Jose
Jose
Earth
Gabi H
I’m pretty sure the distance between vanishing points should always stay the same. There’s a gif on Draw a Box that explains this https://drawabox.com/lesson/1/17/rotation (it’s a rotating box, where you can see the vanishing points moving with the box). I think the distance needs to remain the same or else it would be like using different camera lenses. For example, if you take a picture using a wider lens (the objects look more distorted), take a picture using a long lens and try to put them together, it’s very obvious there not part of the same picture (moderndayjames explains lenses briefly in one of his videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XF5YuAK63I , about 4 minutes into the video). I tried to illustrate this using your example number 2, but more extreme. In my example, the green boxes look like they could be in the same scene and the blue boxes look like they could be in a different scene together. But together, the green and blue boxes have very different levels of distortions (because the vanishing points are not the same distance apart) so they don’t work together and make things look weird. Basically the lens stays the same, so the distance between the vanishing points stay the same. Hope this will be of some help! (ps I’m not sure if this is the best way to explain it, or if my explanation is 100% correct, but I’ve heard a lot of people who have much more experience talk about how the distance between vanishing points stays the same in a scene)
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Jose
6mo
You are correct that the green boxes and blue boxes look like they belong in a different scene because of the lens. However, both the green boxes should share the same green VPs. Same with the blue boxes, they should share the same blue VPs in your example.
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Jose
Both are wrong, that's not how perspective works. Boxes with the same orientation will share the same Vps. Remember, parallel lines converge at the same Vanishing point in perspective. If you are trying to rotate a box, then No the length for the VPs do not stay the same for each rotated box. I suggest looking at Scott Robertson "How to Draw" page 25. The two vanishing points for a box should meet at 90 degrees on the Station Point. You rotate that 90 from the station point to rotate a box. The VPs for the rotated box will vary in length due to basic common sense geometry. You'll get it when you see it. hope this helps.
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Jose
I suggest to draw in the station point. It will help you place the vanishing points and Cone of Vision properly instead of just guessing them. I find it difficult to explain without showing you. If you have Scott Robertson's book "How to Draw" I suggest to look at page 24-25 specifically. Also about that table, the book "Framed Perspective Vol.1" page 56 shows how to construct a table. hope this helps.
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