Kristian Nee
Kristian Nee
San Diego, CA
I work for Proko, and I also I live in a van and talk to people
Bryce Kho
Bryce Khoadded a new lesson
9d
Kristian Nee
Hey Matt! Good job on these, you're right to stay away from detailing at this stage. A couple things, though the gesture is getting there you're losing a lot of the energy of the poses. What I suspect is happening is that you're not drawing as much with your arm as you should be. With these sorts of drawings, feel free to draw past where you think the shapes should end. These ones that you've done have very abrupt ends which do stop the figures displaying their action. See the example below for what I'm talking about:
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Kristian Nee
Hey! Just thought I'd throw my two-cents in. I struggled a lot deciding what type of job as an artist I wanted to do. I tried out environment art, modeling, fine art, concept art, ect... Even beyond art jobs I tried out programming, real estate, various business jobs. I tried a bunch of different things. The answer that I have settled on is that there isn't an art job out there that is going to be the thing that makes your life finished. At the end of the day it's still a job. What I would recommend to anyone wanting to get into the art industry is to try out a bunch of different things and see what you enjoy the most. No matter what you end up doing, you're going to have to be spending 95% of your time in front of a computer doing that thing. If you end up not liking it, I believe that 1. you won't want to do it for long, and 2. the lack of interest in the subject will make you less likely to be successful at it. In terms of how to enter, there are a bunch of different ways and it's different for everyone. Some people get jobs by showing their portfolios to art directors at conventions, some people get approached on Twitter because one of their posts blows up, some people apply directly to their dream job and get it right away, some people grind for years while working at a coffee shop to get the skills to be able to get the job. The list goes on and on. I think by just following the path of trying things out you're going to narrow down what you like, and as a result you will find entry points that you are willing to do. Hope this helps!
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Kristian Nee
Hey! Great job on these! You're getting the hang of it! The first thing I'd say is that though these drawings are accurate, and structurally sound, they don't flow together. The individual shapes don't feel like a cohesive whole and as a result, all of them feel disjointed. I did a draw over below illustrating what I'm talking about. What I'd recommend is review Stan's videos, How to Draw Gesture and Steve Huston's videos on how gesture relates to structure. You're on the right track and keep up the good work!
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Misha Oplev
Misha Oplevadded a new lesson
29d
Christina Cornett
Christina Cornettadded a new lesson
29d
Kristian Nee
Hey! Not much to say on this, you did a really good job! Keep up the good work
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Kristian Nee
Hey Carin! Good job on these, these are impressive for only having done it for a month. You're really getting the hang of primitives, shading and composition. What I would say is that though these are getting there, you should keep an eye on a few things moving forward. The first thing would be gesture. It's sort of a tough concept to understand, but once you get it your drawings will improve drastically. Gesture is defined as the movement between forms, which essentially describes "what the body is doing". Your drawings are stiff, and over complicated which create a bunch of the problems with the structure, and as a result the overall forms. An exercise that helped me was to try to simplify the entire body into a single line of action. Below are example draw overs of what I'm talking about. The second would be line quality and simplification. Again, these are definitely getting there but you're focusing too much on the contour of the drawing vs the gesture. Gesture and line quality are closely tied, but still different. At this stage in a drawing, the only lines you should be using are C S and I lines. See this video Stan did for reference Q&A – Gesture vs Contour and Scribbly Lines. As it is right now, you're definitely including too much information in your drawings. As a general rule of thumb as well, when drawing females try to use less anatomy and more basic forms. In your second drawing, the anatomy indications makes her look more masculine. The third thing is more clearly organizing your shadow shapes. As it is right now, there are no clear shadow patterns or edges for where your shadows end. Those edges are extremely important in making a figure read, and right now they're sort of all over the place. It's sort of hard to explain over text so see the Charles Bargue plates below for a visual example. You can see he clearly and simply defines his shadow patters before laying down tone. Also see the draw over below for more context Again, great job on these and keep up the good work!
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Charles Barque drawing Course 9
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Alex Sinclair
Alex Sinclairadded a new lesson
1mo
Patrick Ballesteros
Patrick Ballesterosadded a new lesson
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jollycooperation
Here are some 30 second gestures I did, I’m relatively new to figure drawing
E4094358 4F38 4790 9FB4 48E44B7EEC84
AC0E892E 5E72 4898 8CDA BEE77685C92F
2D33188D 2121 4CAE AAC4 8A7A5A73B38E
740CB6CF 461F 4355 B2C9 CC6D451AC484
9F5656EB F341 419D 91FE EE0A6171CC44
9C70CCFD 237D 4745 9817 4CAFC94DD686
3E624422 2B38 4AC2 B8DA BB870052BEDE
28FD20C4 4C31 4C9D 9CEE 0BCCA517F819
BA924A37 2A95 4C8F 839D 7BFF933D2919
F1BA631C 6819 4418 A2FF 47DFC334E850
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Kristian Nee
Hey Jolly! Nice job on these, you're effectively simplifying your lines and avoiding contour. Getting over trying to draw exactly every line you see is one of the most difficult parts of learning how to figure draw. So good job! What I would say is a few things: 1. Though these are successful first attempts figure drawing, I'd say these lean on the simpler side to their detriment. There's no form here to push the gesture of the pose, making them all feel very flat. What I'd recommend is watching Stan's videos Bean Assignment Examples – Foreshortening. I know these are 45 second drawings which limits the amount of stuff you can do in that time, but that being said small indications of form can go a long way. Stan's How to Draw Gesture helped me a lot with this stuff, I'd recommend that too. 2. Your drawings don't have much energy to them. Though you are capturing the general "story" of the pose, the lack of force behind your lines doesn't make it feel like they're standing in space or moving at all. To combat this, use your arm as much as you can when you draw (as opposed to your wrist). This will force you to think of the drawing as a whole, while also allowing you to put more energy into your lines. I'd recommend watching @Mike Mattesi's videos on Drawing Dynamic Figures – The FORCE Method. 3. Line follow through could use some work. This is related to both of the points above, but I'll address it more directly. You are successfully using the lines correctly, but they're missing the follow through that would take them to the next level. See the draw overs below for what I mean. In the first one, you can see I took your drawing and simplified it to two lines, a step by step, and threw in a super rough indication for the pelvis. I've also attached a diagram by @Stan Prokopenko and two 5 minute quick sketch pages by @Erik Gist.
