Drawing Fundamentals: Accuracy, Values, & Light

Course by Dorian Iten
Dorian Iten
My three guides will help you see and think with the fundamentals of copying accurately, applying correct values, and creating light.
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Harim Kim
why is the bundle 5$ more expensive than the price in Dorian's private website? why should I use proko 2.0 platform? is it for the community? Im not upset, im just curious why.
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philipjp
Dorian, Thanks, this lesson was great. I tended to get bogged down in those little details you spoke of in the focus section. I know artists, speaking for myself, get lost in the "how" in the "process of making art" often and not the "why" of the "process of making art," which hinders actual artistic growth. Things like "this is what an arm should look like at this angle" or getting the right head tilts can be overwhelming. And that approach is entirely frustrating. With that big picture focus concept with measure, angles, etc., I'm learning to slow down, get the whole picture and make more educated deliberate marks in what I create. I don't think I grasped how/what work big then work your way down meant (I hope that made sense) until this course. Cheers,  Again, thanks for the great course.
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Dick Hill
Dorian - I just watched the accuracy section of your drawing guide, great stuff, thank you! Quick question: When drawing from life, it's often the case that my drawing will not be "sight size" on my drawing surface. How can I accurately measure my subject and then transfer that measurement accurately to my drawing? Is it a case of simply deciding to place a hash mark where I think the top of head should be on my paper, and a hash where I think the bottom of the foot should be, and make that my vertical "master measurement" that all other measurements are compared to? It seems like that leaves all other measurements open to guestimation and inaccuracy as you translate measurements from the subject up or down in size to match your first measurement proportionately on the drawing. Is there a better way? Ratio glasses perhaps? ; )
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Matthew Medeiros
Just started portraits about a month and a half ago. Trying to make my heads look more 3d without being cartoonish. Trying to figure out shadow mapping too. What do I need to work on?
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Peter Abraham
Hi Matthew, I might suggest not worrying too much about rendering the image at this stage, I fell into the trap of wanting each picture to be 'finished'. I then switched my focus and I got a lot of satisfaction from my time spent more on overall accuracy of the head proportions, placement of features and how they align with one another. Have a look at Dorian Iten's course where he talks about alignment and measuring (the principles he uses for figure drawing are all relevant for portraiture too) Try and do lots of heads with just the basic block in of the head and features, its hard but try not to go into detail, you just want to practice the overall placement and identifying the landmarks. If you to want to add some shading when you're happy with the above, I'd suggest just identifying the darkest shadow value to start - initially just stick with one value, you'd be surprised on the effect it can have. Take small steps and enjoy the journey Hope this helps Pete
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Lane
6mo
Hey Matthew! Just some notes on face proportions and measuring. Her cranium seems too small and her mouth isn't lined up with her lips. For a relaxed mouth, it should be the right under it at the same angle (follow the cupid's bow). Also, the mouth is a tad small. If you draw a line from the pupil, the corners of the lips should meet it (in a "standard" face. It's the case in your reference). In terms of values, the main shadow shapes are on the left side of the frame, and they're soft. You might want to work with references with clearer shadow shapes. I like practicing with 2, 3 values to really commit to the shadow shapes (which reads more 3d). You could experiment drawing just shapes instead of lines. It's useful to map the planes of the face, too. That's what I work on to try to get a more 3d feel. I hope this helps. :) Just getting started with the course and looking forward to learning more.
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Bert Haelvoet
Hello, Matthew. I am also a student so take what you want from my view. It's a difficult pose. A huge tilt and little contrast in her face. You did well for her tilt but I think you need some more tilt, and raise her shoulder on the left side. The left cheek is to big. You need also to drop her ear,and draw it a little more towards her chin.. that's gonna help a lot. For the light/ shadow part you have to push more shadows on the shadow side, on the leftand under her chin/ neck. That way you can push a little bit more halftones on the right. That's what I see and mabee it''s not what you were asking.. Take carehapoy drawings
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