up with an entire pose … how important is that part if my current goal is to be able to draw from reference? What are your thoughts? I don’t want to skip over getting better at drawing “poses” from imagination if it will affect my goal of thing to get good at drawing from reference. I’ve also included 2 other drawings I’ve done since then … again not uploading all the practice sheets. But drawing these I did find inspiring and exciting. Got carried away with playing with shading. So I have been doing layins and then putting the “real” lines right over that without much erasing. So most if not all those dirty lines you see are not from erasing previous attempts at putting down lines … but from the original straight (sometimes gestured) layin lines. Im heading onto the proportion, measuring and shading lessons next so the next ones should show some improvement instead of me winging it. Was working some on figuring out the heads and hair as well. Thanks as always for your valuable responses and time.
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Liandro
Hey, @Vincent Duncombe! I should say that I don't think your exaggeration studies had limited success - to me, they seem very succesful. You were able to take what you see, understand its structure and change it deliberately to fit an idea you had in mind in a believable way. This is the essence of succesful figurative art. To answer your question directly, I think being able to draw from imagination is SUPER important as a skill for most artists. At some point, most of us face the need to use imagination skills, either because our reference is not ideal and we need to change or adapt a pose, expression or lighting scheme based on what we see, or because we want to come up with visual ideas for an entire fictional world from scratch. On the other hand, it's not because you CAN draw from imagination that you WILL. Sure, there's a big number of artists who pursue drawing from imagination as "THE ultimate skill", but this doesn't have to be true for everyone. Depicting reality as we see can also lead to great artwork. As Vilppu himself has said: "tools, not rules". And choosing which tools we use is really a matter of what we want to do. So if you didn't have that much fun drawing from imagination, that's totally fine. It's great that you have this clear goal of focusing on drawing from reference now. Who knows, maybe, at some point in your journey, you'll naturally find the place to let your imagination dialogue with your observation some more ... or maybe not, maybe you'll prefer to keep working from reference and honing your observation techniques over time. Either path is welcome. I'll stand by Steven Zapata's quote: draw what inspires you. If drawing from observation is what drives you now, I say stick to it as much as you like and as much as it makes sense to you. I'll seize this opportunity to suggest two videos that address topics related to this discussion. In case you haven't seen them, maybe take a look and, if you want, let me know what are your thoughts: . The Reference Sandwich - A Better Way to Use Reference Photos . Drawing WITHOUT Imagination - When You Can't Visualize ANYTHING Hope this helps!
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Audrey Giovanni
Hello @Jesper Axelsson Here is my submission for the gesture drawing, let me know what you think. And @Liandro I'm aware this is what you always lecturing me on, so shoot all the critique (I'm well prepare xD) Thank you beforehand!!
20210614 small gesture proko
20210614 small gesture proko 02
20210614 small gesture proko 3
20210614 small gesture proko 4
20210614 small gesture
20210614 small gesture 2
20210614 small gesture 3
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Liandro
Hey, @Audrey Giovanni, nice job! :) I like that the figures feel "flowy". The more dynamic poses, especially, show a good deal of energy and movement! One thing that popped out to me as an overall trait in your sketches is that some long lines are often looking "broken", and this is especially noticeable in the 30-sec sketches. Breaking down long contours into smaller angles can be really helpful to draw from observation, so it's not that you have to abandon it as a technique altogether; but it's just that, when it comes to focusing on gesture, I'd say you might try looking more for the "big picture" and how the angles flow one into the other (more so than the smaller, individual angles). So, instead of breaking down the long flows into smaller lines, try the opposite: unifying smaller areas intro longer rythmic flow lines. Check out the image I attached for additional visual notes. Another thing that called my attention is that your sketches really highlight the figure's silhouette - which is not an issue per se, but just notice for yourself if, in your mind, you're also keeping an eye on the 3D forms as you work through the gestures. Even when the sketch is so simple, it's still useful that we "think in 3D", noticing volumes, overlaps, form and perspective - even if we don't draw the actual lines that represent the volumes, having this "think-in-3D" mindset usually helps inform the gesture into a more solid and believable way. Other than that, keep it up! Hope this helps.
