Anubhav Saini
Anubhav Saini
Earth
Steve Lenze
Hey Anubhav Saini, I took the perspective you have for the room, and set the figure in that perspective. I'm not sure what you have the figure doing, so I just had him walk into the room. The biggest change I made is to show more of the floor, having the figure walk on the bottom of the panel doesn't look right. I hope this helps :)
dude
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much for your feedback it is really helpful
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Leandro Alli
Hey Anubhav! I'm not sure I understand what the pose is trying to achieve so I'm haveing difficulties drawing a manequinn to help you out. I belive one thing is causing you trouble is the fact that the left forearm is out of proportion, it's too long. So the character may have to be bending more in order to achieve the pose you want. I would recommend you draw the box of the torso first, try to draw a simplified manequinn on top to better understand his placement on the scene. If you need help achieving that, I recommend Proko's lesson on the Robo Bean: How to Draw Structure in the Body - Robo Bean Hopefully it's helpful, cheers!
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much
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Manuel
hello, @Anubhav Saini. I'm new here in the community, this is my first attempt to participate and help a fellow artist.   In order to help you more in detail, it might be good if you give an idea of ​​where you are pointing with the figure, what would be your idea of ​​the most finished drawing, such as if it is walking fast, or angry, or entering a place. etc.  As for the gesture I think it's quite clear, he's walking, something common when walking is that when the right foot is in front, the right arm is behind, I think it's something we do naturally to balance ourselves, I'm not sure. and regarding the shoulder area, what looks a bit strange are the lines that join the shirt with the sleeves (of the shirt), on the left arm the bottom line of the sleeve should be crossing the line that outlines the back, on the right arm the line that outlines the chest should be crossing the bottom line of the sleeve. (with your permission I could better illustrate this last point with a quick sketch on the drawing you shared) Also to help accentuate perspective, you could play around a bit by making the limbs that are positioned furthest from the camera a bit smaller than the ones in front. I hope the observations are useful to you. much encouragement with your drawing. cheers!
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Anubhav Saini
Welcome to the community and thank you for your feedback my idea was to make him look angry and i give you my permission to do a quick sketch on my drawing
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Marcus Moore
I would say reference is always your friend when it comes to the style, colors, etc. I know with anime shapes are generally simpler in design, from the faces, clothes, hair etc. The only time they generally put detail in is with muscle tone and the composition. I say all that to say, focus on simplifying the shapes for the hair and use reference from your favorite shows to obtain that style you want.
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much for your feedback
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Anubhav Saini
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Anubhav Saini
Hello please can anyone give their feedback on gesture and balance also i feel something is off on the shoulder area but i can't seem to figure out what *are there any perspective problems
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Anubhav Saini
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Anubhav Saini
hello everyone i would like to have feedback on color also i wanted to draw in tintin comic style as i am working on a comic where i want to draw in that style.
2nd Character
kemon
you want black hair to look like hair instead of just flat black shapes? The red areas should be white. You have the right idea of separating chuncks of black hair with a lighter outline but it should be white it just doesn't read well as red. Red is already a dark color. I get it red and black are cool but with a fully conceptualized character it could work but right now when you're studying anime hair, it doesn't look cool. Use white for highlights to help give it the feel of form and give you a chance to display hair texture. Oh and use big chunks of hair. Try to convey the chunks overlap to create a feeling of hair on someones head. It's easier said then done for someone just beginning their journey but until you get that part working id suggest not using small strands/chunks of hair. Study (copy) anime hair you'll see this done.
