Gabi H
Gabi H
Earth
Gabi H
I’d like to edit my response. A few people pointed out the flaws in what I’d said and I see that I was wrong. The vanishing points would be different distances apart when objects rotate or change orientation. It’s easy to see this when you use a Station Point to find the vanishing points. I hope I haven’t caused too much confusion.
B12ABCA3 4E44 4ED3 8470 00F3179C0225
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Lucas Mostyn
Hi Stan, where can I download the pictures you've used?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
You can find the assignment images under the How to Draw Arm Bones video in the Downloads tab, it should be called Arm Bones Assignment Images.
Reply
Josh mcgrath
Hey I've been trying to add foreshortening to my mannequins but it's just not working out the way I want it too I have been studying perspective for the past few months and I understand that the closer something is to you the larger it seems and that the further it is the smal.er it gets and I understand that forms overlap when foreshortened yet whenever I try it I can't get it right Should I just stop trying and go back once I learn more about other fundamentals or is there something I'm missing if there any videos sites or anything to help learning this easier I would greatly appreciate any and all help
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
A video/ technique that has helped me a lot is this one by Sycra on YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJWLaDSNBAI. This technique really helps you visualize objects becoming larger as they move closer and it’s explained very well. Foreshortening definitely isn’t easy, but hopefully this will be of some help!
Reply
Al F
I'm having a hard time figuring out whether or not my landmark placements here are correct. I've attached a reference photo, the reference annotated with landmarks, and my attempt at the reference (obviously if the annotation is wrong, then my drawing will be wrong too). I'm focusing on the back mostly here, so really just looking at placement of the acromion process, scapulas, triangular expansion, 7th cervical vertebrae, iliac crest, sacrum (which I think is covered by the model's shorts). Is there any placement here that is incorrect / needs to be shifted?
IMG 0031
72FF47FF 2C2E 4CD7 8488 085290A13DD6
IMG 7463
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
I think to find the teres major, you need to be able to find (or estimate) the scapula as well as its position. I think you did a good job finding the acromion process and the triangular expansion, but I’m not quite sure what the blue diagonal line on the right is supposed to represent (if the blue triangle is supposed to represent the scapula, it’s a bit big to be a scapula. Size changes from person to person but usually the scapula length is about half the length of the rib cage). The orange mass appears mostly to be the serratus anterior, which I’m pretty sure would be flexed in this position. I tried to find the right scapula using the perspective of the left one and measuring it using the length of the rib cage. I’m not sure it’s completely right tho, maybe someone will correct me. I hope some of this will be of some help!
EC3A45B2 8302 4F04 858B 481464E1918A
Reply
mikeyschwarzenagger
hello, i dont totally khow if im doing some problem, can i please get the good and the bad, and tell what i should do,
WIN 20210727 15 37 28 Pro
WIN 20210727 15 36 12 Pro
WIN 20210727 15 37 34 Pro
WIN 20210727 15 37 01 Pro
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
They look good! I would say try being more confident with your lines (easier said than done I realize) to make things look a bit cleaner. I would also recommend, for this lesson, try to do more drawings where you ignore the limbs and just draw the torso, exaggerating its gesture. This will help you better understand the movement of the torso. Your robo bean doesn’t need to be exactly like Stan’s, as long as they explain or show the same idea (the twisting, stretching and squashing of the torso) you’re on the right path. Otherwise, you seem to have a great understanding of the structure; it’s easy to see which way the boxes are facing and how they’re tilting! Hope this helps!
Reply
Gabi H
I’m pretty sure the distance between vanishing points should always stay the same. There’s a gif on Draw a Box that explains this https://drawabox.com/lesson/1/17/rotation (it’s a rotating box, where you can see the vanishing points moving with the box). I think the distance needs to remain the same or else it would be like using different camera lenses. For example, if you take a picture using a wider lens (the objects look more distorted), take a picture using a long lens and try to put them together, it’s very obvious there not part of the same picture (moderndayjames explains lenses briefly in one of his videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XF5YuAK63I , about 4 minutes into the video). I tried to illustrate this using your example number 2, but more extreme. In my example, the green boxes look like they could be in the same scene and the blue boxes look like they could be in a different scene together. But together, the green and blue boxes have very different levels of distortions (because the vanishing points are not the same distance apart) so they don’t work together and make things look weird. Basically the lens stays the same, so the distance between the vanishing points stay the same. Hope this will be of some help! (ps I’m not sure if this is the best way to explain it, or if my explanation is 100% correct, but I’ve heard a lot of people who have much more experience talk about how the distance between vanishing points stays the same in a scene)
304B59AB E876 4956 B59A 3768C3BA8E00
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
I may have misunderstood you’re question. Were you talking about the length of the diagonals you extend towards the vanishing points or the distance between vanishing points when rotating forms in perpective?Sorry if I misinterpreted the question
Reply
lobster
hi there, i bought this course, but i was under the impression there were going to get individual downloadable images to practice? or do we just practice off of the ones proko is doing?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
You can practice off of the one Stan did (I think most people do it to better understand the assignment). The course doesn’t include reference images, but there are model packs you can purchase from Proko. If you’re looking for some timed figure drawing references online, I found that line of action (https://line-of-action.com/practice-tools/figure-drawing) and quickposes (https://quickposes.com/en) are good ressources.