ag
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Jo Sheridan
Asked for help
OK guys, I've been busy down in the shed with my Oil Paints - I've still not progressed beyond just black and white, but I am having a lot of fun here. Critiques welcome. With my Asaro Head, I tried to match the orientation of the skull to help with the values - i'm not entirely sure how that turned out...@Liandro this is phase two :)
IMG 20210530 150945
female skull 3
Asaro head sq
Two heads
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Liandro
I love it!! How are you handling the material so far? Have you gotten used to the way oils work compared to other media you were more used to before? Also, have you watched any of the courses we talked about? Glad to know you're having fun.
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Jesse Yao
Asked for help
I might as well just be posting every few weeks now seeing how I somehow just don't post every week. On the main post will be my latest assignments, and reply threads to it will just be studies or gesture exercises and stuff like that. I started mannequinization and it (like the landmarks before it) was really scary until I actually started doing it, where it then actually seemed really simple. Here they are (Robo beans, gestures, muscle studies will be on reply threads) Any feedback appreciated! @Liandro @Jesper Axelsson @Diego Lucia
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IMG 1843
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Liandro
@Jesse Yao I really like these mannequin studies! As a suggestion, I'd say you could try to create even more variety in the line weight (you're already getting some): keep the sketchier lines lighter, and darken a bit more the overlapping lines and the lines that add more definition to the figure and the forms - this should help add a touch of clarity and a slightly more refined aesthetics to the sketch. It may sound a bit like cleaning up, although the point is less about having a polished drawing and more about enhancing the clarity of the linework and the construction. I'm attaching a draw-over as an example of what I mean. Overall, great job balancing the solidity of forms plus the curvy rhythms of the gesture. Keep it up!
yao
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Liandro
That's so cool, @Jo Sheridan! I admire that you had the guts to take this first step, it must have been scary, but you made it. I honestly like how your first oil study turned out, I think you did a nice job mixing the paint and blending the tones to convey the lighting. Also love the little charcoal sketch. Especially when we're doing it on our own, like you are, learning to deal with a new tool is always a big challenge (imagine that last week I made a few changes on my Photoshop keyboard shortcuts and I'm still struggling to get used to new keys 😅 let alone learning a whole new medium altogether). So congrats on your milestone, keep it up and please feel free to let us updated on how your journey goes. Best regards!
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Liandro
I think these are really gorgeous sketches, @Thomas Donovan. And even if they were messy and ugly (which they aren't, but still), the sketchbook is the exact place to mess it up. A friend of a guy I knew used to label the cover os his sketchbooks as "book of mistakes" - which I think feels kind of liberating... Also, there's no such thing as "being good enough" to give some constructive feedback, so yes, please engage with the community all you wish and definitely start giving some critiques. I'm sure everyone will appreciate. Thank you!
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Jesper Axelsson
Revisiting the arm bones. Feedback appreciated! When I compared mine to Stan´s I noticed how we placed the radius differently at the wrist. I think mine looks a little weird, but I paid a lot of attention to this area, examined my own wrist; what bumps the muscles and bones form... so I´m going to be bold and say that mine is correct :) What do you think? I´m also conserned about my glenoid cavity placement. I found it by tracking the triceps long head to it´s origin, and I think the humerus is the right length, but I still end up with this gap between the head of the humerus and glenoid cavity. Should it be there? Thanks in advance!