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much
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Anubhav Saini
Hello everyone please can anyone give their feedback on how to design anime hairs and lighting and form
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Liandro
Hey, @Anubhav Saini, thanks for reaching out again! Here’s what I get from the story: the guy gets sad because his friend thought his drawing was bad and mocked him, but instead of giving up, the guy practices, becomes successful and wins a prize, and that’s his way of overcoming the bullying and showing his friend that he’s better than they gave him credit for. Is that it? Well, @Mike Karcz and @Steve Lenze said it all, so I don’t feel I have much to add in terms of critique more so than that I agree with their comments. Mike has given you many precious pointers, and I’d especially highlight Steve’s awesome draw-overs on how to use perspective - really generous of them to take the time to provide such detailed feedbacks, so I’d encourage you to really take their notes into consideration while you keep studying to level up. And, considering you’ll focus on perspective, comics storytelling and hands as potential next steps in your journey, here’s some suggestions of resources I think you would benefit studying from: PERSPECTIVE . CtrlPaint’s perspective sketching series, part 1 (especially the sections where he talks about how to use a perspective grid) - https://ctrlpaint.myshopify.com/collections/foundation-skills/products/perspective-sketching-1-the-basics . Marshall Vandruff’s 1994 perspective series - https://marshallart.com/SHOP/all-products/all-videos/1994-perspective-drawing-series/ LANGUAGE OF COMICS . The two main books by Scott McCloud that Mike already suggested: “Understanding comics” and “Making comics”. They’ll be really, really helpful for you, since you say you want to be a comic book artist. There’s yet another book by the same author which I think is called “Reinveting comics” - it’s good too, but the other two are more fundamental and hands-on, so I’d prioritize them if possible. . Will Eisner’s books, “Comics and sequential art” and “Graphic storytelling and visual narrative”. In my opinion, they’re not as helpful or practical as McCloud’s, so, if I’d have to choose something to start with, I’d go with McCloud. But Eisner’s work is beautiful, and he’s kind of a pioneer in studying the language of comics, so I believe his books are a “must-read” for every comic book artist at some point. DRAWING HANDS There are many resources out there which can help you learn how to draw hands, but, in my experience, the most helpful lessons I ever took on this subject were Proko’s hands episodes, which are part of the anatomy course: How to Draw Hands – Muscle Anatomy of the Hand How to Draw HANDS – Details for Realistic Hands! How to Draw Hands from IMAGINATION – Step-by-Step How to Draw Female Hands Hands Holding Stuff N Things Drawing a Perfect Fist – HANDS in Action!!! How to Draw Foreshortened Hands How to Draw Cartoon Hands (Comic, Cartoon, and Mickey Mouse) (And there’s a bunch more, if you take the time to do a little search on the website). Hope this helps. Keep it up! Please keep posting your future creations for feedback. Best regards!
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much and yeah that was the story
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Steve Lenze
Okay, I agree with Mike, just doing two comic pages is an accomplishment, bravo. There are a lot of issues for you to work on in these comic pages, but don't get discouraged, it's just going to take practice. I gave you some notes and did some panel suggestions for you to look at, to kind of get the idea of what you could be thinking of. My biggest note is this: PERSPECTIVE IS YOUR FRIEND!! use it as much as you can to create dynamic panels. These suggestions are not everything by far, but should be enough for you to get started. As far as drawing issues like hands, that just takes practice and reference. Use reference for any drawing issue that you can't draw out of your head, including backgrounds. I hope these note are helpful to you :)
comic1
comic2
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much it is really helpful and i really really appreciate your notes and thank you for motivating me
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Mike Karcz
I think you're off to a good start. Keep studying/practicing your art fundamentals (Figure drawing, anatomy, perspective); you're on the right track. You've already made your first comic which is more than the majority of people have done. To be honest, I don't understand the story: A guy studies with someone, he hands in a picture, someone like a teacher mocks it, the teacher or the main character is sad, the character hypes himself up, he keeps working and then he succeeds and gives a speech while holding a stick of dynamite upside. I would not use cursive as the font for your dialogue; in some situations it could work (like to emphasize something), but in general it distracts the reader (I also can't read it). If you want to become a comic book artist - this is coming from someone who is not a comic book artist so use this advice how you see fit - grab a couple of your favorite comic books and reverse engineer them. Why do your favorite comic books work? What scenes are your favorite and why are they your favorite? What are they doing that you think they're doing well? Can you adopt those techniques? Is your story telling clear? Use what you've learned and make more comics. Study, make more, study, make more, etc. Some great resources that I think will help you as well would be the two books by Scott McCloud "Understanding The Invisible Art of Comics" and "Marking Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels"; and "Framed Ink" by Marcos Mateu-Mestre. If price is an issue, your local libraries may have copies of them, or you can put in a request at your local library to have them shipped over. *I was having a hard time with the floor tiles* - Need to study one point and two perspective. There are online courses and plethora of art books available. This will fix the issue you're having with the floor tiles. I think Drawabox.com has a section that covers it (free resource) *What areas should i focus more on to be a comic book artist* - What I've mentioned above ^ *Tips on drawing hands as i struggle with it a lot* - Hands are tough, but stick with it. Many anatomy courses will cover how to draw hands - Like proko's figure drawing. Otherwise many anatomy books like "Drawing the Head and Hands" by Andrew Loomis, or "Figure Drawing: Design and Invention" by Michael Hampton have sections covering the hands. The main idea - from what I understand - is breaking the hands down into simple shapes and building up from there. You can honestly get a lot of practice just from drawing your own hands - see how your palm forms sort of a boxy shape? Your fingers are cylinders? I sincerely hope this advice is helpful!
