Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Crystal Blue (she/her)
Earth
Squinting at potatoes is my ✨passion✨
Crystal Blue  (she/her)
I love the bird's expression. He looks grumpy
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Hi Emily, Your situation sounds incredibly similar to where I was a few months ago. There was a point when I hadn't picked up my sketchbook for months and months ('twas not a good time), but I've recently gotten back into drawing regularly, so I'll share what helped me: I don't know if this will work for you, but it really helped me to draw with other people around my own skill level. Seeing them make drawings that were decent but not spectacular or anything without beating themselves up about it and just having fun somehow allowed me to go easier on myself as well.  (this does rely on having art friends tho, lol. heck maybe I could show you some of my mediocre drawings that I don't hate myself for? idk.) Another thing that helped was setting out with the purpose of doing a bad drawing, to kinda take the pressure off.  As for the difficulty planning an art curriculum, as a fellow autistic I can definetly relate to being overwhelmed by the sheer amount of things there are to learn. I did pretty well following Stan's basic figure drawing course. I just did the free version because I was still at the point where I really just needed to learn the basics. The structure with the assignments worked well for me. Also I'd highly reccomend the youtube channel Xabio arts, the vibes are very chill and there's alot of emphasis on being nice to yourself even if you think your art is trash.  Regarding the Tattoo portfolio, have you seen that reality TV show InkMaster? They're really horribly mean on that show. IDK if it is representative of the entire Tattoo community, but if it is, then having your work laughed at is about the gentlest response you can hope for!  Anyway, I hope some of that is helpful. I am not old nor wise, but I've definetly been there (kinda still am there sometimes). Best of luck!  - Crystal
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Hi, does anyone know of any art classes that are taught live online (zoom or smtn) and take place in summer? I'd particularly like to take either a figure drawing or anatomy class. I've found a few that are online but the timing works out where they overlap with school :/
Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Looks nice! You could try taking bounce light into account, it seems complex but it’s not that bad. Instead of going lightest closest to light source, darkest farthest from the light source, have a light side that gets darker farther from the light source, a core shadow, and then a dark part where that’s just a little lighter than the core shadow. Also, practicing cell shading is a helpful way to get used to figuring out where the core shadow would be, though it looks like your goal is to draw in a realistic style so it might not be as useful.
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
I like how in the second one most areas are either mostly dark tones or mostly light tones, except for around the eyes where there’s a much wider range of values. Really makes them pop
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Any advice on how I could better capture the energy in the reference image? The first time I drew it (sketchy one) I didn’t think I got it quite right so I redrew it (polished one) but looking back I think the first one looks better. also not related to gesture but I had some trouble on the hairstyle and facial expression on the polished second one
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
I love this so much! The way the little bits of glowey green contrast with the matte-ness of the rest of the painting is very nice
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
It’s been awhile since I’ve done much drawing (bc school’s busy and also ✨poor mental health✨) but I finally was able to do some sketching. I was mainly focused on getting the muscles right and making the shading look not super rendered but decent enough. Any feedback would be appreciated. :)
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Thank you so much for sharing this, I don’t have any advice but I struggle with the same things almost exactly. Nice to know I’m not alone.
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
For the rendering, you could probably play around with adding in more hard edges, and balancing soft and hard edges. (Sinix has some good videos that go into that if you’re interested). You do that a little bit though with the purple shading on the arm and ear, which I am a big fan of, love the color choice. Looks great. Also might be interesting to experiment with using some different brushes that aren’t as blurry.
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Super helpful video but doing the exercises is where I draw the line
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
I think what you could do is focus less on getting proportions + perspective right and more on capturing the feel and motion of the pose. The perspective and proportion on these look good, but the top one looks kind of stiff. For gesture, it's helpful to start with drawing something like a stick figure. A way you can start doing that is draw one line of action that captures the main movement in the pose, it usually follows the movement of the spine. You can also add lines for the arms and legs. You won't draw a lot of lines, and usually the lines you draw will be pretty big. The way most people practice gesture is by doing a bunch of really fast drawings, and usually when you start out they'll be pretty messy. Practicing gesture is also a great time to get used to using an overhand grip. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMC0Cx3Uk84) Here's a website that explains it a bit better than I do, that you can also use for reference photos: https://line-of-action.com/learn-to-draw I hope that was helpful, and if you have any questions, please ask!
