Structure your learning
2mo
Christopher Lebreault
Hey community! I've been having difficulty with structuring my own art education. I ask the question "I never know when I'm done" or "I never know when to move on" and I'm always met with "never, you will always do these things." So I will use college to expamplify what I mean by I have difficulty structuring my art education. In college you have a Major, a program, a semester, and your classes. These would be Art, curriculum, fall 2021, drawing 101 (respectively) I know my "major". It's art(DUH), but I'm hoping to work in animation. Idk what my "curriculum" would be or how long my "semesters" should be, and my class feel more like electives because I have no direction to follow. (even if I'm on the right track) My question to you all here is, how are you handling/managing your art education? Any suggestions or resources, etc? THX!
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Hank Macleod
I found Radiorunner's Curriculum for the Solo Artist very helpful! Limiting each unit to a month and trying to complete each challenge within that time frame it gives you that start and end point as well as practice meeting deadlines. You can follow it strictly or use it as a resource for cobbling together your own curriculum. Here's the link: https://imgur.com/gallery/RXJ2nmH Hope this helps!
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Steve Lenze
Work in animation doing what? Animator- anatomy, acting, gesture study, Life drawing using only line to show 3D, timing, perspective Backgrounds- perspective, cinematography, composition, mood Character design- anatomy, life drawing, perspective, gesture, costume, nature studies, animals, insects, native cultures Storyboard- all of the above Figure out what you want to do, then list what you need to study.
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Kristian Nee
Hey Christopher! The first thing I would do if I were you would be to find a community to draw with. Whether it's online or in person, that's up to you but I think it's essential to art growth to be in a community of people you enjoy being around. Building your own curriculum from scratch is almost impossible, and not really necessary. There are so many people out there that do weekly sketch groups, host art discords, or figure drawing workshops. If you're determined, you shouldn't have too much trouble building a community. The benefit of a community is that it will do two things. It will keep you accountable in the way an art school would (for much cheaper) and it will make it fun to do. The boring parts of learning art become fun because you're studying with your friends vs completely on your own. The more you can create your own art community, I think that a study curriculum will fall into place. Hope this helps!
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Christopher Lebreault
This helps a lot! I coincidentally just moved to a new city and was planning on using "Meetup" to get know the city and do some art meetups (will be first time). Something like Proko definitely will help with that as well, but I forgot to log on often (cannot wait for an app!)
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Beth
2mo
start writing tasks down and see if there is a pattern especially when it comes to managing your time. Get a calendar where you can see ahead of time what you need to complete. Everyone studies differently so try to see what your pattern is or if you can change or move things around. ok I focused on shading for about an hour and then read and researched bone structure of the hand and so on. Your deadlines and what they are. Lets say prepare for an art show in 2 months. so it helps you to prepare for that in advance for example. Writing things down does help. Hope that helps a little bit.
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