Isaiah
Isaiah
Northampton, MA
Lifelong hobbyist here to relearn how to draw from the experts.
Isaiah
Thank you for the reminder regarding your website and your art journey. I have visited your website on a handful of occasions. Each time, I have been greatly inspired by both the project and by the art itself. It is certainly a worthwhile place to visit, for anyone starting out on, or restarting, their art journey. This time around, I was admiring your digital environment paintings particularly.
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Isaiah
As promised: attempt #2. Some more geometric shape. Some more animal simplifications. For my animal drawings, my initial simplifications, again, were too elaborate. To offset this, I made a second simplification of each in digital pencil.
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Isaiah
Did a skull study for a September study challenge that I am taking part in. This was for prompt #4: skull. (Duh!)
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Isaiah
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Another September study challenge prompt (i.e. prompt #3: everyday object) which coincided with a Proko assignment I have been meaning to do. I did this last evening as a still life in graphite. After scanning, I enhanced it digitally. I duplicated the image into two layers. I momentarily made the top layer invisible and then applied a smudge tool to the bottom layer, until it looked somewhat like thick paint. I then converted the top layer to multiply mode and set it back to visible. The purpose in this was to improve the coverage and uniformity within the values groups, without losing the texture of the graphite on paper. Next, I used a handful of adjustment layers (Brightness/Contrast, Levels Adjustment, and Tone Curve) to move the value groups into the value ranges I thought appropriate. Throughout the night and morning, I came back to the drawing several times to make adjustments. My main areas of concern were the value transitions in in the halftones and form shadow. I also wanted to get the edges around the egg to be as sharp as possible whilst still being edges and not lines. Looking over the image now, I would like to continue making adjustments to the halftones and form shadow, as well as to the edges. For now, however, I am moving on to other studies.
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Isaiah
I am currently working on a study challenge for September, created by YouTube art vlogger, Kelsey Rodriguez. Prompt #2 for the challenge is "value study." Since this prompt overlaps with the subject of this lesson, I figured I would post my study here. I used quite a lot of gradations and blending brushes in this study. In addition to studying the values and "effect" of the image, I was also experimenting to see how I might replicate the lighting phenomena in the photograph. Since I do not have much experience digitally painting, pushing the rendering slightly is helping me to learn how to use my layers and brushes. In the end, I think I found a good starting strategy for painting this type of aerial image. In these value studies, I am never color picking from the photograph. I only color pick from the center swatches. For the swatches, I can test the values by painting over the photograph on another layer and visually checking whether they match.
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Isaiah
My attempt, for now. I drew a handful of geometric shapes freehand & judging perspective by eyesight. Looking over them a second time, I could work more on making my convergences accurate. When I started on the frog, I thought it was looking pretty good, and I got carried away. As a result, it is a bit more complex than was the original intent of the assignment. Another motive I had in doing this assignment is that a YouTube art vlogger I follow, Kelsey Rodriguez, is doing a community study challenge for September. I was not intending to do a challenge this month, and so, I do not know how long I will last in the challenge. However, many of the challenge prompts overlap with Proko assignments I've been meaning to do. So, I will try to make good use of my motivation while it lasts... I am counting the frog towards prompt #1: simplification.
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Isaiah
My previous attempt was not in the intended spirit of the assignment. So, I have redone it. 100 torso beans. A 1-minute timer for each. I used Japanese pose-books for reference.
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Marco Sordi
2022/8/15. Hi everybody. This is a concept for a trading card game. The card's character is a Samurai known as "The Golden Samurai" from the gold mask he wears in battle. Before moving into the card-frame design, I'd like to have some opinions about the work: composition, proportions, lights, etch. Thanks a lot.
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Isaiah
No critique from me. (I'm not qualified to critique an illustration of this level) But, in the way of encouragement, I will say that your rendering keeps getting better and better with each illustration you make. I could be misremembering, but I seem to recall that, a while back, you mentioned wanting to work on differentiating materials more effectively through texture. Well, I really do get a sense that the leather is leather, the metal is metal, the chord is chord, and so on.
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Isaiah
I did the initial sketch for this as an accuracy study in a previous lesson. Prior to shading, I cleaned up the sketch and corrected some proportional errors I had noticed during my earlier self-critique. In order to better work "from imagination", I inverted the paint scheme of the vehicle relative to the reference photo. Additionally, I pulled the light source slightly forward of the vehicle, so that in the drawing the light would illuminate the face of it. For this assignment, I shaded almost exclusively using the halfway-to-black method. All tones are flat, except for some airbrush in and around the undercarriage. I intend to revisit this drawing again for the "Creating Realism" lesson. At that time, I will attempt to account for all of the modeling factors.
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Isaiah
An alternate version of my halfway-to-black study. Most of the work I put into this second version had to do with cleaning up the edges, so that I could discard the line sketch. I also made further tweaks to the perspective, proportions, as well as to the light and shadow shapes. Lastly, I returned the car to a more traditional paint scheme for this model; a friend of mine, to whom I showed the previous version, seemed disappointed by the white paint scheme. With the edges now cleaned up, I am ready to apply the modeling factors. The next time I post this image, it should be more fully rendered.
