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Peter Anton
Peter Anton
Durham, NC
Online art student working to become a freelance illustrator
Peter Anton
Man, I feel like you need some realness,so here's the thing: of course you don't find joy in rendering out pieces that take 100 hours. The point of a cast drawing (etc.) isn't to have fun, it's to train your eye and hand to take a drawing to a very high level of finish. To be frank, I don't think you'd be asking this question if you were happy doing what you're doing. Even if you can fool the world, YOU know you're avoiding the challenge of finishing a piece. Of course people aren't gonna take your art seriously if all you do is quick, loose stuff, because you aren't taking yourself seriously. If you want to be taken seriously, you gotta pay your dues. You can do all the fun sketches you want, but don't expect people to value them if you don't put in the thousands of hours that it takes to get good. You absolutely CAN make highly rendered pieces, you just need to find a mentor or school who can coach you to that level. Mastery takes a long time and it demands everything of you.
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Peter Anton
Overall shape of the head is incorrect. Make sure you get the big shape right or everything that follows will be wrong. It's not the right eye that's wrong, it's the shape of the head. General to specific. Big to small.
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Marco Sordi
2021/9/23. Good morning everyone. Here's my 30 min. warming up exercise. I noticed that after almost a year I've been started to study drawing, my eyes have become more accurate in measurements. Still remain a few major issues to fix. In this case the angle of the mouth and the edge of the left side of her face are a little bit off. But I feel more confident now compared to what I could do a year ago. Loomis method is great to learn how to establish the main proportions and the position of the features but anytime I tried to apply it to a real person picture I realized how much it can be tricky. Thanks
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Peter Anton
The loomis method is great for constructing heads from any angle. It is not the best tool for drawing an accurate portrait from life. I'd use more of an atelier block-in method for that, where you focus on capturing the 2d shapes. It's a much more direct way to accurately capture a likeness. The loomis method teaches you to construct, but isn't as efficient for likeness
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Peter Anton
Here's what stands out to me: 1) the skin looks too reflective-very contrasty as if it's made of metal. So you end up with really dark darks and really light lights everywhere, creating chaos. You wanna save your high contrast areas for the focal point 2) the colored one looks grayed out, creating a very sickly, dead feeling, like a zombie. Flesh has reds and pinks and sometimes greens and blues and purples. It's not just tan over a grayscale underpainting. That gives you zombie flesh. 3) the feet are almost exactly the same in both of these. In animation they call this "twinning." When both the feet look the same, it is boring and unnatural looking. Even if the reference is that way, you'd be better off adjusting it. Edit: I'd also play down the ribs in the second one. Even in the photo they are distracting and "samey" ( the design is too repetitive and doesn't create an appealing shadow pattern that helps describe the form)
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Jule Hollstein
Here is my version of the portrait. :) I would appreciate any feedback :)
Morgan 3
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Peter Anton
Looks great! Shape and value are great, and so I'd say you can focus on improving your edges. The shadows look like they transition too abrubtly on the left side of the face, and watch your outlines if realism is your goal (especially on the light side of an object). There are some really hard edges on the left side of the mouth and left eye that could be softened
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Peter Anton
I'm all for more diversity, as long as the standard of quality artists remains. The problem I had with the Jennifer Wang podcast, if I recall, is that she was actively looking for stuff to be offended by. As in, "use these approved words and phrases or you are a racist and misogynistic." It just reeked of someone trying to assert their moral superiority more than anything else
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Peter Anton
Feels too contrasty. I'd say try to control your values more, since right now you've got a lot of darkdarks right up against lightlights, and so the eye just goes everywhere. Tyler Edlin has a lot of good Youtube vids on landscape design
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Peter Anton
Design critiques: I'm not buying the dagger sitting in that thin cloth band. If this guy is in the mountains climbing, hunting, and engaging in melee combat with bears, he's gonna need a sturdier holster. I also wouldn't have known he's a leader if you didn't tell me. He kinda looks like a generic viking. I don't know the solution, but that's just my impression. His clothes look very new. If you were to render this, I would add weathering and tears. Also wouldn't his arms get cold in the snow? Unless that's intentional to show how tough he is, I'd dress him in warmer clothes. Otherwise I like it- great work!
