H H
H H
Earth
Activity Feed
@adove
Hello, I'm new in this platform. I would want to know how to get the reference pictures used in these assignment please ? And do I need a special tool to do the exercise or just pencil is necessary? Thank you in advance for your reply.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
2yr
The assignment images are usually in the downloads tab under the first video of each new lesson (here’s the one for this lesson https://www.proko.com/course-lesson/how-to-draw-arm-bones-anatomy-for-artists/downloads ), the reference images are under the one that says Assignment Images. For this assignments it’s an anatomy tracing, so you can print it out and draw on top or use a digital program. Any tool works! Have fun!
Reply
C
Asked for help
So - I finished the picture over the weekend. Any feedback and tips, C&C, whatever is welcome! If anyone has any advice on finishing up a traditional piece digitally too, that would be great. I did a 'multiply' layer to push the darker values a little in pixlr The paper I tried to ink on was not ideal in the end so it was difficult to get a clean gradient inkwashing in larger areas buuut thankfully the paper didn't bubble too much. I kind of stuck with the original composition from over a year ago and didn't remove too much in the end so eh maybe it is a little busy. It felt good at least to finish something that had just been a very rough pencil sketch for so long.. Thanks for looking ! (:
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
3yr
Incredibly done! I think you did a great job not making the background details too overwhelming, your kappa figure still pops out. I’m still amazed by the level of detail! Congrats on finishing!
Reply
H H
Hey Matt! I haven’t gotten to that part yet, but I’m pretty sure you could do it in any medium. I think it’s a great idea to render it like you would a comic, since it’s more relevant to your goal. I’m not sure what style comic you draw in but here’s a few David Finch videos : https://www.proko.com/lesson/how-to-cross-hatch-for-comics-david-finch/discussions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okQfa98uLlQ Other good ressources: Robert Marzullo and How to Draw Comics . NET on Youtube and this video by page Page One Comics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxNe6jqiTDk (it’s a long video - he starts rendering anatomy around 27 minutes in) I hope this will be of some help!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
This is incredible! The textures and details are fantastic! I agree that trying to push the fish and figures would be a good idea and maybe making the middle ground/ background less crowded could help with that? But this looks amazing and I’m excited to see the finished piece!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
I’d like to edit my response. A few people pointed out the flaws in what I’d said and I see that I was wrong. The vanishing points would be different distances apart when objects rotate or change orientation. It’s easy to see this when you use a Station Point to find the vanishing points. I hope I haven’t caused too much confusion.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Lucas Mostyn
Hi Stan, where can I download the pictures you've used?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
3yr
You can find the assignment images under the How to Draw Arm Bones video in the Downloads tab, it should be called Arm Bones Assignment Images.
Reply
Josh mcgrath
Hey I've been trying to add foreshortening to my mannequins but it's just not working out the way I want it too I have been studying perspective for the past few months and I understand that the closer something is to you the larger it seems and that the further it is the smal.er it gets and I understand that forms overlap when foreshortened yet whenever I try it I can't get it right Should I just stop trying and go back once I learn more about other fundamentals or is there something I'm missing if there any videos sites or anything to help learning this easier I would greatly appreciate any and all help
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
3yr
A video/ technique that has helped me a lot is this one by Sycra on YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJWLaDSNBAI. This technique really helps you visualize objects becoming larger as they move closer and it’s explained very well. Foreshortening definitely isn’t easy, but hopefully this will be of some help!
Reply
Al F
I'm having a hard time figuring out whether or not my landmark placements here are correct. I've attached a reference photo, the reference annotated with landmarks, and my attempt at the reference (obviously if the annotation is wrong, then my drawing will be wrong too). I'm focusing on the back mostly here, so really just looking at placement of the acromion process, scapulas, triangular expansion, 7th cervical vertebrae, iliac crest, sacrum (which I think is covered by the model's shorts). Is there any placement here that is incorrect / needs to be shifted?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
3yr
I think to find the teres major, you need to be able to find (or estimate) the scapula as well as its position. I think you did a good job finding the acromion process and the triangular expansion, but I’m not quite sure what the blue diagonal line on the right is supposed to represent (if the blue triangle is supposed to represent the scapula, it’s a bit big to be a scapula. Size changes from person to person but usually the scapula length is about half the length of the rib cage). The orange mass appears mostly to be the serratus anterior, which I’m pretty sure would be flexed in this position. I tried to find the right scapula using the perspective of the left one and measuring it using the length of the rib cage. I’m not sure it’s completely right tho, maybe someone will correct me. I hope some of this will be of some help!
Reply
@mikeyschwarzenagger
hello, i dont totally khow if im doing some problem, can i please get the good and the bad, and tell what i should do,
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
3yr
They look good! I would say try being more confident with your lines (easier said than done I realize) to make things look a bit cleaner. I would also recommend, for this lesson, try to do more drawings where you ignore the limbs and just draw the torso, exaggerating its gesture. This will help you better understand the movement of the torso. Your robo bean doesn’t need to be exactly like Stan’s, as long as they explain or show the same idea (the twisting, stretching and squashing of the torso) you’re on the right path. Otherwise, you seem to have a great understanding of the structure; it’s easy to see which way the boxes are facing and how they’re tilting! Hope this helps!
Reply
H H
I’m pretty sure the distance between vanishing points should always stay the same. There’s a gif on Draw a Box that explains this https://drawabox.com/lesson/1/17/rotation (it’s a rotating box, where you can see the vanishing points moving with the box). I think the distance needs to remain the same or else it would be like using different camera lenses. For example, if you take a picture using a wider lens (the objects look more distorted), take a picture using a long lens and try to put them together, it’s very obvious there not part of the same picture (moderndayjames explains lenses briefly in one of his videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XF5YuAK63I , about 4 minutes into the video). I tried to illustrate this using your example number 2, but more extreme. In my example, the green boxes look like they could be in the same scene and the blue boxes look like they could be in a different scene together. But together, the green and blue boxes have very different levels of distortions (because the vanishing points are not the same distance apart) so they don’t work together and make things look weird. Basically the lens stays the same, so the distance between the vanishing points stay the same. Hope this will be of some help! (ps I’m not sure if this is the best way to explain it, or if my explanation is 100% correct, but I’ve heard a lot of people who have much more experience talk about how the distance between vanishing points stays the same in a scene)
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
H H
3yr
I may have misunderstood you’re question. Were you talking about the length of the diagonals you extend towards the vanishing points or the distance between vanishing points when rotating forms in perpective?Sorry if I misinterpreted the question
Reply
Help!
Browse the FAQs or our more detailed Documentation. If you still need help or to contact us for any reason, drop us a line and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible!
Your name
Email
Message