oliver lindenskov
oliver lindenskov
Earth
Colton Almos
Really struggling with this exercise, if anyone could give me some pointers I’d really appreciate it
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oliver lindenskov
I'm not saying that your are not ready for this. Not at all. But if you're up for it I would probably spend some time with perspective and fundamentals (drawabox.com for example). This would help you get a feel of 3dimensional form in your structures and a bit more confidence in your line quality 😁 Another little pointer: hair is mostly a graphic thing, so treat it as one mass (either flat or 3d). Personally, I would have drawn an envelope or outline for the hair with as few simple lines as possible (CSI curves)
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Atharva Lotake
Hello Guys, I just completed the Joints assignments and was looking forward to get some constructive criticism on my assignment. Thank you to anyone who takes the time to help me out. Thank you!
Joints Study 1
Joints Study 2
Joints Study 3
Joints Study 4
Joints Study 5
Joints Study 6 improved
Joints Study 6
Joints Study 8
Joints Study 7.5
Joints Study 7
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oliver lindenskov
Hey you! I think these look like you have a great understanding of most of the simplifications of the skeleton. although, I do think your palms should taper down towards the wrist, so instead of being the same width at the knuckles and at the wrist, it should be narrower at the wrist. hope this makes sense. :)) good job
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oliver lindenskov
Here's my entry :)) I used photos 6,11,14 and 16
DSC 0331
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Steve Lenze
Hey Oliver, Nice job on this still life. I think you did a great job on turning the form on these, and the texture you implied with the highlight works good. The only thing that jumps out to me is the cast shadows, they are very dark and my eye goes right to them. If you have light bouncing into the shadow of the fruit, it would also bounce into the cast shadow, lightening them. Remember, the eye is drawn to the area of highest contrast, and those shadows are really drawing my attention away from the fruit. Hope this is helpful :) The answer to your other question is: Yes, you can always sell your art!
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oliver lindenskov
Thanks, @Steve Lenze it totally does
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oliver lindenskov
I did this sketch/still life the other day. The painting in painted directly/opaquely on grey paper primed with shellac. And it seems a slight bit off to me. Any recommendations on improvements? One thing I have been thinking of is if the edge from light to dark is too sharp. Second question: does anyone here have an opinion on whether or not I could sell this? And even what price it could be sold at? The piece itself isn't very big (a bit under 10x10cm) Thanks in advance to anyone answering
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oliver lindenskov
I think you would benefit from doing more messurements or comparing angles and so on, but this is looking promising
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greypace
Can people actually draw anatomy that detailed from imagination? You gotta have a reference to do such an extensive task or idk how.
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oliver lindenskov
The big things like gesture are the most important, so you'll really med to be able to create a good gesture and/or skeleton to attach the muscles to, but if you know the anatomy and you are good at the other things it is definitely doable 😁
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oliver lindenskov
So you can really hold your pencil in any way you want depending on what you are trying to draw and probably most importantly what medium you are using, and as Dan said: proko and drawabox are great resources to learn that from and their differences. Most of the courses on proko though are not beginner friendly. You can do the figure course but anatomy isn't worth your time yet I would say. Since you are beginning, I am guessing you are pretty excited to get started, so I would start with something 'boring' such as drawabox.com and sprinkle in a few things you are passionate about. I would do some still lifes, choosing simple object that aren't too far from basic shapes such as spheres, cylinders and boxes. Simplification is very important and doing perspective (drawabox) alongside still lifes will help make it easier to understand why you are doing it. It will also make it easier to draw from photo reference in time since you should get a better understanding of volume and form. All that said though, if you don't listen to yourself keep grinding and don't adjust what you are doing to what you want at all, you'll burn out. Remember that you are doing drawing because you want to.it shouldn't be a chore for too Long at a time, especially not in the beginning. Hope this helps and I am happy to answer questions.
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oliver lindenskov
To me, nothing jumps out as needing fixing! I might desaturate the blue in the sky a bit, to remove some tension from that area, but otherwise it's rocking!
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oliver lindenskov
Honestly, I think your own feedback for yourself is pretty spot on, as far as I can tell. I would just do it again, and try to get the right tilt of the head and work on smoothnes of transitions. You have good unity in shadow and light shapes as far as I can tell. As Peter said a light lay in before you start adding tones makes it a lot easier to gauge things like tilt and proportions.
