Jo Sheridan
Jo Sheridan
Nottingham UK
An academic engineer who has hit my creative streak late. Influences: Alan Lee, John Howe, film scores and art, dystopian teen worlds, portraits
Zoungy Kligge
Clear all is already a feature. Tap the bell icon and it's at the top
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Jo Sheridan
Hmm - I just assumed that I had missed something here - but I still can't see what you are referring to... the top bar of my notifications just says "NOTIFICATIONS" like this in capitals, and there is an " X " to close on the right hand side... and I still show 5 unread notifications when I have been through and clicked on every post in here...
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Jo Sheridan
Thx
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Jo Sheridan
Hi there, I often find it hard to lose the red dot that shows how many new notifications there have been, even if I scroll down through and click on them all one by one - would a "Clear All" button at the top be a good idea? Jo
Alberto Grubessi
The easy answer is: do a lot but always try to make the best work you can. This allows you to have a lot of practice, make a lot of mistakes and also have good art. In my case i'm studing by myself with the goal of becoming an illustrator, so i'm drawing every day (mostly exercise and challenges that focus on the subject that i'm studing) and i try to make each week a completed llustration appling those concepts that i have learned and trying something that i don't know yet. Naturally you probably won't like your art but this method provides a costant challenge. Also i would advise to use a curriculum of subjetcs so that you can understand at what point you are in and don't get frustrated. Hope it helps XD
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Jo Sheridan
I like this too - I have an instagram account and I try to draw something worth posting around every two weeks - so that is 10 days or so of input, videos, test sketches, then some concentrated output
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Art Anderson
Hell yes! I have noticed that for me drawing fast or failing more, and quickly, has not helped. Whatever I am learning or working on I do it the best I can and take my time. I feel much better about the out comes which I feel is important to keeping up my self esteem and enjoy the process. One other thought I have is some things need to be quick like gestures or thumbnail drawing. Those should be quick and dirty. Hope this helps.
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Jo Sheridan
Absolutely agree with this - I am constantly surprised by how easy it is to draw things that are absolutely awful (normally when I am working quickly) and I think that I have learnt absolutely nothing - and that is really depressing! By taking my time and taking drawings to the point where I am pleased with them is much more satisfying - However I am starting to learn the difference between being pleased with a "finished" drawing, and being pleased with a gesture study, or a gesture and shape drawing (i.e. before shading), so I also think having the end goal in mind as you start a drawing helps a lot.
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Liandro
@Jo Sheridan Hey, Jo! Things have sure gotten more exciting around here, haha! I thought I had an idea of how much a newborn would demand from us parents, but, wow... you only know once you experience the real deal. Anyway, I've been slowing down on work a bit, it's true, but still trying to find a little time to show up here now and then. So let's get to it! I think your composition looks good, I really like how you managed the contrast in his hair's textures on the different sides of the portrait, as well as the values on the background. I think you achieved a great degree of likeness, and I'd even say you enhanced his facial expression (I like the expression in your drawing better than in the reference). Two things that call my attention as areas that could have adjustments made are: 1) The nose: I think its lacking a little bit of structure. I see it lacks structure in the reference too - the photo is a front view, and the lighting isn't helping show volume on the nose. So maybe you could go beyond the reference a little bit and give a slightly stronger hint of the anatomical planes. 2) The eyes: it seems to me they might have gotten a tiny bit too big. I really like how defined the edges and contrasts are though, it really helps draw our attention there. One more thing is I think you did a great job designing the shape and forms of the hair mass with all these loose strands and thin locks - definitely not an easy part! Hope this helps. Let me know if you have other thoughts! Keep it up o/
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Jo Sheridan
@Liandro Hi Liandro, thanks so much for the feedback! - It just amazes me - you do the same thing every time - the areas you spot that need work - are the areas where I have really struggled to decide what to do. I am finally starting to understand this idea of using a reference and not just copying it - and all my final edits I did without my reference to just get it looking how I wanted it. This didn't however include the nose as I was very aware that there were two light sources, one from each side, so I couldn't get my head around where any darker shadows would be... I'll have another think about that. As for the eyes, its a good job you didn't see this a few days ago as I did make them quite a bit smaller from where they originally were! Then you realise that it all effects everything else as the corners of the mouth were measured from the edges of the pupil, so as they got smaller, the mouth got bigger, and that made it look so much better! I'm really pleased you like the hair, I enjoyed doing that bit :) Have fun with your newborn - I have a lovely mental image of you striding towards the sea with your bodyboard under one arm and your baby under the other... good to get them started early!! :) Jo.
