Alex Galeri
Alex Galeri
Italy
Love for comics, digital painting and drawing in general.
Alex Galeri
Hi! Here is my entry for this Prokochallenge! Malagasy folklore says that the lemur moves his tail to create a question mark when he is curious or interdicted: I found it really funny, so I've thought to scene strange enough to makes a lemur curious... a grasshopper that play the accordion can serve the purpose! 
21 09 proko challenge
21 09 proko challenge ref
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Alex Galeri
Great work! Love the atmosphere and the rhythm!
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Alex Galeri
Great Streaming! I had some fun doing this sketch, even if I'm not so skilled in creature design :)
funny dragon
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Alex Galeri
It's a drawing full of atmosphere... I love it! The only little thing that I can find is about the shadow of the hair on the left side of the face: I loke it, but at the same time I think that is maybe a little too dark, at least in the section near the nose. And I don't know if I like the black outline of the "window" so much, but here it's more a matter of taste. However it's "wow"
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Davi Lo
Oof thought I wasn't going to make it, so close Was a bit hesitant on going for a more gloomy tone but it's a theme that speaks to me a lot and hopefully I was able to properly communicate it! Hope you like it!
04.12(FINAL)
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Alex Galeri
simply great... Nothing more to say 😲
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Alex Galeri
Here's my entry for this Proko Challenge, with and without titles :)  I've always been a great fan of animation and fantasy, so this film talks about an epic quest, where a square head man looking for a legendary magic brush (because the magic wand has already been found)... but, that's enaugh: I will not say nothing more to avoid spoiler! I hope you can have some fun looking at it, at least a fraction of fun that I feeled while I've drawn this theme :)
21 06 prokochallenge full
21 06 prokochallenge
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Alex Galeri
It's wonderful! I literally love the colours of this piece! The only thing can be the shadow in the bottom-right corner: in my opinion maybe it's a little too dark and consequently the deltoid seems a little small... but can only be my tendency to always expect muscular characters when it comes to fantasy subjects :P Really congrat, however: as I already sad, wonderful painting,ù
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Alex Galeri
Good job and cool character! In my opinion cold light are quite tricky to use... In that case in particoular I think that shadows in are a bit to saturated and the light a bit to blue. I can suggest to look at some video of @Marco Bucci where he talks about colours and light: here's the link of one of them: https://youtu.be/gwLQ0cDb4cE Regarding blending, instead, I can suggest last video by @Sinix : https://youtu.be/9QEGEBK6nIY
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Alex Galeri
First of all, my congrat: in my opinion drawing comic is very complex and if you succed in handling with 40 pages without any experience, well: very good job, I'm impressed. For this page: when it comes to drawing action scenes, in my opinion perspective and shots are the most important things, because are the best weapon to convey speed and strenght. So, for the first scene, where you paint the fall, i would use a three point perspective as if the camera where just behind the captain, while he's looking the villain tha fall in the dark. Or, au contraire, you can put the camera behind the villain, while he is looking toward the captain at the top of the cliff. Issue number 2: you have to connect this vignette (Vignette 1) to the one in the top right corner (Vignette 2). To do that, I appreciate your approach (erase the contourn line of the vignette) but I would go even further: why don't make the close-up of the captain bigger and fuse it with the left side of the page? You can do it with simple blur or in many other way, maybe using the shadw of the Vignette 2 as a "transparency layer" that let you see Vignette 1 (I hope I have express this idea clearly: P). As reference, for fantasy battle scenes, there are a lot of different comics: I suggest you Senzanima or Dragonero (Sergio Bonelli), Berserk (by Kentaro Miura), and Bone (Jeff Smith: more cartoony, but one of the greatest milestone of fantasy comics). But there's a plenty of good stuff: all depends by your flavors. Hope it can be useful! PS: I hope I can read your comic one day ;)
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Peter Anton
You have the silhouettes of the textures, which is one component- the other is the breakup pattern as we move from shadow to light. All your transitions are smooth, which makes all your textures look the same. Think about the moon: not a ton of textural information in the lights or shadows, but a lot of information as we transition from light to shadow. Jon Hardesty does a good job explaining textures- he has a whole series on Schoolism and maybe on Youtube as well. DND artists to study would be Jesper Esjing and Tyler Jacobson. Put their art next to yours and spend some time really thinking about what separates their art from yours
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Alex Galeri
Thank you so much! These are great advices: I surely going to follow them!
