Liandro
Liandro
I draw cartoons and teach about art, design and creativity.
Jesper Axelsson
Hi @punchyengland, hmm... strange... I'll forward this to the team 👍 In the meantime, have you tried searching for solutions to this issue, maybe typing something like "fix vimeo videos won't show play button google chrome". It might be as simple as closing google chrome and restarting your computer. Or maybe clearing the cache on google chrome. It might not be the Proko site that is faulting, but the browser's ability to play Vimeo videos (which I think most of the lesson videos are). Are you able to play this video for example, which is a Youtube video Drawing Demo by Glenn Vilppu. Hope this helps :)
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Liandro
Good points, @Jesper Axelsson. If possible, @punchyengland, you might also try different browsers and devices. If the issue persists even so, please let us know.
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Liandro
Hey, @Anubhav Saini! Thanks for your patience in expecting my delayed reply! I think it’s cool that you chose a comic story as a means to express your indignation. Indeed, it’s upsetting that some people still misjudge the importance of art and the legitimacy of an artist’s work. The good news (in which, at least, I believe) is that humankind’s will to make art should always have room to exist in the world somehow, despite any disbeliefs or negative judgements that may emerge. Overall, I agree with @Steve Lenze about the mixture of shots - I think the variety in viewpoints and the sequence they are put in is giving your story a good visual dynamism. I understand that delivering the message “art matters” is the main point of this double-page, so in general, I think it’s okay to overlook a little bit some technical issues such as accuracy in perspective and figure drawing - since the message is clear enough, it’s fine if things aren’t “perfect”. With this in mind, below are a few comments for each specific panel. They concern, mainly, clarity in storytelling, composition and overall artistic quality. Please receive these comments as suggestions based on my personal point of view, not as “corrections” that you necessarily have to make - although feel free to incorporate anything that makes sense to you, of course. Also, feel free to discard or adapt any of my suggestions according to your own creative preferences. (I’m attaching a draw-over with numbers for you to easier reference my comments to each panel). . Panel 1 - I think this panel doesn’t seem to add much to the storytelling, so I think I’d remove it. . Panel 2 - The setting and the characters look fine to me. I’d polish a bit more the lines and shape of the speech bubble. Also, I’d look out more carefully for correct punctuation and capital letters in the sentences, since writing issues could definitely hurt the storytelling in comics. . Panel 3 - Same comments as in Panel 2. . Panel 4 - I think this panel fits well into the story. . Panel 5 - I’d say the environment could be a bit more visually descriptive - at least to me, it looks a bit unclear whether this is a street in a little town, the living room of a big house, the halls of a hostel or something else. Plus, I’m a bit unsure about how this panel fits into the story to connect the previous and the next scenes. Here’s what I understood: he gets angry at his friend and storms out of the room; then, in the next page, he goes to another location to talk to another friend - is that it? Well, if so, then maybe Panel 5 (which is the inbetween moment where he’s alone) could be an interesting point in the story to develop a bit of his introspective thoughts and draw how these thoughts would reflect on his body language, on the environment or on his internal dialogue. For example: maybe he’s walking with his head down and face frowned - so you can plan your composition for this panel in a way that these aspects can be clearly shown; or maybe there’s pouring rain as a symbolism for his anger and sadness; or maybe he’s mulling over his feelings and his friend’s words - then, instead of having just one panel for this introspective moment, you could develop this part of the story into several panels, exploring variety in thought bubbles, facial expressions and perspectives in each one. . Panel 6 - This panel doesn’t seem to add much to the story, so I’d say it would be fine to take it out. . Panels 7 and 8 - Same comments as in Panel 2. . Panel 9 - Same comments as in Panel 4. . Panel 10 - I think it could be nice to show the character walking into this new environment (instead of showing just the environment). The story is understandable even without the character, but I just think that adding him in the scene would create a stronger visual link with the previous panels and better conduct the reader to follow the character through his journey. Also, I’d recommend adding some more texture to the street in order to make the drawing look more complete. . Panel 11 - I understand that your intention is to show the character suffering, but I think it’s so sad that the story ends just with him crying and mulling over his feelings... Wouldn’t it be interesting to focus on him somehow overcoming the criticisms instead? For example: maybe, after leaving his second friend’s house, he goes for a walk in the park and decides to just start sketching the people and the nature around him; this invigorates his energy, and he enjoys the experience so much that he comes back the next day, and the next… and, after a few years, he’s improved his skills so much that he became an accomplished artist ready to make his first solo show, to which he invites his friends (who he hadn’t seen in a while); and when his friends meet him, they look surprised at how he evolved and congratulate him for his accomplishments with his art. This is just one possibility for your story, and a very simple one - of course, there might be other creative choices you could make. But my point, as a suggestion for this ending, is just to consider developing the storytelling in a way that carries the same message (“art is important”, “being an artist is possible”…), but in a more positive and engaging way for your comics’ reader. Hope this helps! There’s a great book named “Understand Comics”, by Scott McCloud, which unravels the main aspects and storytelling techniques in the language of comics - if you’ve never read it, I’d highly recommend! It’s fully written in the format of a graphic novel, so reading it is a true delight. Best of luck with your art!