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Dorian Iten
📣 My "Drawing Fundamentals" package has a new cover and new lesson images. 👉 https://www.proko.com/course/drawing-fundamentals-accuracy-values-light
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Isaiah
Stan said to draw the Loomis head 100 times... So, I took up that challenge. The attached image represents 14 pages from my sketchbook. Most of the angles were from a Japanese action pose book. Others were from imagination or from figures I have in my hobby room. Repeating a fundamental exercise so many times made me feel as though I was really putting in quality mileage. I'll need to do similar 100x marathons for other fundamental exercises. My understanding of the Loomis head evolved during this run. (Hopefully, not in the direction of solidifying misconceptions). For instance, at the beginning, I was sometimes making the front of the face too flat. Also, I began the run depicting the plane change line framing the faces as a c-curve which was always concave towards the ears (i.e., It "sweeps" toward the ears.). I eventually noticed that, from the front view, this c-curve was concave towards the face (i.e., It "wraps" around the face.). Using the 3D model provided in the course material. I discovered that the transition in the direction of concavity, visually, changes at the 3/4 view. At the 3/4 view, this curve is a straight line. ...Another important visual transition that occurs at the 3/4th view, is that the oval of the head side plane perfectly touches the outer circle of the cranium sphere. If you rotate the head from this point towards the side view, a gap appears separating the side plane oval and the outer circle and the side plane oval starts moving to the center point of the outer circle. Alternatively, if you rotate the head towards the front view, the side oval begins to "chop off" the outer circle of the cranium sphere. From some angles, I chose to depict the side planes as "toeing-in" towards the face slightly (such that the side plane ovals are visible from the front view). This is based on something I noticed while practicing from another drawing resource. I only feel 70% confident that this is correct, though. Towards the end of the run, I experimented with depicting the cheek line as an "s-curve" from certain angles. I do not feel confident that this was correct.
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Christopher Lebreault
Meant to post this some time ago. On to Landmarks next.
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Isaiah
These are great!
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Isaiah
At the moment, I lack the speed and accuracy to make timed sketches which I would be comfortable posting publicly. For now, I approached this assignment on my own terms. By the second page, however, I was able to lightly lay down the ovals of the ribcage and pelvis, using the overhand pencil grip, with relatively good accuracy. So, I may be able to do (presentable) timed sketches sooner than I thought. With respect to proportions and accuracy, I found myself prone to: not making the pelvis tall enough; placing the belly button too low on the torso; and generally overexaggerating all horizontal distances. I fixed some proportional errors at the pencil stage, and some others at the digital stage. Looking at these torso sketches now, I also see errors with respect to ribcage vs pelvis orientation: Page 1, right-middle image; I did not show how the model's pelvis juts forward. The contour line of the pelvis should be concave down. The mid-line and the bottom of the pelvis redrawn to show correct orientation. Page1, left-bottom image; the orientation seems correct to me, except that the drawing is rotated slightly in 3D space about the longitudinal axis. Page 1, center-bottom image; the pelvis should tilt more towards the left. The mid-line is incorrect. Page 2, left-top image; I did not capture the slight rightward tilt of the model's pelvis. Overall, I think I would do this assignment better a second time around.
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Isaiah
Your digital paintings are always very instructive. I think of them as a sort of demo of what is possible for someone who pays attention to the fundamentals. I like the stylistic nuances as well. The TV fuzz, and the way the gradient and stomp effect look like they came from 1950's era special effects.
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Isaiah
Asked for help
I definitely have a lot of growing to do regarding gesture sketch. I practiced for a few hours last weekend in my physical sketchbook. It was difficult for me to put the lines in the right places on first stroke. So, many of the sketches came out wonky. Eventually, I gave myself permission to scribble around a bit until I found the blend of proportion and gesture I sought from each pose. This seemed helpful in some ways, though those drawings were obviously quite messy. For the sake of presentability, the attached drawings are digital. Stan's drawings in the lesson appeared to come at three levels of complexity: the least complex being a sort of "gesture skeleton"; the next being a sort of "gesture outline"; and the most complex being a sort of quick sketch, with some anatomy and contour, but with gesture applied to said anatomy and contour. The first 2 pages are "gesture skeletons." The last 2 pages were meant to be "gesture outlines," but I got a carried way and added some aspects of anatomy and contour. I wanted the proportions to be relatively believable. And so, I used accuracy techniques that I've been practicing in Dorian Iten's Fundamental's course. Hence, there is little exaggeration in these poses.
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Marco Sordi
2022/7/15. Hi everybody. This is the Card Game version of the character I designed and posted yesterday. The card design is mine too. Actually I had lot of fun in making it. Thanks and goodnight.
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Isaiah
That looks really cool.
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Isaiah
And here is my complex value study using value similarity. A Doré woodblock illustration was my reference.
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Francis Edward Batuto
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Isaiah
They are a good looking pair.
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Isaiah
At the beginning of the year, I retired from my esports league to reconnect with my drawing hobby. Since then, I've been meaning to do a tribute piece for my friends in "Bee Squadron:" Maize, Fatboy, Crazy-D, Fox, & Hawkeye.
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Isaiah
I was right up against the deadline last night. So, I didn't compose a full message to accompany the submission. But, I want to thank @Luca Funckner for giving feedback early on in the compositional phase. Applying his feedback, I was able to dedicate more visual area to the action scene. I was also able to fix some issues I had arranging objects according to the rule of thirds.
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Ana
Hi everyone, color is a challenge for me and I have been learning a lot from Marco's channel, so could not resist participating. I'm new to digital and fell into a few traps along the way, but I am really amazed by what one can do with the media - I'll definitively continue doing digital! My inchworm is still rough and the background is not what I intended, but it is already very late for me, I have to stop here. Thank you to Marco for all the great teachings and to the Proko team for this challenge! Thank you also to @Isaiah for helping me to work out the perspective.
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Isaiah
Hey Ana, it came out looking great! Good work on the perspective. I am also digging the overall color and texture of the apple... My favorite part, though, is the expression on the little creature's face. It's thinking, "I've hit the mother load!"
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