greypace
greypace
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dubshido
Hi friends, i started a while ago, did a few hundred of 30 sec gesture poses. Here are some of them, please comment and critique. Thank you very much. Martin Dubcek/dubcido
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greypace
These really look great. I can feel the weight and movement very well. Don't have much to say.
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Andrew Fischer
I have a question. When approaching gesture, do you think it's important to consider things like pencil posture? I notice in all of these videos the artist is holding their pencil in a certain pose, I typically hold my pencil as though I were writing. Any thoughts? This brings me to a follow up question. I can understand how this posture might make it easier to draw from the elbow or shoulder, but I'm drawing on a sketchbook in front of my computer! I was curious what kind of space everyone else here is drawing in, or perhaps what an instructor would recommend. Since I'm here, I'll ask my third question. If you're struggling with this section, and maybe you've spent a half hour on it or so, is the design of the course to move on to the next section for the night? or do we spend a night focusing on one particular portion? Thanks!
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greypace
There are two types of holding the pencil artists use that I know of. The overhand and the writing grip. You can check out proko's guide on how to hold a pencil both ways. The overhand grip is good for longer lines that have variation in thickness. The writing grip is more precise and for smaller marks. I find that the overhand grip is better for learning gesture and good for expressive figure drawing. But honestly it also depends on what art you want to create. If you want to do fine art pieces in the future I suggest overhand and if you want to do illustration or comics I suggest the writing grip. I suggest to use overhand first because it teaches you how to use your shoulder. I rarely use it now but it taught me alot.
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greypace
I've heard that there are generally two paths as an artist, to be a small part of something great or be a big part of something small. This is comparing a single animator for a film to an artist who makes his own illustrations. Although I love how personal the art of the individual is, I can't help but look at the glamour and masterpieces made by collaborative effort. But as someone who is a visionary, I am not very fond of working for someone else's dream. But if I work as an individual, there are heights that I simply cannot reach. To create some things with high execution, collaborative effort is needed. But in collaborative efforts, my control of what I want to make is limited. I feel like whatever choice I make, I will need to sacrifice things and not be satisfied. Well, not if I direct a film with hundreds of people working for me, but that's not gonna happen. This is just a rant, tell me if you have any thoughts.
yurishka
Hi everyone, here is my final drawing. I didn't go for Yoni because I really don't like the pose. I used the Conté Pierre Noire, it's a good discovery for me because I have no good feeling with the charcoal and yet wanted this kind of black. I used a brush to smooth the pigments (no charcoal powder in stock yet), helping me to reach the values. Paper is not smooth enough, so I felt like I could not add much details. Eyes were tricky to do. Generally speaking I am quite happy with the result even though it does not look very clean, pencil work being a bit sloppy. I think I can do better with more practice and more patience. What do you think about it? Please tell me if you need the reference.
P1000393
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greypace
Can't speak too much about anatomical accuracy. Pretty sure you know charcoal on rough paper is not easy to execute. Maybe get some newsprint instead. Overall for shading, I suggest you emphasize the core shadows and have more variation of value in the darks. The large blocks of the same black don't look appealing or realistic. Otherwise, great work!
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persona937
my attempt
robo bean ex
poses sekaaa
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greypace
I suggest for 4 and 5 to stick to the box. An advantage of the robo bean is conveying perspective and when you bend the forms too much it gets confusing. For 1 and 2 I'd say the proportions are a bit off but that'll come with time. Keep up the great work!
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anarion
Here are 2 pages of my two (or less) minute gestures. I think I am having the most trouble with 1) lines of action 2) simplification When I watch the step by step, some of them I can get pretty close but other times Stan draws lines that I would never be able to imagine. My question: would future lessons in this course help my gesture and should I continue to practice gesture as i incorporate the lessons? Or would it be better to really nail gesture before moving any further?
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greypace
All the lessons should reinforce each other. Going further will help you with gesture and vice versa. Gesture is still a key foundation though. Keep foundations close to you but also dapple with further lessons.