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Joel Room
Really, struggling with getting the lvl 2 proportions right, sometimes I get confused.
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Liandro
😂 Clever!
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Marco Sordi
2023/1/21. Good morning everybody. Here’s my latest assignment for @Patrick Jones’s course “The Anatomy of Style”. Thanks and have a good weekend.
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Liandro
Hey, @Marco Sordi, this is a beautiful page! Since it’s an assignment, I’d suggest posting it on the respective lesson discussion in Patrick’s “The Anatomy of Style” course (instead of on this page, which is actually related to Stan’s Portrait course). As a general recommendation, when posting your work here on the Proko community, try to make sure you posts are related to the page, lesson or topic you’re posting them on - this should help them be seen by more people who are browsing that same lesson or topic and, consequently, help your work get better attention, especially if you expect the community to give feedback on it. Hope this helps!
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Liandro
After many years studying and working with Proko, I still can’t help but get inspired with Stan’s lessons, even the most elementary ones! Congrats and thanks for putting such high quality art instruction videos out there, @Stan Prokopenko and team!
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Liandro
Hey, @Paul Z! I think @LottaIn has a point, maybe check if the pressure sensitivity settings you’re using are appropriate to the kind of result you would like to obtain. The properties can be set differently depending on the type of device / tablet and on the software, as well as on your own personal preferences, of course. And, if you’re okay with sharing some examples of your own work with lineart to illustrate a bit more clearly the difficulties that you’re facing with it, I’d love to see, since it could help me make more specific comments. But here’s a trap you don’t wanna fall into: thinking that other artists do it easily. I’m pretty sure that all artists who make it look like as if it was easy must have had a good deal of mileage and training before getting comfortable with the process. At your disposal to continue this discussion, if you wish!
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Lancelot The Poet
I have a question: where is the best place to get free models as references?
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Liandro
I like this website: http://www.line-of-action.com
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Muhammad Jacobs
Hei Hei, I'm learning again by following the YT videos. Here I've followed the examples to better my understanding of CSI. The first drawing is me just copying the example (the second is me re-doing it from imagination). The rest is me trying the examples by myself first before copying the drawing examples. The last 3 is my first attempt at exaggeration, followed by the example, and then I retried it again. I followed the same timings as in the video. I've noted my "style" changes drastically depending on which tutorial/book I'm studying from at the time. Is this normal for a beginner?
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Liandro
Hey, @Muhammad Jacobs, these look great! From your comment, it looks like you’re following a pretty solid study process, I’d encourage you to keep it up. I think it’s totally normal that, right now, your “style” changes according to the study source you’re following at the moment. Most people learn how to draw through copy and observation, so it’s kind of expected for many students’ works to look like their teachers’. And, as beginners, our “mental visual library” is yet restricted, so there’s still little to be influenced by but the sources we’re “absorbing from” at each time. No worries. Over the long run, as you vary up the teachers and styles you learn from and craft your own particular preferences for drawing, it’s likely that a more individual style should gradually emerge in a natural way as a sort of combination between your own “artistic personality” plus all the influences you’ve run into throughout your history. Hope this helps!
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Mike Karcz
Hello. Sometimes I struggle with the pelvis, and how to imagine the pelvis as a box, instead of round disks; like, where would the corners of the box be? I'd love and appreciate some tips on drawing the pelvis as a simplified shape.