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oliver lindenskov
So, I think there's some really good feedback here already, and you should only pick a few of them to work on at a time. I have two points though. Each element reads fairly well on it's own, but you are missing reflected lights to bind it all together and feel like it's all in the same place. For example, the blue of the water would shine up on the underside of the fox, so I would add some blue in there and some orange from the fox onto the water. If you have something really colorful, you can try sitting next to a window and holding up the colorful thing next to the shadow side of the skin of your knee, this should illustrate what I mean :)) The second point is about the construction/perspective of the fox's head. Since the ear to our right is closer to the viewer it makes it easier to read if it is larger than the one on the left, so I would make it larger or make the left one a bit smaller. All that said, I think you did a pretty good job with a complex composition
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oliver lindenskov
I think you've done really well and it seems like you understand the origins and insertions of the muscles, mostly. The only thing I could find was that, for all I know, the origin of the medial head of the deltoid attaches a bit further in on the clavicle. (Mostly for our right one) Although likeness might be slightly off, it's not the purpose of this exercise. You have a believable human body with good gesture. It obviously doesn't hurt to do one more, but I think you could savely move on.
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oliver lindenskov
I think the rythm you found for the right leg in the first four gestures you did would work really well for the outside of the thigh, but I would add another gesture line going from the knee down along curve of the shin bone. And stop the one for the leg at the knee. Also, it's really great that you test of where the limits are for exaggeration, 'cause you can't exaggerate infinitely without loosing believability.
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Dan B
Day 9. Notes: Caught up ever so slightly getting six done today. I am quite, quite sick of doing sculptured dudes with beards! Quite. I'm finding too many poses in this challenge are a) sculptured guys with beards, b) sculptures and c) slightly off straight on to about 20 degrees). It could do with more variety. I'm also finding I'm committing more time to drawing with this challenge, where previously I'd kind of wander off after a while to play games or other distractions. I like having this focus. Almost halfway, phew. Also had fun trying to do my favourite traditional style digitally: charcoal/carbon with some pastel (wrens). Do bird heads count as portraits? :p Once I've completed the challenge I'm going to watch Ahmed's video of him drawing them all, but I don't want to watch it before I'm done so I don't start just copying his ideas. Help: The pen drawing (#36) was really hard with so much beard detail. How do you simplify that? It was so chaotic I just couldn't find shapes unlike #38.
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P6040507
wrens1
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oliver lindenskov
Hey Dan, I do realise that I advised you find a way of constructing the heads, and I think that looks to be working really well for you as far as alignment of features and feeling of form. Good job! However, for things like beards and large hair I sometimes find it easier to use an envelope and then work inward from there, but it might work better when you aren't using permanent mediums and can erase a lot. Cheering for you!
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Sketcher Ameya
I think it is really good but you need to shade little bit more darker.
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oliver lindenskov
Thanks! I will take that into consideration ☺️
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oliver lindenskov
Your gestures are looking pretty good, I think! :)) When you do exaggerate, though, you have to look out for the balance of the pose. If you are doing an active pose or a pose where the model is not standing/sitting this isn't as important. If you draw a straight vertical line (on a standing pose) from the pit of the neck (front view) or close to the 7th cervical (back view) it should fall in between the legs or in the middle of the ankle of the weight bearing leg if the weight is predominantly on one leg. You can see this in the poses you attached. If you look at the exaggerated gesture on the second image you uploaded (the one where she is leaning forward, looking behind a curtain) it would help the feel and balance of the pose if you moved the legs further to the left for example. Hope this helps :))
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pollypopcorn
Here's is Stan's tutorial on drawing hair https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHewz3JbKrQ. A few things to think about when drawing hair are to first focus on big value areas rather than individual hairs, remember the forms of the hair--both the big shape of the hair and head and of individual locks (for instance, curls are sometimes kind of like ribbons), and have areas with more texture and variation and others with less. You can also look at photographs and drawings people have done to see how they do hair.
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oliver lindenskov
Thanks, I'll go watch it :))
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Serena Marenco
Hi, actually for a sketch of this type the hair as you've done it isn't bad at all, you've suggested gesturing and volume succinctly and effectively. It's a good base to work on to define more details. However, unless you want to achieve a hyper realistic result, I would advise against concentrating too much on the hair or you'll risk getting what my drawing teacher used to call "hairdresser's posters" (I don't know if they're still in use, but when I was a little girl, in hairdressing salons there were always these posters with drawings in which every single lock was defined and polished). If you focus too much on the hair, you risk distracting attention from the face, so I suggest you take keep the rendering of the hair a little more simple than the rendering of the face. For this sketch I think the rendering of the hairs are good enough, it suggest them whitout steal the attention from the face :)
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oliver lindenskov
Thanks! 😁 I don't think I've ever seen those posters, but I could imagine what you mean. You make a good point :))
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oliver lindenskov
I would think about simplifying the different body parts (ribcage, pelvis, legs, etc.) into simple forms (cylinders, boxes, eggs, spheres) and ignoring other things such as muscles, breasts, contours and whatnot. This does require you to know something about those though. https://drawabox.com is a great resource for learning to draw forms in perspective.
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oliver lindenskov
Since you're trying to illustrate that many different muscles I think you should make each muscle group a specific color. It makes it easier to read, and makes you think a bit about what the bumps you see are and where they belong. It also forces you to analyze instead of copying.
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