JesperAxelsson Arm Bones Assignment 02
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Liandro
Hey @Jesper Axelsson, great study! One thing that stuns me in your drawings is how careful and sharp you like to be with the anatomy depiction. I'm not sure about your glenoid cavity question, but have you considered maybe enlarging the Scapula a bit? I see you tracked the Lat, and, if I'm not mistaken, it should overlap the very bottom of the Scapula. So, by making the Scapula bigger overall, you might be able to reduce the gap between it and the Humerus. About the Radius, I'm gonna agree with @João Bogo - when I look at that joint as very simple forms, I see the top plane of the forearm aligned with the top plane of the hand. I've also tried pressing my hand against my desk and attempting to move my forearm, but the wrist joint will always stay "locked" - when I tried this motion with my arm bent in a similar way to Laura's pose, I could only move my forearm a bit by using the shoulder joint; and even when I tried it with my arm straightened, the motion was on the elbow. So even though Laura is really super flexible (and strong by the way - that pose she's doing is absurdly difficult, I've dared to try a few times in yoga...), I guess it's anatomically impossible to rotate the forearm inward that much while keeping the hand pointing forward. Which actually makes sense with the The 6 Types of Joints lesson - since the wrist is an ellipsoid joint, it won't allow much for rotation. Hope this helps. Keep up the good work!
flying pidegon
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Liandro
The little leaf you add to cover the "private parts" in some of your sculptures somehow adds an extra touch of fun, haha :D Stunning work, Andrew!
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Lea
hello i just had the time to do this today! so i hope its okay even though I'm a couple days late ^^ i learnt some stuff from the video but i think some parts of my portrait drawing it is still lacking ,I'm not sure what is so im hoping to get a critique! thankyou so much for the livestream and to the proko team!!!
potrait
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Liandro
Hey @Lea, it's cool that you got the time to join this assignment! I think your drawing has a nice form structure overall, simple yet effective. I especially like how you represented the volumes around the eyes and nose. What I assume is the main thing you might be missing is a bit more accuracy in the shape and proportions of the jaw. You drawing shows a squarish jaw that extends lower than the bone structure of the model in the reference - a few tweaks might help you get a stronger degree of likeness. Maybe try using Measuring Techniques to look for the angles and size relationships. You might also try to look out for the value structure - establishing a solid relationship of values is one of the foundations of great shading. @Dorian Iten has very recently released a series of lessons on What Are Values?, maybe you might like to check them out? Finally, in case you haven't, make sure to check out Stan's Portrait Drawing Fundamentals course, especially the lessons on ears, lips and hair - there's some really useful information there. Hope this helps. Best regards!
lea1
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Nanna Skytte
Asked for help
I did this color study today (1,5 hour) My goal is to push myself to work fast while also learning something about colors, structure light and shape design. I think the skin and the hand was hard to do, under such short amount of time. Link to reference photo: https://unsplash.com/photos/BthSqlD2Cso
Screenshot 2021 05 23 at 12.55.43
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Liandro
This is a nicely compelling image, I can think of several stories it could tell. @Nanna Skytte, if you're looking for a challenge, perhaps this is something you could try: change the color palette and see how it affects the mood and the storytelling in the illustration. Maybe you could experiment with a variety of different concepts: colorful, dull, bright, dark, warm, cold... Depending on how comfortable you are with lighting fundamentals, you could also try varying the lighting scheme (hard light, soft light, multiple light sources...) , or maybe vary just the colors themselves for now. Perhaps you could even ignore all the details in the image and work just with very simple thumbnails that allow you to see the "big picture". It's just an idea! :) If you do feel like trying it out, I'll be curious to know how it turns out.
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Liandro
Oh wow, how awesome is this challenge? 🤩
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Jesper Axelsson
I´m very happy with this one :) I found it difficult to design the wrinkles of the thumb´s knuckle. If you have any tips, feel free to share.
Assignments Hands 2
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Liandro
Awesome job, @Jesper Axelsson! Love the angles and shape design! Felt kind of "Bridgman-y" to me. As for the wrinkles, that's something I often find pretty challenging myself, but I'll share some thoughts anyway... I think, since the thumb is stretched and slightly pressuring the object, perhaps simplifying the contour to a straighter line could work fine. And, with that, I'd add a few extra wrinkles with a very subtle suggestion of volume shaping the inner edge of the contour line. I dared to try it - honestly, I'm not 100% satisfied, but that's my best take for today. :) And hey, please let me know what you think!