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Liandro
Hey, @Mike Karcz! The way you’re imagining the box enveloping the pelvis looks pretty effective to me. To make it even simpler, I’d suggest thinking of a basic box instead of a tapering one. In How to Draw Structure in the Body – Robo Bean, Stan mentions which anatomical landmarks to consider when drawing a box to represent the pelvis - although, yeah, the volume of the simple box should also include some muscles, since the pelvis bones for themselves won’t fit perfectly inside it. In that sense, the 3D Model: The Bucket is definitely a more accurate tool for an advanced construction of a believable bone structure for the pelvis, as @Gabriel Palma very properly mentioned. But, in a general sense, we can still use the idea of a simple box to visualize and more easily draw the pelvis or pretty much any 3D object - the key is to let go of a perfect fit and just think in terms of where are the main planes of that object (front, back, sides, top and bottom). As an example, I’m attaching a quick diagram of how I visualize simple boxes in this Skelly pose. Notice it’s not precise, so there’s some room for variety and interpretation, as long as the general plane changes make sense. Using this approach (the “box logic”, as @Steve Huston usually says) can be helpful to keep us grounded in a 3D thinking mode in the simplest way possible. If we train ourselves to solve basic boxes, it can be easier to carve out of it any other more complex forms (such as a pelvis) later on as we develop a drawing. Hope this helps. Keep up the good work!
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Struggler
Hi sir, I am sorry for posting on the wrong thread because I had little idea about how the thread discussion works. Actually yes I like to simplify it more and i do want to have great shape design. I love simple yet interesting shape designing but the problem is when I try to make it simple I think that it's not working and I am loosing all the information here, then it started to looking boring and dull and that just doesn't work at all. And whenever I try to keep it simple I just can't stop myself from making it more complicated and I just keep drawing keep drawing it until I ruined it. Maybe I overworked my work because I don't think that looked good enough when I have simplified the drawing, i keep adding the details to make it work.
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Liandro
No problem, @Struggler! Could you mention any specific artists whose style you admire? Characters or projects which have this quality of simplification and shape design you are seeking for your art? One exercise you could try is to create a reference board filled with examples of artworks you like and which have the visual qualities you want to incorporate more into your drawings. Then, analyze the images and name what are exactly these characteristics that you like and seek - try to be as specific as you can, if possible also thinking about why you like the aspects that you like. For example: “I like that shape because it’s asymmetrical and has balanced negative spaces” or “I like that pose because it has a strong sense of weight and gesture”. Of course, it can also be helpful to do some master copies of these artworks as a way of studying them and intuitively learning their visual qualities. Inversely, you can try being very specific when assessing your own drawings too. When you say “I think that it’s not working”, what aspect exactly isn’t working? Try to clearly elaborate the issue for yourself and, if possible, avoid sticking to general statements such as “the shapes are not working”; instead, maybe rephrase it to something like, for example, “the shapes are getting too anatomical, volumetric and even, but I’d like them to be more stylized, flat and asymmetrical, as in Jon Doe’s work” (whoever Jon Doe might be). Remember to take it easy on yourself - some of us can be harsh when analyzing our own work, so keep in mind that the idea here is not for you to judge your work as good or bad, or as better or worse than someone else’s. No, the idea is just to objectively investigate, within the big areas of “simplification” and “shape design”, what are the specific practical aspects that you feel you want your art to have more of. Let me know if you think any of this could help. And I must say again, I really like your sketches! This image, in particular, is a pretty cool page to look at.
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teetree
Some beans I did following along with the tilt & lean video. Sometimes struggling to see where the forms overlap.
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Liandro
I agree - nice job, @teetree! By looking at your drawings, I can’t guess exactly what overlaps you’re struggling with, so please feel free to share any specifics if you want. A suggestion: sometimes, it can be a good exercise to add a perpendicular cross-contour line to the Bean. For example: if the main cross-contour you’re adding is a center line from top to bottom, you could consider adding a second cross-contour from side to side. This can be especially helpful on the poses where we see more of the top or bottom - the ones where we can see the “poles” / dots of the extremities - and also on poses close to straight-on front views, in which the forms might feel more flat / less 3-dimensional. I’m attaching a draw-over with some visual notes, hope it helps. Other than that, keep up the good work!
