Part 1 - Light on a Basic Sphere and Intro to Compression

967

Part 1 - Light on a Basic Sphere and Intro to Compression

967
Steven Zapata
Join me for a review of the basics as we take a look at how directional light affects a sphere.
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Pharan Pharan
Great introduction! As long as we're disambiguating terms, I thought it was a step in the wrong direction to label "terminator" and "core shadow" as the same thing. The shadow terminator is where the surface "stops facing the light" (starting at 90 degrees). Everything beyond it is equally blocked and doesn't receive direct light. The effect is only that it's darker than the lit side. The terminator is relative to one light source. The core shadow is where the surface is receiving the least amount of both direct and bounce light. The effect is that some part of the shadow side is darker than others. But the core shadow moves if the bounce light moves, even if the primary light doesn't (and its shadow terminator doesn't). The core shadow is relative to the reflected light. Another way to think about it is that the core shadow is the shading effect of both the primary and bounce lights. As variation of the example in the video, if the table were diagonal, the bounce light would be stronger where the ball surface points towards the table. The core shadow would be on the side farther from the bounce light source. The source of the bounce light doesn't need to be so close for this to have an effect.
Screenshot 2021 09 09 001534
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Nad Sem
Physics meets art class. I absolutely loved this. LOL. I was surprised by the detailed technical explanation. I even had to look up some words in the old dicionary. English is not my first language and I know zero about physics. But I THINK I got it... I made a screenshot of the final presentation to keep as a reference.
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Jean-Francois (Jeff) Durix
great introduction. My physicist education though was hurt by the mention of exponential fall off. If the light source is lambertian, the intensity distribution follows cosine, not an exponential. Not critical for drawing and the principals remain correct ;-)
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Steven Zapata
Hah, thank you for the correction. I am definitely a drawing person first and foremost.
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Kaiya Alisha Everitt
When I was watching the video I was thinking someone with scientific knowledge is going to start having heart palpitations watching this haha
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