pollypopcorn
pollypopcorn
Utah
pollypopcorn
Good job with your goal! It's not easy to keep up consistent work every day.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
It looks like you could maybe use a little more space between the eyes. I don't know much about making video games, but I imagine that you have would be good because it's actually more difficult to animate a character and make them move if they have too many details. It's probably better to have a few details and elements and make those elements strong.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
I would commit more to single lines rather than making them scratchy, even though they won't be perfect now.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
I would do several drawings with perspective lines so you can understand the concept and then draw a whole ton from life so you can get a good intuition of how long sides become at different angles and so on.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
One thing to do to prevent a hairy, scratchy look with hatching is to follow the forms like I see you've done with some of yours. Something about the silhouette of the front of her face feels wrong to me. I think part of it might be that the far side of the cheek is so light that it's blending in with the background so it makes it look off. The hair looks really nice.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
It looks really good. One thing to keep in mind is the thatch roof would likely be thicker and we'd be seeing the side of it from this angle. Especially the front half of the roof looks fairly flat.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Along the lines of the scene you're painting changing over time, would you recommend painting the sky first? Last? Do you need to do it really fast? Because the sky is often the quickest thing to change. There are many paintings and pictures of landscapes and skies and sunsets. How does a landscape painting get set apart as a good painting and good composition, rather than seeming unoriginal or just another landscape?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Looks great
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
I've found from experience that you learn from tracing, but you learn less than you do from copying. I think what you do should be based on whether your goal is to take in a lot of poses/figures fast, or if you want to do a more difficult, longer, and more educational study. Sometimes after I trace things I find that I'm not able to draw something similar (but slightly different) myself as much as I thought I could. Both are good, tracing can help with breadth and copying can help with depth.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Even though there are some ways to learn more efficiently and faster, what's most important is that you're doing any drawing. Any step forward is a step forward. There can be good things to focus on first, but it's more important that you're doing whatever you can if worrying about doing the best thing prevents you from doing anything. I would also recommend trying to draw from imagination or like however you want to be drawing because that will help you to see where your weaknesses are and what you should focus learning on and why. You can't fix mistakes you don't make. You can't improve until you mess up.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
I would make some of your half tones darker. Try to not leave so much of the face pure white or near pure white.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
One thing to consider (not exactly perspective) is the height of the sidewalk at the edge of the road. Also remember as other people have said that in one point perspective lines that aren't going towards the horizon are vertical or horizontal (with a cube).
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
It's looking pretty good. Try to remember that the reflected light is usually darker than the halftones.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Granny Piner
Hello, as I see many people have given many detail feedbacks, I will not do the same thing . However, I would like to suggest how you can improve in the future. For me, the best way to be good at drawingb] anything in general is to understand the subject of your drawing. I would suggest that you study the 3D head model such as the loomis head ( there are videos on that on Proko YouTube channel) or the Asaro head.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Thank you. I drew the picture based on my best present understanding of the head, but I'll continue learning and I'm sure it will get better and better.
Reply
pollypopcorn
I think they look good. Especially the one with a solider in a doorway. You can tell immediately where the focus of the picture is.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
One rule of thumb Stan often mentions is that the lightest dark is darker than the darkest light. So I would be careful to not make your half tones near the highlight too dark. Here is a video on Proko on shading that I think you'd find really helpful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vapw6n6FyU&t=123s
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Sketcher Ameya
It is looking good but Think you should work on shading and drawing hair. Try to give some highlights to it .
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Thank you, I was feeling uncertain on how to add highlights.
Reply
Vincentius Sesarius
Making artwork out of imagination is a great and fun activity and challenge to make you a better artist. But the thing about drawing from imagination, especially if you're just starting out, is that there's a lot of inconsistencies that you may unconsciously make. So what I will advice you to do in future is 1) imagine the scenario (a portrait with light coming from the left upper side), 2) then you look for a reference image which match the scenario you just made. Voila, you got yourself a hybrid! And for this particular artwork, I just did a sketch over it (if that's okay) to point out the things you may want to integrate to your own. I see that you're trying a Rembrandt kind of lighting situation and it's one of my favorites! The key to Rembrandt lighting is that you need to be bold with your lines separating the light and the shadow (like the triangle on her left (our right) cheeks). It creates a great contrast, and that's what a Rembrandt lighting is all about.
proko comment 001
proko comment 001 clear
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Thanks for all your advice. I think drawing from imagination is good as an exercise and because it can help you see what you don't understand yet. It's probably best to draw some from imagination, some from reference, and a lot of in between.
Reply
Zoungy Kligge
I just did this quick draw over with some ideas. Hope it helps. I mainly changed the eye size, tried to make the lighting consistent, and give shape to the hair, while trying to keep the face 'the same person' as yours
draw over
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Thank you for taking the time to do that. It is helpful to see your changes, especially with the hair.
Reply
Sylvain St-Pierre
hi Pollypop, i think its really difficult to do that from imagination even for experienced artists. I know little about it but i would suggest eyes a tiny bit smaller. From side to side (without ears) the width of the eyes should enter 5 times. Also add darker shadows and midtones but as is said i am no pro so check other suggestions.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
pollypopcorn
Thank you. I didn't notice that the eyes were too big before you said that.
Reply