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much it is really helpful and i will follow your advice
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Anubhav Saini
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Anubhav Saini
Hello everyone this is my first try in comic art!!!!!!!! I aspire to be a comic book artist I have the following questions!!! *Please tell me what do you understand from the story *I was having a hard time with the floor tiles * What areas should i focus more on to be a comic book artist * Tips on drawing hands as i struggle with it a lot
Yo
Anubhav Saini
The goal with this drawing was to practice painting colors!!!!!!!
Skull paint study
Liandro
Cool, @Anubhav Saini! I think I like these ones even more than the others I commented on before. Great clarity on the gestures. And I gotta emphasize that the second one is definitely my favorite: good foreshortening and nice use of overlapping lines on the arm and leg! As an overall suggestion for gesture, I’d reinforce once again to experiment pushing the exaggeration some more. Please check out my comments and examples on the other posts, as the same logic applies to these. As for the drapery, one thing I’m noticing here that didn’t strike me as hard on the other ones is that the clothes might have gotten a bit too blocky. Since your intention was to practice the drapery, one thing I’d recommend for these ones is pretty much what @Steve Lenze had already mentioned in the others: to try noticing the fold patterns (especially on the softer fabrics) and think through how you can use them to inform the gesture and the forms of the figure underneath. I’m attaching my attempt on the fifth pose, which is the one where I find this aspect easiest to exemplify. Hope this helps! By the way, just one more thing! You made these three different posts with similar content and purpose - when this is the case, one thing I’d suggest for future posts, if possible, would be to combine your entire work in only one post! Since the three posts are all the same exercise and they were done somewhat around the same time, the most relevant comments often apply to all of them, so combining them in just one post makes it much easier for us to view and critique. And I know that the Proko website limits the attached images to a small number, but one thing you could do would be to use an app such as “Layout”, “Canva” or such to make a collage of the photos and sketches that belong to a same theme into one same image. In the case of these three recent posts you made, for example, it could be one post with just three images: one with the sketches and references of the old man, another one with the old woman and a third one with the young woman. Or maybe two collages for each group (a total of six images), if you find it would make the viewing better. Either way, something like this should already make the overall feel a bit more cohesive and organized. Ah, and perhaps, when needed, you might even like to crop the reference images to get rid of the unnecessary information such as date or the smartphone interface. This all takes just a bit of extra work, of course, but I think it’s worth it and should help enhance the presentation of your drawings. Okay, that’s it! :) Keep up your great practice and feel free to keep sharing with us whenever you’d like. Cheers!
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much i will follow your advice it is really helpful and for future post i will definitely make a collage
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Kristian Nee
Hey @Anubhav Saini, great job on these. I also looked at the other studies on your profile, you've been making huge improvement. Really cool to see. These are nice studies, you've really put a lot of character into them. I'm assuming that these are intentionally stylized, but something I might add is drawing through more. Right now these are really solid, but I think you could really pump up the energy a lot of you were to draw with more force. When I was at the Watts Atelier, @Erik Gist would always say to draw with so much energy that the lines might go onto your neighbor's drawing pad. He was joking, but the idea of it is still important. I've included some of his quick sketch to give you an idea. If you watch @Ryan Benjamin's video Super Techniques for Aspiring Comic Artists, you can see how he does an underdrawing with red pencil before going in for final pencils. This lets him be super loose without worrying about anything showing up. Again, great job on these and keep up the good work.
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much sirr from now i will draw with more force and these were not intentionally stylized
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Steve Lenze
Hey Anubhav, I will say that the gesture in drawing three is really nice. The first pose looks kind of straight, but there is a lot of gesture in that pose. I did a sketch to show you what I mean.
dress
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much
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Steve Lenze
Hey Anubhav, Good job sticking with practicing folds. I will start out saying these drawings have a lot of gesture, which is good. You also picked out the most important folds. Okay, so I did a couple of drawings to show you how I would design folds for these images. Remember to simplify the folds and use them to describe the anatomy underneath. They can also describe twists in the body, and areas where there is tension, like between the knees. Now, these sketches are using line to describe the folds, but you can also do so with rendering or paint. I hope this is helpful :)
folds
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Anubhav Saini
Thank you very much your feedback is really helpful
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