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Liandro
Hey, @Struggler! You originally requested my help in another post (https://www.proko.com/s/CFaT), but since there was a different discussion going on there first, I’m creating this new separate topic so we can focus just on your demands here. To provide some context, I’m attaching your drawings, and here’s what you originally wrote: —- Hi sir,  I need your help to improve my work. I want to do cartoon style work but i am unable to simplify it, and that's exhausting. I am not able to making those gorgeous shapes that speaks of life. When I exaggerate something it feels to me that I am doing it wrong. So I want you to give me a honest review of my work so that I can know what I am doing wrong. Thank you —- So, as requested, I’ll share some thoughts! My personal gut reaction to your drawings: I honestly like them. To me, they feel cute and adorable, and I think they also have a nice sense of appeal and storytelling. One thing I like to have in mind is that there is no “wrong way” to draw - art is vast enough to withhold various valid types of expression. And in cartooning, I think this is especially true. But I also understand that we, artists, often idealize a particular style we wish to have, or envision techniques we want to grow upon. With that said, I think it can be important to reframe the question, not so much as “what am I doing wrong?”, but more like “where do I want to get?” I can certainly tell that you are, in fact, already drawing in a cartoon style, since your drawings do have a degree of simplification. The thing is: would you like to simplify even more? If so, what is it about each drawing exactly that you feel you’re having trouble simplifying? You also mention you’d like to make “gorgeous shapes that speak of life” - could this be a hint that what you’re struggling with isn’t exactly simplification, but shape design? (I’m thinking of exaggeration as a part of shape design too, by the way) Let me know if any of this rings true to you and if you might have anything else to share, then we can keep discussing in this thread!
aaron blanchard
can I get a critique on my recent gesture drawings?
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Liandro
Hey, @aaron blanchard! I agree with @morelock - I like the overall dynamics of the poses, just see if you can incorporate a bit more line economy into your process. One way to do this is to try and mentally visualize the lines you’ll draw before actually drawing them. Even if you’re doing timed quick sketches, you don’t need to be literally making marks all the time - it’s totally okay to take a few seconds before or during the sketch to think through and envision what you’re drawing, as this should help you be more deliberate and assertive with your mark-making. Think “draw smart”, not “draw fast”. Another suggestion is to draw every line whole, with one stroke from the beginning to the end (as opposed to “connecting several small strokes into a bigger line”). You can still draw superimposed lines (which means to draw the same line various times), just make sure you draw the whole line every time. Using scratchy little lines to make up for longer lines is a drawing habit that’s usually related to insecurity, so practicing drawing full long lines now can help you become more confident with your process over time. I’m attaching some additional notes plus a quick draw-over on top of some your sketches as a visual feedback, hope it helps. Other than that, keep it up!
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Anna Gorny
Adding some eyes helped me enjoying this assignment :) Drawing the beans it is hard for me to recognize my mistakes. Any feedback would be highly appreciated!
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Liandro
I love these, @Anna Gorny! So much fun. The Bean forms seem to be working pretty well. One thing I notice is that maybe the lines could use just a bit more firmness - if you haven’t, maybe check out Stan’s tips on drawing from the shoulder in this video: How to Hold and Control Your Pencil. Hope it helps. Keep up the good work!
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qcy
Would love feedback on how accurate these are compared to the photo they were based on!
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Liandro
I think they look accurate enough, @qcy! Nice job!
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Vanessa
Asked for help
Hello everybody! I started my art journey two weeks ago with Proko's Figure Drawing Course and since then I did gesture drawing every day. As recommended I did around 12-15 figures. ATM I have around 30-40 min/day for studying. I know that is not perfect and I cannot expect much from that in 2 weeks but I think I improved a little bit and I hope for some critique. The images are from the first day, the first week, and today. I also included 2 10min poses. I struggle with the gesture of the arms and legs and I don't know if I should move on to the bean yet. So any feedback is appreciated. And maybe you also have tips on how I could use my limited time most effectively to improve. Thank you in advance!
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Liandro
Hey, @Vanessa, good job! By comparing the different pages, I can definitely tell you have improved during that time. If you haven’t already, I’d say yeah, go ahead and move on with the course. As an overall recommendation as you keep practicing gesture in the future, I’d say look for pushing the exaggeration even more. Consider “What is this pose about?”, and then imagine ways you can make it even more intense and visually assertive. Think of the silhouette, the forces involved and how the rhythms flow one to the other across the pose as you design each gesture sketch. As to using your limited time efficiently, I’d suggest making your practice as deliberate as you can: define one clear focus for each practice session (for example, “exaggerate the poses”, or “line of action”, or “look for flowing rhythms across the body”); be open to making mistakes; and take some time along your practice to awarely and non-judgementally examine how you did and be mindful of how you can improve as you keep going. Deliberate practice is kind of the opposite of “just doodling” - you set an intention for your practice and assess your own work based on that intention. Another thing I like to do is to use the Pomodoro technique: it’s based on defining short periods of intense focus balanced with quick frequent breaks. To me, it’s a good way to keep focus when I know I have a short time span to concentrate. If you’re interested, maybe do some Googling on it? Hope this helps!