primary secondary tertiary forms of the arm
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Kristian Nee
Hey @Atharva Lotake! I've also been playing around with AI art and I've been incredibly impressed. I've heard a lot of the same fears that you noted below, people's jobs are at risk, or who owns the images themselves? It's a really scary time, and I would be surprised if every visual artist isn't thinking the same thing. That being said, I believe that in spite of it being a very powerful tool, there will be room for artists in the future. I believe that mainly because it is fundamentally a tool. Painting directly might be easily replicable, but that doesn't mean change the fact that choosing what to paint is also an incredibly important part of the art creation process. I was talking to @Scott Flanders about this and he brought up a good point. Artists are the ones who will be able to feed in the prompts to make interesting images and do interesting things with the tool. As technology has progressed there have always been naysayers against innovation. The same thing happened when photoshop started developing as a painting tool, or when instead of making your oil paints out of burnt umber from the ground there were just people who made the paint for you. Sure there might not be concept art jobs in the future, but there will still be a need for idea generation and image making. The composition, anatomy, color and value skills your learning will still be useful in 1000 years, that's why they call them fundamentals.
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Kristian Nee
Hey @Paul Z! That's a really tough, frustrating and extremely common problem to be experiencing. One thing that I think would help is focusing on simplifying your shapes. I looked at the drawings you posted on your profile, and noticed a few things. They're really solid proportionally, and anatomy wise, but you're over complicating your drawing in the structure phase. @Erik Gist used to tell me that at the stage in the drawings you have in your profile, you should only be using C S and I lines to describe forms. I'd recommend watching Stan's Q&A – Gesture vs Contour and Scribbly Lines video where he talks about that concept. Attached is a diagram Stan made of the sort of thing I'm talking about, as well as some of Erik's life drawings.
primary secondary tertiary forms of the arm
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Kristian Nee
Hey @bycristian123, based on the way I've seen my teachers at the Watts Atelier and @Stan Prokopenko draw, I've never seen them use a line like that for drawing balanced poses. It's a good idea for getting the general action or gesture of the pose, but it's not necessarily essential to include. That being said, if it works for you keep doing it! Drawing is all about experimenting and seeing how things work. If you find a new concept that makes it easier for you to draw, own it! There's no wrong way of drawing if you get the desired results. Good job on these by the way! The gesture on these are really solid
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Kristian Nee
Hey @gwench! These are really solid, stylistically they're working and they gesture / proportion are getting there. The things I'd say are to keep and eye on your proportions, and "draw through" more. Proportions - If you look at the rib cage on the left drawing, it's a bit too small. In terms of anatomy, I can tell you're starting to gain some real knowledge. That being said, the less proportionally correct your basic shapes are (rib cage in this example) the anatomy won't be able to connect properly. "Draw through" - It looks like a bunch of your basic shapes aren't working as a whole. For example the legs and the hips seem to be on different planes of the body, so when you start rendering / adding anatomy you'll run into that problem of things not connecting properly. Drawing through means drawing the shapes all the way instead of stopping when it is overlapped by something. I recommend re-watching stan's How to Draw Structure in the Body – Robo Bean Misc notes - You're getting there, but your lines are a bit stiff. Adding the boxes does help for making the forms read, but it can kill the story of the drawing. I'd recommend trying to simplify your drawings a bit.
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Stan Prokopenko
Stan Prokopenkoadded a new lesson
3mo
Stan Prokopenko
Stan Prokopenkoadded a new lesson
3mo
Kristian Nee
Hey Bfizz! @Liandro has a great response to your question. To add on to what he said, the goal is to focus on the flow of the drawing. I know this is difficult if you're not quite comfortable with proportions yet, but once you do it'll feel completely natural. Don't be too hard on yourself! This stuff takes years to learn, and you feeling like your drawings aren't what you want them to be is totally natural. If you'd like to recreate what he's doing I'd recommend to keep going with the course. The way it's meant to be done is that you do each section to the degree you're able, and then you go back and review it again and improve every time. One more note, I think it's important to consider the sort of art you'd like to do in general. Do you want to be a fine artist, with more academic realistic proportions, or a comic book artist with more extreme anatomy and posing, or anything in between. The sort of art you'd like to do definitely could answer the question on what to focus on when studying. An exercise to get better at flowing in a drawing I'd recommend is @Tim Gula's Meditation for Artists – The Automatic Drawing Technique. This sort of thing is important for artists of all levels, and really gets you warmed up for some nice flowing lines. Hope this helps!
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Stan Prokopenko
Stan Prokopenkoadded a new lesson
3mo
Stan Prokopenko
Stan Prokopenkoadded a new lesson
3mo
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