Captura de Tela 2021 05 21 às 20.03.45
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Newton Llorente
Asked for help
Hello @Stan Prokopenko @Liandro , these are 2-minute gesture drawings I've done for the past couple of days. I feel like they're a bit on the cartoony side and not that realistic/proportional. The way I drew these was by starting with the robo bean and then attaching the limbs.  Do I need to learn anatomy in conjunction with figure drawing to make my drawings look more realistic/proportional? Or should I just focus on figure drawing for now and worry about anatomy further down the line? PS how do I post this as help request under the right video? I can only post as "help request" to my profile and not on the corresponding video.
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Liandro
Hey, @Newton Llorente, nice work! As you keep practicing gesture, keep looking for these flowing, rhythmic curves as you seem to be already. If it helps, try to think of the body as a “flow path”: maybe imagine how water would flow throw it in sort of a “wavy” rhythm, as one curve leads to the other. (See the first image attached) I agree some of the figures got a bit cartoony, but I’d say not all of them. Since these are such simplified sketches, I think the “cartooniness” is coming from the head/body relationship - in other words, if you want to go with a more realistic approach, watch out for the size of the head compared to the body. An average human is about 7 heads and a half tall; when we draw the head bigger than that, it may start to feel cartoony. Of course, the most “guaranteed” way to get accurate proportions is by using Measuring Techniques. But save it for the longer drawings - since these ones are quick sketches and are supposed to be fast and intuitive, you don’t wanna spend time measuring and focusing on accuracy. So here’s a suggestion: keep in mind this “7 and a half” average as a mental reference, but, during your practice, try just eyeballing and going with your gut for how the proportions should be in your quick sketches. Whenever you notice a sketch is looking cartoony and you want it to look more realistic, quickly look for the head size compared with the body and, if it feels necessary, make the adjustments you need. With practice, you’ll slowly train you eye and will be able to spot this kind of thing more confidently. I think there is no problem in starting with the bean and attaching the limbs after, but try to make sure you don’t lose sight of the “big picture”. When practicing gesture, remember to look for the “line of action” and consider the overall flow across the various parts of the figure, not just each area individually. Definitely focus on Figure Drawing first if you want your drawings to be more realistic/proportional. Knowing anatomy is important, but Proko’s Anatomy course can get too complex too fast if you don’t have a nice grip on the basics first. Actually, the Figure course already provides a glimpse of anatomy, since you’ll be studying Landmarks of the Human Body at some point. But the Figure course will show you just enough anatomy for you to be able to solidly develop the skills you’ll need as a foundation. The Anatomy course will then approach the human body in much deeper details and will allow you to get more and more control and skillfulness over your figure drawings, but this should all build upon the knowledge you’ll get from the Figure Course - so, in a way, I guess I’d say the Figure course is somehow a “pre-requisite”. To post your drawings under the respective video, you can post it directly from the site’s home page by choosing where you want that post to be placed (don’t forget to check the “help request” box if you expect someone to give you feedback). Or you can also can go straight to the specific page of whatever the lesson and create a post under the “Assignments” tab, where all posts are help requests by default. (See the second image for visual notes on this) Hope this helps! Let me know if you have other questions. Happy drawing!
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Brian Pardo
Great live stream Stephen and Proko team. I tried to do my best drawing along with Stephen. It was really fun and I really enjoyed it. this is my attempt. I'm happy with the result, although it's not so good.
PORTRAIT CHARCOAL
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Liandro
Hey @Brian Pardo, glad you enjoyed the stream. I like your drawing very much! The anatomy of the facial features feels pretty consistent, and I think the stylization in the proportions, whether intentional or not, conveyed sort of a strong personality to her look. I also like the hair texture quite a lot. One thing you could try when using charcoal or any other softer medium is to keep a small sheet of paper under your hand to protect the drawing from accidental smudges. One more idea would be to use plumb lines or another structural method such as Loomis's or Reilly's to check the measurements and placements in case you want to attempt retaining a stronger likeness with the reference (you can find more about plumb lines in Measuring Techniques; more about the Loomis method in Stan's Portrait Drawing Fundamentals; and more about the Reilly method in Draw Using Reilly Rhythms and in The Abstraction – Reilly Method for Caricature Drawing). Keep it up and please let me know in case you have any questions. Hope this helps!