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kotka
Good evening everyone. I always struggle a bit with these kind of exercises. Finding it especially hard to simplify into boxes, rather than round shapes, and seeing/understanding when to "switch" the direction of cross countours to emphasize movement in relation to the bigger shapes, especially when I am paying attention to the horizon line. Any tips om how I can think about it while planning the direction of the shapes? Feel free to draw over my pictures 🙂
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Liandro
Hey, @kotka! This is a challenging exercise indeed, but I’d say you’re headed in a good direction! The main thing about boxes in perspective is to show a sense of convergence, regardless of their position or rotation. In the video up on this page, starting at 7:05, Stan shows a “step-by-step” approach starting with the Y-shaped edges of the box - maybe a quick review on this part could be helpful. Of course, it’s always good to be acquainted with the nuts and bolts of linear perspective, although, for this exercise, it’s better not to be so technical about it, but rather keep it at a more intuitive level. In other words, for this task, it can be more useful to feel comfortable drawing boxes freehand in any angle than to stay attached to any kind of precision regarding perspective lines. Your ability to visualize and switch the direction of the cross-contours should also be benefited through an intuitive approach of practicing perspective. When the forms aren’t all just regularly standing on the ground, but rather twisting and turning in space (as it’s the case for most mannequins), it’s not just the horizon that mainly affects how the cross contours should look, but mostly the relationship between the form and the viewer: are the forms “coming towards us” or “going away from us”? How foreshortened are they? One more thing to have in mind is that the mannequin technique allows for various creative solutions in terms of what forms to use. It’s all a matter of interpreting and designing the body structure in a way that feels cohesive and believable in the drawing. As an example, I’m attaching two variations of the bear mannequin I came up with while attempting to build upon your work when writing this critique - one of the mannequins uses only boxes, and notice how it can become much more simplified and abstract (much less “anatomical”), but still effective in terms of a structure made of forms in three-dimensional space. Hope this helps!
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Struggler
Wow.. these are looking good.
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Liandro
@Struggler Thank you, glad you like these!
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Liandro
Hey, @knightdroid! @Jon Neimeister is making a course on Digital Painting Fundamentals here at Proko, I’d suggest checking it out. If you’re not ready to take the paid course yet, you can find some of Jon’s lessons on Proko’s YouTube channel for free: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtG4P3lq8RHHBiU_VqcY_L9T2iFDeCUJH Alternatively, I also really like the “Digital Painting 101” free mini series at http://www.CtrlPaint.com About where to stop the drawing before starting to shade… it depends, there’s no general rule. Some people have a more painterly approach and draw very few lines before starting to add tone (in a way, you could say that they sketch with tones). But other people, such as myself, for example, are more comfortable with lines. Since you have some mileage with drawing, but are a beginner on shading/painting, I’d recommend developing the sketch as much as you can before shading - at least in the beginning. Try not to skip stages of the line drawing, develop it until you feel that’s as far as you’ll go with the lines. You don’t need to ink necessarily, just make sure to have a drawing that’s fully developed in terms of construction and design. For instance, in your “Spider-Man X Venom” drawing here, I’d say the first one (image 4) would definitely be too early to start shading, but the second (image 5) is pretty close - I think I’d just design the forms of Venom’s tongue a little more (which is looking a bit flat), and perhaps add some elements of an environment to complement the composition - and then I’d say it could be ready to shade. Aside from that, @Steve Lenze’s considerations on posing, gesture, perspective and construction certainly apply too! Over time, as you gain more experience with shading and painting, you might start to feel more confident with painting an undeveloped sketch or with the process of sketching with tones rather than with lines - if that happens, you can simply adjust your process to your more advanced preferences. Hope this helps!
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Kay Dezenter
Hello, I wached the bean intro video last week and practiced them for a while now. Today I was having a really hard time with finding the gesture/ action, so I decided to add the bean into the mix. This has helped me a lot to get a better feel for my gesture drawings. After warming up with 10 60s drawings I went ahead and did the 2min draw along/ assignment example. The result was much better than it would have been without the bean. I am going to do a few gestures in ink soon and look more for force, when observing the reference. Looking forward to your feedback. :) (no idea why, but my pictures get rotated, when uploaded)
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Liandro
Great job, @Kay Dezenter! I really like the simple motions you’re finding in each pose. It’s a great thing that using the Bean helped you with gesture, that’s truly what it’s about: simplifying the motion of the torso. If you have any more specific doubts or questions, feel free to let me know. Keep it up!
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