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Luigi Manese
Just to add on top of some 'homework' that everyone else has discussed xD, I think Dorian Iten is one of the best when it comes to breaking down light on form. He has some free material on YouTube, some fairly cheap resources on Gumroad, and if you're up for it, you can drop some money on some of his full courses on his website. Coincidentally, he happened to have dropped a lot of courses via Proko today, so that might be worth checking out! At the end of the day, understanding proper light on form is how we make things realistic. Different materials will react differently based on different lighting scenarios, so understanding light on form is definitely the foundation you want to tackle. As far as style goes, fantasy happens to have a wide range. Wizards of the Coast is one of the biggest names, and obviously their official art leans toward the painterly/cinematic/realistic style. HOWEVER, Critical Role has a huge following, and their art tends to lean towards something more graphic and cartoony. Critical Role's 'cartoon' style however seems more anime inspired than the work you have shown here. Not saying you have to lean towards that style though, as your fundamentals get better and better, your natural style could be the defining feature of fantasy work in the future. No one can really say what's right so it's best to focus on what you enjoy. Hope this helps, and hope to see more of your work! Fantasy happens to be my favorite genre to work in as well
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Alex Galeri
Thank you so much! Thi is very helpful! I certainly take a look!
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teteo tolis
Hello Alex, Okay let's take that off the way first... Ahem.... THE STYLE COMES NATURALLY, you don't need to "search" for it. Your "style" is an outcome of your knowledge, skill and the things you love. The main issue here is the way you try to shade and render your illustrations. You rely too much on effects and I can tell that because everything is rendered following the same method. For example, on the lady with the pink pants, Her whole outfit and body have the same shiny feeling and effects, like she's made from plastic. And the light source is all over the place. I can tell by looking at it , that you used a "multiply layer" and a "color dodge layer" on top. Layer modes work great, but relying on them too much, is a bad idea. Make the layer modes to work FOR you, not the other way around. How? -Do some research on "Color theory" Learn how colors and different materials behave with light ( reflective or not ). -And how a "light source" works. WHAT TO STUDY ? Here, Marco Bucci is AMAZING with color, shading and rendering, and you can learn a lot! https://www.proko.com/lesson/painting-skin-tones-and-how-light-affects-color-marco-bucci/discussions
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Alex Galeri
Thank so much for your suggestions: I definitly going for follow them 👍 And surely I'll take a look to the video you have linked as well 🧐
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Nanna Skytte
Asked for help
I did this color study today (1,5 hour) My goal is to push myself to work fast while also learning something about colors, structure light and shape design. I think the skin and the hand was hard to do, under such short amount of time. Link to reference photo: https://unsplash.com/photos/BthSqlD2Cso
Screenshot 2021 05 23 at 12.55.43
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Alex Galeri
It's a good job in my opinion, over all considering the amount of time you have put in it! For the skin maybe the shadow can be renforced just a little in the inferior side of the face. In my opinion, you can even make the shadow a little (but only a very little) reddish and less saturated on the skin. The hand under the face it's quite an issue mainly becouse it isn't so "expressive" neither in the photo reference: maybe you can enhance tridimensionality suggesting the attachment of the anular and adding a little light at the end of the fingers. But, I repeat: well done :)
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Alex Galeri
I't's wonderful in my opinion! I'm not experienced enough in portrait drawing to give you any technical advice (seeing your level)... I only would be curious to see the same drawing with a darker background on the right side: even if it probably could appear a bit unrealistic, I think it can be useful to "pop up" the portrait even more
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Peter Anton
Your drawing skills seem pretty decent. The main area I see needing work is lighting from imagination. You seem to do it a good job copying the shadow shapes from the models, but when you shade in your original work, you are shading the micro shapes of the muscles but not the overall shape of the arm (a cylinder). So maybe drawing white cylinders under various lighting scenarios would help. The other critique I have is about the body of work as a whole: I can't tell what you want to do. Figurative fine art? Illustration? Concept art? Caricature? It's fine if this is a hobby, but if you're aiming to go pro in the future, I think you need to get a clearer idea of what you want to get hired for, and tailor your portfolio to that.