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Peter Anton
It feels too cool to me. I think it's important in the original photo that there are 3 major warm areas to balance out the cools: the tan triangle on top of the car, the figure, and the yellowish grass on the right side. There are also clumps of orange in the bottom grass. I'd say squint more on the grass and capture the big shapes and overall gradient from left to right. I think the sky could be lighter too, especially as it approaches the horizon line,
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Peter Anton
Here's what I notice: 1) the bridge of the nose is vertical in yours, when it should be angled 2) your edges are too hard on the cheek, forehead, and chin. Needs a smoother transition from shadow to light 3) the far side of the face is drawn as if it's straight on, which gives your drawing a "stretched out" look. Overall I'd think more about wrapping the features around the 3d forms of the head
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Peter Anton
Hey man, you're not a disappointment. You might be disappointed with the situation, but YOU are not a disappointment. You're a human who is encountering obstacles on the path to mastery. Either accept that art isn't gonna work out for you or figure out a way to overcome those difficulties. In hard times I find it helpful to ask: "why is this problem awesome?" And if you really can't do art, you can still figure out a way to do something else creative and productive with your life. You got this man :) treat yourself with love and compassion-this isn't your fault. Just do your best and get 1% better every day
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Peter Anton
Your drawings are incredible for your age and it would be a crime for you to stop drawing. You could try getting a big newsprint pad and some vine charcoal, and draw with your arm, so that your wrist and fingers don't have to do much work. It's probably all the little detail work you do with your fingers. Check if you're spending a lot of time doing other stuff that might hurt your hand, like playing video games or typing on your smartphone. Maybe try doing Yoga (yoga with Adrienne on Youtube) or look up Physical Therapy exercises/recommendations for carpal tunnel on youtube. Other options: draw with your other hand, do sculpture, do 3d modeling in Blender, learn photography. If you REALLY can't draw, figure out something creative you CAN do. Creative people gotta create or we go crazy (in my experience)
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Peter Anton
Yeah, my guess is you're missing a sense of purpose. You don't know why you're doing art. For example: I'm a teacher, and my purpose is inspiring and educating my students. In order to do that, I need a deep understanding of the concepts I intend to teach them. So what's your purpose? What's the impact you want to have had on the world when you are lying on your deathbed? I'd recommend finding some Brendan Burchard youtube videos on purpose and seeking clarity. His book "High Performance Habits" is also great
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Peter Anton
Not really a critique, just wanna suggest that you do your research into the art industry. A lot of people go in blind because they love art, only to wind up doing something they hate or possessing skills that won't get them the job they want. Try to narrow down what you want to do. And don't go into debt with student loans (there's a good podcast series called Borrowed Future about the student loan crisis if you want to learn how horrible student loans are. Totally rambling, but just wanna warn you since you might be thinking about college Some questions to ask yourself: 1) do you want to go into animation or video games (or something else)? 2) do you enjoy working with 3d programs like Zbrush? 3) are you more interested in design or illustration? Feng Zhu and Trent Kaniuga are good people to listen to for video games Brett Bean and Stephen Silver are great for animation
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Peter Anton
I think it looks cool and has a good feel to it. Main thing is it doesn't feel like a portal since there's no magical energy in the center, unless you meant it to just be a stone arch, if that's what you meant by portal. I also think you could vary up the size of the rocks more (tiny, medium, huge). They could also use more weathering. I think it also might be too symmetrical in its structure.
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Peter Anton
I was gonna say the same thing: your brushwork looks a bit too slick and samey. Maybe study edges and breakup patterns (how the edges appear in the transition from shadow to light). Texture is mainly about two things: silhouette and breakup pattern
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jeff tang
Asked for help
mods, admins Im sorry I accidentally pressed report when I was trying to go to replies
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Peter Anton
That's happened to me before haha. Don't know why they are so close
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Peter Anton
Main thing I see is the positioning of the sword is really weird. Should be more upright if he's just standing there. The other thing is that the legs are in the same position, which makes it less interesting. The shield looks brand new, when it could be an opportunity for storytelling: battle scars, chips, pieces missing, etc.
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Peter Anton
The thing that stand out to me is that the trees are really boxy, almost parallel to the canvas. There's also no overlap from the salamander to the tree behind it, and same with the first tree to the second tree. I'd also look into how you can improve the foreground- shoving some plants into the corner is kind of a default solution that's not really interesting (I'm trying to break that habit too!). I'd do some master studies and see what they do
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Peter Anton
Follow the river to the source. So for these NSFW artists, see if you can determine their influences and find them in old masters. Ex: if you're into hentai art, maybe look at the Japanese Ukiyo-e artists like Hokusai. Another example: for Peter de Seve, you can find out among his influences were Heinrich Kley and Arthur Rackham. There are two buckets of art parents: content and technique. Bouguereau goes in the technique pile because he's a wizard but his art doesn't make me feel anything. On the other hand, I like stuff like Yugioh and Naruto for the awesome monsters and superpowers, but I don't want to draw in that syle. Only a few artists will combine both content and technique, and those are your favorites (Jesper Ejsing and Tyler Jacobson for me)
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