jacob_f
jacob_f
Earth
jacob_f
Loved the video, thanks for putting this together. I have some ideas on negotiating I'd like to share, but I have to caution that I've never sold a piece of art in my life. However, I have sold creative services as a software designer for almost a decade. I'm definitely curious to know what @Stan Prokopenko and @Marshall Vandruff think of these strategies. For each scenario I'm focusing on the student working for exposure being approached by a potential buyer for commissioned work. This scenario is most interesting to me since it's where I'm at in my art career. For each scenario let's say the artist values the work at $200 and the buyer starts the negotiation at $100. (1) The "I'm busy" method. You could say "hey buyer, I'll sell to you for $100 but that's honestly low for me and I have a lot of other projects, so it's going to take me a while to get around to working on this. If you paid $200 I'd give this a higher priority and guarantee delivery by x." I like this one because it signals to the buyer what you're actually worth and still gives them the option to commission you for their initial price. It's similar to Marshall's "table of delivery dates and prices" method but more simplified. (2) The "negotiate against themselves" method. You could say "hey buyer, that price is too low, do you have another number in mind?". They might say a number higher than you were even thinking, which would be fantastic and really motivate you to do a stellar job. It also sets your base price higher which makes future negotiations much easier. Obviously this could only happen if you refrain from posting your prices anywhere. I'd be curious to know if that's a good move or not. (3) The "BOGO" method. "Sure, I can do $100 if you agree to buy 2 pieces instead of 1". It's still more work for the artist, but like they said in the video, the experience is more important, so why not secure an extra deal if you're taking a lower rate? (4) The "referral method". "I tell you what, I'll sell it to you now for $200 but if you can get 2 of your fiends to buy a piece from me I'll give you a $50 discount per referral and I'll extend the same deal to them." This has the potential to really get your work in more places because your incentivizing the buyers even more to share your work and get more people to buy. At some point you have to raise your base price as Stan pointed out in the video, at which point you could combine this with method #1 to steadily increase your base price. I'd definitely welcome some critique / feedback on these methods. P.S. Like I said at the beginning, I've never sold art, but I've either used or seen other use the strategies above for selling creative work / services. They don't always work and yes you do run the risk of turning someone off, but honestly fighting for your bread is something I think most buyers will respect and appreciate. Often times I find the buyer's price is based on ignorance anyways and they might welcome an education which makes the story of how they got their piece all the more interesting but I digress.
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jacob_f
Each monster comes from it's own 9x12 sheet and I've already gone through a cutting phase to pick out the ones I think are still fun / worth pushing. I left some notes on how I think I want to push each one thinking about colors, effects, and possible behavior. I'd love some feedback on where I need to be pushing things more @Scott Flanders .
Demons for critique
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jacob_f
Sorry, one more thing. I got some feedback that most of the characters seem like they would be hard to animate / it's hard to tell how they would move. Is that something I should be conscious of at this stage of the game if I wanted to eventually evolve these characters for say, a game?
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jacob_f
Whoops, sorry. Looks like the export was too small for that first one to read the notes. This one should be legible.
Demon for critique large
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jacob_f
Hey @Scott Flanders great course. I'm having a ton of fun already. I plan to follow everything sequentially but was curious to know if there's a lesson in here on your digital painting technique. I'm trying to practice digital technique and would love to know how you create the look of those final pieces.
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