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Jo Sheridan
Sorry, it wasn't uploading so now you get this three times!!
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Jo Sheridan
Hi there, I have tried a few times this morning tried to upload a post with images to the Art Lounge - when you click Create Topic, a pop-up says - do you really want to leave without saving, and whether you click on Leave or Stay - it assumes you are leaving and nothing gets uploaded. Jo.
Jo Sheridan
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Fan Art
1mo
This was a good distraction from the Anatomy class and Loomis Head drills. Critiques welcome. Jo
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Jo Sheridan
added a new topic
Fan Art
1mo
I get the feeling that Fan Art might be looked down on a bit in the Art world, but after weeks of input and Loomis Heads I decided to go for a bit of Fan Art output. I lost count of the amount of times I messed this up before the block-in looked even remotely like him but I am pretty pleased with this end result. Be happy to get some feedback. @Liandro I know you are pretty busy right now, but I would appreciate some comments if you have time. Jo
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Jo Sheridan
added a new topic
Fan art
1mo
I am a bit of a newbie to all this, but I get the impression that fan art is perhaps looked down on a bit in the art world - but I find it a real release from the Anatomy studies and shading drills. After many weeks of input, I went for a bit of fan art output - I lost count of the amount of false starts I had with this guy, but I found it incredibly hard to block him in - when I finally got something I was happy with my paper was all scruffy and worn, so I traced out my shadow shapes and transferred him onto a new piece of paper using old-fashioned carbon paper - and pressed way to hard, so when I needed to amend things later on I was fighting against my lines - hey ho - I would be interested to know what you think. @Liandro I know you are busy at the moment, but would value your feedback. Jo
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Jo Sheridan
Enjoyed this one... I have a quote for Marshall leading on from his comment about working in Universities - something I heard early on in my own university career - I was warned about the ferocity of competition between staff and this was encapsulated in the phrase - "The battles are so fierce because the rewards are so small!" - and he was right.
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Jo Sheridan
Well @Stephen Bauman, I am probably not really finished - but emotionally I have taken this as far as I can... it has taken a few more stages than you show in your videos, because as I stepped back to admire my finished work a couple of weeks ago I thought - "Oh no, that eye just isn't right", so I had to come back in to remodel it and was oh so close to just scrubbing it all out with black paint and giving up - however I resisted the temptation and kept refining and this is where I have ended up... I have really struggled to eliminate the shine off the surface in my photograph, so to do this I have ended up with an image that does underplay my half-tones a bit - in the real thing she is a darker value on the right hand side. I would be keen to hear your thoughts as to how I have got on. I attach my Grisaille and also my pencil sketch
Olivia fin g
Olivia 2 fin
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Liandro
Sounds like a topic that might interest you, @Jo Sheridan!
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Jo Sheridan
Definitely @Liandro - I'll add it to my ever growing list.... I never thought that one of my biggest problems would be managing to prioritise the hundreds of learning resources available to me - if I watched everything I was interested in there would be no time to do any art! I'm currently working through some resources on the NMA website by Steve Houston which are just brilliant for beginners - I'm learning loads about colour theory and the Brown School v The Impressionists and how and why they are different - I think this is fundamental stuff that is easy to miss - attached a couple of value studies that I'm pretty pleased with...