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aprt2020
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Liandro
@aprt2020 Good to see you completed the assignment! If you'd allow me one suggestion, I'd say try using some plumb lines (verticals, horizontals and diagonals) as @Kristian Nee recomended in other posts here in this section (see image). Plumb lines can really help us better visualize alignments, proportions and angles to establish the placements of each element in the drawing. If you have any questions, feel free to let me know. Hope this helps!
Captura de Tela 2021 05 20 às 18.42.26
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Nanna Skytte
I don't feel that this ons is on point, but i did my best. :)
20210519 144729
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Liandro
@Nanna Skytte I love the linework! I agree with Adam about the ear. For a stonger likeness, I'd say her head would need to be a bit more oval and elongated, especially on the top part. Despite that, I think you managed to build a very solid structure! Awesome job dealing with forms and edges.
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Chris Bodary
Hello! Here is my quick sketch. About 90 minutes.
image
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Liandro
Cool! :D
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Jacek
Hello! Here is my attempt. Hair and ears, my nemesis we'll meet again!
proko
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Liandro
Nice job, @Jacek! The overall construction looks pretty good to me. Indeed, the ear needs more anatomy, but the general proportion and placement are fine! Make sure to check out the lesson on How to Draw Ears – Anatomy and Structure in case you haven't. About the hair, one great thing to be noticed is that, even though there could be more work on the texture, you shaded it very coherently as a 3D mass - I say this is great because it's something a lot of people have trouble with. Stan mentions great tips for drawing hair in How to Draw Hair, in case you haven't seen. Keep it up! And let me know if you have questions. Hope this helps.
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Liandro
Hey @Scott Lewis, this is a really fun drawing! I'm sorry about Marlow, he seem to have been an amazing pet! It seems to me that a dog who loves water is a rare thing, haha. I like the linework and the hatch-style shading, and you seem to be having a good grip on the overall representation of form. I'd just like to add a bit to the comments that were already made regarding how to push the gesture. One main thing to look for is the line of action: try to think of one single line as the simplest way to represent this action, then build your drawing out from there. You might wanna consider the energy involving in that acttion: which is the direction of the movement? The speed? Where are the tensed and relaxed parts of the body? Is there any resistance such as air, gravity or some impairing force? You might also wanna imbue some of the character's personality into the action: how does he run? Not just any random run, but "Marlow's run". How does he feel when running? What body traits and mannerisms (including facial expressions) might stand out with that feeling as he performs that action? Getting clarity on these kinds of questions can really help inform gesture and character design. Over time and practice, using these guidances to think of solutions kind of becomes intuitive. To me, I see two major paths for enhancing the gesture in this case: push the whole body forward to state the direction and energy of the action; or puff just the chest out and curve everything else backwards, which could look a bit goofier and "cartoonier". I did a couple of sketches as visual notes on these possibilities (I didn't consider the drawing style too much, so I sketched in a way that felt natural to me, but hopefully it gets the point across so you can adapt the main idea to your own drawing style). Let me know if this helps! Best regards.
scott
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grytova
Thank you for the stream a lot. This is the longest portrait I've ever done. I usually go for 10-30 minute face studies because I thought that will broaden my visual library better, now I see it's not always the case. Critique is welcome I am not really comfortable with value.
Bauman livestream assignment
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Liandro
@grytova I think it looks really beautiful. Line quality is great, and I like the hair texture a lot. Reducing the distance between the mouth and the chin might help attain a stronger likeness with the reference, indeed. Her left eye (the one farther behind) also looks a tiny bit too high, especially on the inner corner - just a very small adjustment needed perhaps. Other than that, great job!
Captura de Tela 2021 05 18 às 20.59.03
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