Reply
christiandenosta
hello, I have to be honest, I really want to learn the anatomy of the human body and buy the premium course but I do not have enough money,.. I want to ask some favor, I just want to see the front, back, sideview of this robo skelly...
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
Hey, there is an app called the Skelly - poseable anatomy model for artists app (which is much cheaper) where you can move around and pose Skelly and Robo Skelly. Let me know if the pictures work. Hope this helps!
7369080F FA1E 47A9 B0D9 BC07CD9C98CB
6BC554ED 6D79 4175 A614 0C1008068C79
603D2E0E 7CCE 4F8C 9F0D 5BE7FB449092
8F6FC22E 6002 4E4D AB9C 10FBE5B130F3
Reply
Gabi H
You mesure the cone of vision from the station point. A 60 degree cone of vision is a 60 degree angle (30 degrees on each side) that you extend to the horizon line. Using the center vanishing point (CVP) draw a circle which will be your cone of vision. I drew an example of a 60 degree cone of vision, but it’s basically the same thing for a 90 degree one (it’s just a 90 degree from the station point, 45 degrees on each side). Hope this helps!
3B649898 12C4 41A3 8C14 80C8150E2862
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Attila B
Hello everyone. Thanks for a bit of feedback. I know these are not great, but they are very first attempts. Trying to seek feedback early during practice to avoid getting used to mistakes.
IMG 0199
IMG 0198
IMG 0197
IMG 0201
IMG 0203
IMG 0200
IMG 0202
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
I think the biggest thing you’re missing is proportions. Not just of the overall body, but of each individual part of the body and their forms (ex. the third image, the leg is incredibly long and narrow). Proportion is talked about in a later lesson (and is a difficult thing to master in general), but I think paying attention to size relations throughout the body, while simplifying the forms, could be a beneficial thing to start to train your eye to see. I would also recommend trying to use more structural forms (make them less organic). If you take a look at Stan’s examples, you can see he uses mostly basic forms. Sometimes they’re bending or twisting, but they still make the figure look stable and structured. I suggest you take a look at the lesson notes, they tend to be of great help and they break down the most important information. Hope this helps! ps. I really like your mindset of posting your work for advice early to minimize bad habits, it’s a really smart idea!
Reply
lukeng
Redid some assignment studies. Looking for feedback
IMG 20210708 124147 956
IMG 20210708 124147 911
IMG 20210708 124147 864
IMG 20210708 124147 959
IMG 20210708 124147 877
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
Excellent job! I really admire your dedication!
Reply
Brenden Chianese
Hello everyone! Been working on gesture for the past couple of weeks. Below are some two minute poses I did today. Was hoping I could get some feedback. I'm starting to feel like I'm getting an idea about the flow of the body but at the same time I feel like I'm missing something. I'm not sure what. I'm hoping another pair of eyes could see the mistakes I'm making. What I have noticed is that I have a hard time exaggerating the body, and that I also struggle with arms/legs as well. Any advice and criticism is welcome!
Ges4
Ges6
Ges5
Ges2
Ges3
Ges1
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
I think you did a great job! You can really feel the flow in each pose! The only thing I have to say is maybe worry less about the contours and try to simplify everything to its gesture (especially the legs, don’t pay too much attention to the contours of the quads and calves). But honestly you’ve done an amazing job here!
Reply
lukeng
Here's my assignment studies. Feedback and critiques would be greatly appreciated!
IMG 20210706 134930 183
IMG 20210706 134930 172
IMG 20210706 134930 179
IMG 20210706 134930 138
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
I think you’ve absolutely nailed the structure for both your shoulder bones and the rib cage! The one thing I noticed is that the scapulae look too small. Obviously proportions change from person to person but usually Stan’s unit of measurement is (for the length top to bottom) one cranial unit and it’s a little under half the length of the rib cage. Yours seem to be almost a third of the length of the rib cage. For reference, he talks about the proportions of the scapula 6 minutes into the critique video of the shoulder bones. Otherwise, great job on the structure and perspective!
Reply
mameko
Anyone knows how to draw oval ? any tutorial recomendation ?
bucket
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
If you go to the critique video for this lesson Stan talks about how to draw the top cap (since they’re in the same perspective, the bottom cap) of the bucket. He talks about it in the first critique he gives, so you don’t have to look far.