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Sonja Müller
I don't think it is necessary to start with traditional media. I am drawing since May last year now and I started with alcohol markes and some charcoal but switched very early to digital. Of course I have a looong way to go learning wise but I don't think I would be at a further point now if I had sticked to traditional media. To me the upsides of digital for learning weigh more than the upside of traditional (for me, very subjective!). I love playing with colors and imho I learned very fast how to use colors better because I could try everything freely in digital. I could try what happens if I darken the shadows, if I make the shadows blue, if I make one color more saturated ect. Without having to draw a whole new piece. Also for composition, I could quickly get a feeling which compoistion would work better, like make the character bigger or closer to something and so on. On the other hand you learn with traditional media to plan and to improvise. Because if a stroke is down it's mostly down and you have to work with it. So I think best way is to do both but that is very time comsuming. So I would say, try what you feel like. I myself learn quickest if I do something that I enjoy while pushing my limits. Again this is all very 'my point of view'.
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greypace
Thanks! I can see how digital can be faster for learning and experimentation. I think I'm still worried about the technique of "brushstrokes" that I might miss if I don't do traditional.
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greypace
I have been honing my skills in graphite/charcoal for a while and it is going well. I envision to eventually use digital for finished pieces. I have tried traditional painting(gouache) several times and I have made no progress. I'm probably just complaining but right now traditional painting makes no sense to me. I hate mixing colors and how messy the paint can be. Am I really missing out if I skip straight from drawing to digital?
greypace
I am thinking of transitioning from traditional to digital. I want to first gather some artists to learn and take inspiration from. One artist I've found is WLOP. Any other digital artists you guys like?
piano 1 by wlop de4zwtf pre
Jessica Harrison
These are looking good! I think the first one is my favorite. Overall the proportions and structure are looking good. Be careful with the pelvis of letting it get too small. It's a good deal bigger than you would think. Right now It seems like its a little small on the figures you have. Try to push more of a cure to the center line to accentuate the action of the pose. I've found that it's helpful to have this first gesture lines be almost over stated because as you add the structure and flesh out the form, the pose tends to tighten up.
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greypace
Thanks! Yeah I realized they were too small. I will make sure to extend gesture line.
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Aline Fouard
I actually think you're doing quite alright with pelvis position, so just keep doing that! Here are a few thoughts about what's confusing when drawing the simplified pelvis. So, what you are supposed to do first is read the bony landmarks and that tells you about the pelvis position. It gets a bit tricky when drawing it simplified as a bucket or a box though because it is not the pelvis exact shapes and people interpretations can vary. Some will use the box and include the great trochanter (a landmark on the femur) in it. Some will make the bucket go below the genitals, as to include the ischial bones, but others will stop at the pubic symphysis since the ischiums are buried in muscles and never visible. Some will make the box or bucket go as high as the pelvis highest points (the iliac crests) while others cut it at the sacrum and iliac spine heights, and will add a bit more heights when adding the iliac crests. Don't panic, you don't need to know all these details right away! Using the simplified pelvis is much more important to develop a feel for its position. What I am trying to explain is that there is not one single approach to simplifying the pelvis and you just... have to feel your way in placing it by doing exactly what you're doing and doing it a lot. You coud also try drawing the pelvis as a box, which clarifies front and side plane more. Sorry about the lengthy answer, haha, pelvis are hard!
pelvis
prokofeedback2
prokofeeddback2
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greypace
Wow, never knew people use various methods. For the bucket I think I will use the iliac crests to the ichiums. The box with the sacrum landmark looks interesting. I'll try that. Thanks!
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greypace
Some of my recent studies. Please tell me anything that's wrong with these. What I know for sure is that I have no idea how to determine the position and angle of the pelvis. Don't really know how to draw limbs yet. Too many muscles.
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greypace
Can people actually draw anatomy that detailed from imagination? You gotta have a reference to do such an extensive task or idk how.
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greypace
Nice work! It's good that most of the poses aren't stiff. Make sure not to get stuck doing gesture. Learning basic anatomy also helps improve your gesture and shape design.
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greypace
5mo
Critique these please. I think these are my best drawings over the past half year. I should probably post my daily ones so fundamental mistakes would show more. I don't know much about anatomy so its very hit or miss. Should I do more gestural stuff? Construct using basic shapes? or am I ready to move onto more complex anatomy?
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greypace
​I find it really hard to draw portraits from a 3D model. Can you produce a very accurate drawing from 3D or is that a 2D reference thing? I have trouble with perceiving values and proportions when drawing from 3D.
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