Bird Painting
4mo
Jason Arizona
I drew a small painting of a bird. I'm not too keen on how it turned out. When i first concieved of the painting, I had a general, rough idea of how it would look, as far as composition and color. I decided to alter the composition, because it felt like more of a "professional" thing to do, and ended up with something I'm proud of, but not quite happy with. My question is, is it actually good this way? Should I redraw it from the top? What should I practice based on the flaws in this painting?
zen kvil
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Gabriel Kahn
Hey there! Very cute work, I like it :) First of all, it was very hard for me to understand whats going on in the image at first, this is mostly because of the composition. The others have already talked about it so I'll try to tell you about different aspects. You put a white character in front of a similar, very light color which makes it very hard to read. You can either make the bird a bit darker (or give it a stronger outline) or make the background darker, that way the character can pop. Other than that I like the design aspects, but maybe try to use a bit more symmetry so different shapes can compliment eachother. Hopefully, I could help! Keep up the great work! :)
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Jon Neimeister
There's a lot of good things going on with the piece! The colors and style are all very charming. Compositionally, I think it suffers a bit from having the bird relegated perfectly to one corner of the image, basically dividing the image into even 1/4ths emphasized by the beam of light. A great rule of thumb for composition is the "Three Bears" rule: Papa Bear, Mama Bear, and Baby Bear. Where one element of the piece is the largest, another element in the middle, and a third is the smallest. You always want to look for ways to divide the space in the image this way, as the contrast is more visually interesting than even divisions. You could solve this by moving the bird around a bit, or by experimenting with cropping / expanding the canvas. Ultimately with composition your main goal is dividing the space in interesting ways, and creating the areas of high density shapes interacting with each other contrasted against larger areas of simpler shapes to let the eye rest. This balance creates interest and emphasizes your focal point. It's kinda hard to explain but here's an example using the image you shared below:
3Bears
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Jason Arizona
Originally, the bird was going to be dead center, but I had recently seen a video about doing value/composition studies before I had started on the piece. I knew I wanted the bird to be round, and in front of a rhombus, so I experimented with arranging rhombuses and circles on pages. The top left is the way it originally sort of "appeared" in my head, and the bottom right is the composition "base" I eventually went with. I think this is one of the main reasons I was unhappy with the painting. I've heard of something like the "three bears" rule in Marco Bucci's video on travel sketching, but instead he explained it as using big, medium, and small shapes. (https://youtu.be/T06k-vBVY8o?t=314) Is that the same thing, or just related?
zen kvil compositions
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Dan B
Nice whimsical style! The bits I’m not sure about are the white lines and the crown. Do they have a purpose? I.e. if the crown is portraying royalty, what story goes with it? I would either remove it, or add something to the background that adds context. I’m also not sure about the pose, the character seems to be jumping for joy (crown off its head) but the eyes suggest a calm peace. I suppose what I’m getting at is think about what idea the composition expresses is and whether that comes across clearly.
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Jason Arizona
Well, the bird's supposed to be hovering, along with the crown. The lines are sort of "just because it looks cool." I didn't want to communicate a *story* with this piece, but rather a mood, like Gould's Hill by Neil Welliver (attached).
gould's hill neil welliver
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Yiming Wu
This is looking great in general. If I must have an advice, it might be the back of the bird being too light in value and it doesn't show the bird's silhouette that well. You can try tune that down just a little bit without changing the composition for it to be more readable. Sometimes it's tricky, because thinking about composition you got to think about all the graphical property of those things.
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Steve Lenze
Hey Jason, one compositional thing that you could do to help this painting is to put your white bird in front of a dark background so that we can see it. If your bird was a dark color, you would do the opposite.
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