IMG 20210713 144538
IMG 20210719 193836 037
shapes
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Jo Sheridan
Hi @Jan D. I really like this!! I love the way you have put the background in and the nose and eye shadows are great. I have to admit to being a beginner myself so can't offer you much of a critique - After about a month I am still struggling to get beyond really limited colour pallets, so I think you are doing great... I don't see the reflections on your photo, but I too am struggling with how to photograph oil paintings without reflections - and I'm not sure its the camera that is the problem. I am also doing SB's classical portraiture course, and am finding it OK to be honest - I have had to do a bit of "Googling" of some of the terms that he uses - "oiling out" for example as it it not directed at beginners, but because you can watch the whole thing in real time from start to finish you do learn a lot. What I find really interesting is the time you invest in things that are not the final picture - the initial graphite sketch and the Grisaille stage (where I am currently hanging out and trying desperately not to mess things up) all take ages, and you realise that you haven't even got to the final painting in real colours stage - but it does open your eyes to a whole different way of working - so in answer to your question I think it is OK to try it, but take it slow and although you might not produce the most fantastic painting yourself, you will certainly learn loads.
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Jo Sheridan
So... I had another go... and I think this is going in the right direction - thanks so much to you all for your great advice and help here - I tried not to overwork this, and have now I think got a better range of colours - as to whether they are actually in the right places or not on my figure is another question entirely :) I have included my pallet so you can see how this ended up - so much better than my original muddy mess - although I think I have a lot to learn about keeping it tidy and trying to group my warms/cools/lights/darks... The other learning point I have uncovered as well is the skill of taking a photograph of an Oil Painting - seeing as I paint in my shed where I have lots of big windows this is a nightmare for taking a photograph without reflections and shine on the surface - I do have a DSLR camera, but its so long since I have used the manual exposure settings that there was a lot of guess work going on here...
ZF 2.1
ZF 22
ZF P2
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Marcus Bäckström
Looks like you're still painting in grayscale, don't be afraid use more of the yellow and red when mixing. Something that might help you get more comfortable with the colors is to do a colorwheel using the palette, sure helped me when i first started painting with color
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Jo Sheridan
That is such a good idea!! - Thanks Marcus
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Jo Sheridan
This is amazing effort, and the really cool thing is you took the time to stop and work out what it was that you were learning which is almost as important as the learning itself - I was in a meeting once at work years ago, when my boss asked me to listen to the conversation and "capture the learning" - I hadn't got a clue what he meant, but I just wrote everything down and then tried to analyse it afterwards, and then it all made sense - now I almost do it without thinking about it - it really helps you understand your progress because with art it is sometimes quite hard to see what you are learning behind all the sketches on scraps of paper lying around when there is no masterpiece in sight...
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Jo Sheridan
Oh my goodness, this is great that you kept going with this - it shows what you can do when you put your mind to something - its quite inspiring really...
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Gino Datuin
Hey jo, Awesome first attempt, especially with such a dynamic pose. I would say to just continue practicing your color mixing. Your painting compared to the reference, although moving in the right direction, is very muddy. I find what helps me when I get confused with color in the painting process is asking the right questions and making the proper adjustments based on the answer to those questions, such as: What is the dominant color for this mix? Is it too saturated or too dull? Is it too light or too dark? Etc. This just gives me a clearer picture on what color I'm looking for and not just mindlessly mixing paint. Also check your values often. If you push the darks in the hair more to the value in the photo, it can open up the painting to a much more finished look. Hoped that helped and happy painting! Gino
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Jo Sheridan
Thanks for the encouragement - its interesting that the colours get more and more muddy as you go along, and I got to the stage where even putting on neat black didn't really darken anything - my approach here was to stop and think - I'll wait for it to dry, then I can start in again... will this work?
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Yiming Wu
It looks nice to me... The challenge here is the lack of very cool colour, which might be substituted with black shades. I think here the problem might be "trying to add pigment to pull mixed colour in a direction you want", I suffer from this a lot TBH, The solution is also simple, say if you want 5%A and 95%B, just dab your mixture of A and mix with a glob of B instead of adding B to the mixture. But I'm lazy so I don't really do this, my colour ends up muddying. Also maybe you might want to invert the warm/cool relationship in your painting? because in the ref the body is much warmer than the background, but in the painting the body is seldom "yellower".
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Jo Sheridan
I love that word "glob" it is perfect to describe oil paint! Thanks for the advice to help with my colours, its great to have something to work with as a guide. Thanks, Jo
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