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Alex Galeri
Thanks for the feeback, I surely keep that in mind and I'll try to keep improving my technique :) (You're defenetly right with protfolio issue)
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Rubén Frutos
Hey Alex! I love the different charcters and the variaton of designs!! Very well done! Also you have some cool poses and a fair understanding of anatomy -Althought this is something that has to be constantly studied and improved. As for the style, I don't think there's anything wrong with it. If you like pushing proportions, face features and using saturated colors it's totally fine. As you pointed out, I think your biggest issue is in the material rendering. All of the items within your designs (or most of them) seem to have the same specularity, which is the capability of an object to reflect light. This, when different materials are placed under the same light, translates on different value ranges for each of the materials. For instance, the value range of a piece of woof will be much smaller than the value range of skin, when they are both under the same light. This being said, I'd recommend you that you do studies on different materials. Mostly on different fabrics, armor and skin if you want to apply them to your characters. I'd also recommend you to watch Marco Bucci's mini series on character design where he approaches this issue -among many others-. And if you didn't know Marco's channel he has plenty of usefull videos, some about lighting and the different types of shadows that you have to face when painting. Pretty useful. I hope this was helpful!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nx2Q3ypuTVk
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Alex Galeri
 Thanks very much, this is helpful 😀 I know Marco Bucci's channel, but I've never seen these video in particular! I'm surely going to have a look
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Alec Brubaker
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Alex Galeri
Thank you so much 😁
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Jan D.
Hi! My name is Jan (pronounced yan;) Originally from Poland but Living in Ireland now. Excited bout Proko2.0! Trying to do art/Illustration for a living somehow:D Some of my stuffs:
jan drawc final smaller
jan drawc forest skeleton
red gate small
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Alex Galeri
Impressive! Rendering style is wonderful and the atmosphere is really cool!
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Serena Marenco
Hi, I'm Serena (it would be Serena Marina but my name is a bit cacophonous, so just Serena is OK) from Italy. I studied art in high school but then I had to abandon my studies to start working. Until the early 2000s I was part of an art collective where, under pressure from some of my former teachers I exhibited as an abstractionist (you know how it is, "That's what the market wants, that's what gallery owners want!") until I ran away screaming because, honestly? The exhibition, art competition and gallery circuit, at least in my country, is more of an ego playground than an environment that invites creativity. I worked for several years as an editorial graphic designer and in the field of comics, as a colourist and letterer (oh, I forgot, and as a sports photographer! How to earn a few euros freezing on the edge of a football field!), until I decided to pick up the pencil (well, the digital pen actually) and relearn to draw and paint, even going to fill some gaps that I had left at school (no anatomy course, no portraits except copies of plaster busts and the courses of life drawing and sculpture replaced by chemistry and algebra in the final two years because the ministerial program said so!). I envy today's children so much who have all these tools at their disposal that when I was a student they were not even dreams! Anyway, when I was a kid I wanted to be a nature illustrator (like the National Geographic people!), now I draw animals as a warm-up before I start working. 
Bushbaby
24 03 20202 copia
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Alex Galeri
Complimenti! Gran bei disegni :O non mi stupirei di vederli in libri illustrati o riviste specializzate: continua così :)
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James Doane
Hey everyone! I am James, and I have done some form of art all my life. I have worked with graphite, charcoal, colored pencil, pastel, oil, acrylic, digital,... My recent focus has been on digital paintings of portraits and figures. Attached are some of my digital works done in Photoshop. I also have a PhD in engineering biomechanics, so I have a strong background in anatomy and human movement. I try to use that in my art.
Painting 16
Painting 5
Painting 2
Ayame069 painting
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Alex Galeri
Simply wonderful!
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