Reply
Johan Kurniawan
I tried to do the exercise but I'm having trouble even at finding the bony landmarks, a lot of uncertainty as I'm doing this one. I hope someone can point out my mistakes because I'm not even sure myself where are the mistakes even after looking back at the video lessons and the 3D model
1
Identifiying the Shoulder Muscles 1
2
Identifiying the Shoulder Muscles 2
3
Identifiying the Shoulder Muscles 3
4
Identifiying the Shoulder Muscles 4
7
Identifiying the Shoulder Muscles 7
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
Usually when I’m trying to find the scapula I follow the acromion process and then I try to find the infraspinatus, or rather the dent it creates next to the trapezius. I think you did a good job at finding it in these studies! Though sometimes it looks like it’s too close to the rib cage (especially in the last drawing, I think it may be because they’re pointing inward too much). The main mistake I found is that the teres major is too large, which is making the infraspinatus look too small. Proportions do change from person to person, but it seems more like you haven’t completely understood its function or form (I’m mostly referring the the first drawing). Since it’s main functions are to help bring the arm down towards the body and extend it to bring the elbow back, it is extended when the arms are raised. The infraspinatus laterally rotates the arm, so it’s usually flexed when the arms are raised. In the first image, the teres major is being stretched, so it should have a shape similar to the right one in your last drawing. If you check out the eBook, the teres major has a shape more like a cylinder whereas the infraspinatus is more flat and wide. I think because the shoulder muscles don’t all flex at the same time, it’s important to understand their individual functions and shapes. The eBook is very helpful, I strongly recommend you take a look. Hope this will be of some help!
Reply
Gabi H
These are quite nice! I would recommend trying to push your beans further in terms of gesture so you can really feel the twisting, the pulling and the squishing (maybe something that can help with this is drawing a line of action). I would also suggest making your beans “tighter” in a sense. They feel floppy, kinda like they represent something other than the movement of the torso. Something I think could help with this is using more spherical forms and really emphasizing the stretch and squash of the bean. Another thing that can help is drawing Stan’s drawing if the bean from his video(s) to help you get familiar with the bean’s movement (it would also help you get mileage and it gives you the assurance your doing thing properly as you follow along) Otherwise, I really like your gestures, especially how you simplify the hands! And for your question, usually Stan recommends practicing each lesson for a week or two and making sure you understand each concept before moving on. Hope this helps!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
concuu
Any tips/pointers would be greatly appreciated. Also if you notice any bad habits.
gesture4
gesture5
gesture6
gesture7
gesture8
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
I really like the variety of poses you have here! It seems as though you focus too much on the contour at times, instead of the gesture. Sometimes putting a bump for the forearm or calves doesn’t add much to the gesture and can actually stiffen it (for example the first image, the second drawing to the left, the shape of the forearm doesn’t follow the flow of the rest of the drawing). Try using fewer lines and possibly setting a limit or an estimation for how many you’ll allow yourself to use. This could also help reduce the scratchy lines. In most of your drawings it looks very much like you understand the pose, try trusting yourself and your lines more (I realize that this takes time, but you’re on the right path:) ). Hope this will be of some help!
Reply
Bryan
Should I spend a week of gesture drawing or can I just go into bean and other sessions after doing gesture?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
Usually Stan says you should spend a week or two on each lesson and make sure you have a good understanding of the concepts before moving on. Everything builds on top of each other so it’s a good idea to get comfortable with each lesson. Hope this answers your question!
Reply
Gabi H
I really like your initiative, but I think for anatomy it’s generally better to understand the structure (in this case the bones) and then the forms that go on top (muscles). This would also help you learn proportions and give you a better idea on how to simplify thing (like understanding the meaning of the circles, they would represent the knee). I quite like your hands, I think with a bit more structure, you could greatly improve and add a sense of three dimensionality to your drawings. It also seems you’re trying to mannequinize the legs, maybe you could try the proko figure drawing course before the anatomy course? It would be a great starting point if you want to have very fluid and gestural drawings. Hope this helps!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Alexander Wegner
Hello everyone I've just done theese drawings. It would really help me if you have any feedback. Thanks :D!
1625236913261
1625236913253
1625236913242
Critica estrucutura 3
EStrucutura critica 1
Crítica estrucutra 2
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Gabi H
Hi Alexander! My critique is mostly for the first image. I think for this lesson it would be better to focus less on anatomy and rather try to capture the gesture using simple forms. What you did here is quite nice, but it seems the gesture was less important because of the anatomy you put on top. The gesture doesn’t seem to have been pushed to the same extent or farther than the reference. You show a good amount of understanding of the more simple forms in space and mannequinization (you did an incredible job in the third drawing), but sometimes details can distract you from and hide the things you need to focus more on. I don’t really want to say never add anatomy, but I think, in this case, focusing on drawing a nice mannequinized gesture would help anything you put on top flow a lot better. Hope this will be of some help!
Reply