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Hmm... maybe you could try cell shading first, to separate the dark areas and the light areas, then add gradients within the cell shading and add details. This could be helpful to make sure that the darkest value in the light area is lighter than the lightest value in the dark area (right now it looks like the details on the fingers are darker than the shadows on the sides of the hand). I hope that helped, if you have any questions, please ask!
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
As advised, I did some studies with basic shapes and painting food and textures. I feel pretty confident about the shapes, but getting the colors right on the potatoes was difficult. Any advice would be appreciated!
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Luigi Manese
Hi @Crystal (she/her) Blue, I think both James Doane and Levi make excellent points. When it comes to making a full blown painting, here are a list of the 'sub categories' that you need to have locked down in order to make your piece successful. Good composition: Good abstract design with a strong value read. The elements within your composition should create a clear focal area. Drawing: - this includes solid perspective, solid proportions in your characters, and a clear understand of form turning in space Light on form Color: making sure your color palette harmonizes well together. Additionally, this includes balancing your warm and cool colors. Edges: varying your hard and soft edges to turn form and to create focus in an image. Basically by trying to tackle a full on acrylic illustration such as this, you're juggling 20 different things. If you aren't experienced with each of the subcategories of painting, then juggling all of these concepts is going to be a frustrating experience. Just like James and Levi mentioned, starting out with something simple like painting spheres and cubes would be super helpful, but it mostly helps to familiarize yourself with the medium. I personally think that if you tackled each sub category on their own (and started by learning really solid drawing fundamentals first) then your paintings will only get stronger from here on out. The proko site and YouTube channel have a bunch of free resources on drawing fundamentals, and if you need any help then you can call on any of us in the forums to guide and encourage you. Hope this helps, and feel free to let me know if I can clarify anything for you.
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Thanks for the help, especially for breaking down the sub-categories!
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Levi Simpson
While I can't really give you advice on using acrylics as I haven't really used them. I thought I would share one piece of advice for learning that I think can be helpful. It's to focus on your intent and remove other distractions. By this I mean, if you're trying to learn acrylics lets say, but you chose to also do it while making an illustration, with a subject you're not yet comfortable drawing, and perspectives you've not yet figured out, you're now adding many hurdles to your process of learning acrylics distracting you from what may have initially been your focus. It all depends though if you're doing it for the sake of learning acrylics. I'm not saying you shouldn't push yourself or take on a challenge. :) But painting some blocks, spheres, and other shapes and textures may allow you to focus more on the paint and techniques you need to learn that you can then apply later to an illustration with other challenges. :)
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Thanks for the advice!
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James Doane
Hey Crystal! I have not used acrylics for a long time, but painting is hard for a while. I would recommend starting with some basics. Paint a ball, a cube, some fruit, simple still life paintings, etc. to get familiar with colors and technique. From there you can start trying more complex paintings.
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
I'll try that, thank you so much!
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
This is the second time I tried acrylics, and though it didn't come out how I had hoped, this is far from the disaster it could've been. Painting the cliff was the biggest struggle. I had a hard time getting the colors right, I was going for more of a sandy brown at first but that didn't exactly work out. I was going for a more desert-y palate in general, but I couldn't figure out how to get the colors to mix right. I'm still really new to this, so advice for the general process and using layers would be helpful. Is it clear that the horse is a horse? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!
Fall off a cliff
brevittyy
Hello everybody😀 I have been doing some robo bean. Pls let me know if im doing something wrong, it would be very helpful.😀
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
Overall these look pretty good! The ribcage box on the first (top) one looks a little long, and the middle section on the bottom left one looks long as well. I hope that was helpful :)
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Andrea Rubbini
I have added new guys to a Patrol Field crew. Guess it's time now to kill some darling and decide which one should go on with more studies. If I have to choose only one, I think I would go on with the scorpio grape, seems like something that could bring nice shapes to the table.
Field Patrol
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Crystal Blue  (she/her)
I like the scorpio grape too, I think you could get some neat results by playing around with making the grapes different sizes
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