Christopher Beaven
Christopher Beaven
Washington
After 3251 days straight (9 years) of consistent creation I identify as an unstoppable daily creator. Now I want to show others how to do the same.
Jesper Axelsson
Hi, here is my fourth Tarzan drawing. It took 5 h and 15 min. Conté (b & 2b) on A2 printer paper. My main focus was to have an interesting shape and value composition. I wanted the shapes to interlock more, like a puzzle and I wanted the shapes to feel less clumsy. I'm very happy with it :) Feedback appreciated! The composition I had in mind when I started was a triangular shape splitting the canvas in two, with cool active shape design and a lot of energy. I think my brain was bringing up a Frazetta drawing. But the drawing didn't end up that way, because I had trouble coming up with something in that composition where the story was clear. The drawing I did illustrates Tarzan, proclaiming his victory over the lioness he's just defeated. He's yelling and pounding his chest. He has his right foot on the killed lioness. It's a full moon and the jungle lies dark. I think the fight took place out on a clearing in the jungle. The dark shape in the background is supposed to be the tree-top skyline. What do you think of the composition? The shape design? The value design? Do you think the story reads? Thanks in advance :)
Tarzan 4
Tarzan 4 1h 1
Tarzan 4 1h 2
Tarzan 4 2h 1
Tarzan 4 2h 2
Tarzan 4 2h 3
Tarzan 4 2h 4
Tarzan 4 2h 5
Tarzan 4 3h
Tarzan 4 4h
Tarzan 4
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Christopher Beaven
I like the composition but I wonder if I hadn't read what you wrote of the story if I would have known what was going on. When I look at the composition I'm not sure anyone could tell what is happening or has happened. You may want to show it to people that have not seen it before and ask them what the narrative is to test. I love your exercise and the compositions but the materials do not lend themselves well to a finished concept. Smoother paper would help a bunch I think. But I know you're challenging yourself to complete it faster which is great. Consistency beats good all the time. Keep it up!
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Marco Sordi
Hi everybody. I hope you don't mind if I post this work here since there is no specific section for this kind of illustrations. This is a work I realized some months ago for an illustration contest. The contest theme was "Summer". The results have not yet been disclosed. I hope for the best. Thanks.
Summer
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Christopher Beaven
Wonderful painting! I love the light and colors throughout. The composition draws me into the center as well. I've been looking at your work for a while now and I feel that your next big step is with texture. The figures and their clothing has very similar texture, same with the sand. Maybe try not smoothing out everything so much keep it a bit painterly? Hope that helps! Keep up posting all the time like you do, you're rocking it!
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Christopher Beaven
Both of these oil paintings were done from a digital landscape I created. On the left is a painting done from scratch. On the right is the same painting but painted on top of a digital print. Which one do you think is best?
painting compare
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Marco Sordi
Hello everybody. This is my latest concept for a video game character with related 2D animation video. There are a lot of mistakes. I'm still a rookie (in both illustration and 2D animation) but I hope u will enjoy it. From tomorrow I'll start to make the video of Maria who moves arms and torso. For the video scan the QR code below or click on this link to my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBmkh036LCc Thanks for any comment or advice. Good night!
Maria Kitajima concept
Maria Kitajima concept easy
Maria Kitajima model front view
Maria Kitagawa Facial expressions youtube
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Christopher Beaven
Great job Marco! Everyone starts somewhere. I think it's wonderful. I have no idea what it would take to do that but I'm sure it took a lot of time and effort.
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Christopher Beaven
Hey! Great painting! Could you like the original you studied from? I'd like to see the comparative.
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Steve Lenze
@Christopher Beaven nailed it. I always look at the feet, and which way the clothing or whatever is turning either down or up. Usually photographers will stand when they shoot the model, so the horizon line is usually at around chest or shoulder level. I did a little diagram that might make it easier :)
perspectivebody
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Christopher Beaven
Awesome! Love this Steve! You're feedback is always top notch :)
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Christopher Beaven
What a great question! I always have trouble with this. I don't like guessing so let's figure out a logical method to at least get us close. 1. What is obviously above the horizon line and below the horizon line? 1a. The feet are obviously below but I don't see anything obviously above. If the head was way above I would see the underside of the chin when the head is level. 2. Can we get a bit closer with some other kinda obvious points? 2a. The boxer shorts on the guy have a line that is curving downward in the center. That tells me that the horizon line is above that point. A bit closer.... The problem is that I can see things that indicate they are below the horizon line but I can't find anything that clearly indicates it's above the horizon line. I know it's above the ASIS... If I have to guess from here I would say that the horizon line is above the navel and right around the chest region for both models. I wonder, if perspective is this close to being neutral if it even matters. Just draw the figures as if the horizon line is going right through the center. I'm not sure if my rambling helped but there it is. Thanks for the question!
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bfizz23
Can anybody offer general tips on how to determine which part of the bean should be in front? I've also attached specific examples I had trouble with: 1.) It looks like she's sticking out her hips toward us, but Stan drew the top part in front. 2.) She looks level and not tilting forward or backward, but Stan drew the bottom part in front. 3.) Same as #2, she looks kind of level, but Stan drew the bottom part in front.
3
4
6
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Christopher Beaven
For the first one look at the tilt of the shoulder and breasts. It indicates a tilt toward the viewer. I would agree with you on the second one. She is standing straight. I agree again for the third. Here is, in my opinion, the important part. Gesture and something further deconstructed like the bean is completely up to the artists interpretation. Further on in the lessons he has you exaggerate the pose. Yes, understanding the body as a big shape and what it's doing is important but it doesn't really matter if you choose the top or the bottom forward on some the images that are hard to read. The most important part is that you do all the exercises and practice as much as you can. Consistency beats perfect 100% of the time.
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Christopher Beaven
I'm going to echo everything everyone has said already. Wonderful painting, love the color variation in the white of the dress. The biggest room for improvement is the rocks. I know it's in the background but to me they are quite distracting because they don't look very organic. There is too much even rhythm in them making them look man made. Everything else is fantastic. What are you planning on doing with this painting? Selling?
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Christopher Beaven
I like the illustration but I'm not very familiar with the subject exactly. Do you have any examples of illustrations for beauty magazines? Maybe you have some examples of illustrators you admire?
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Jesper Axelsson
Hi, I just finished my third Tarzan drawing. It took 4h and 35 min and was done with conté (B) on A2 printer paper. I'm really happy with it! I aimed at working as simple as possible; large shapes and thinking of the figures as simple mannequins. It really helped! I spent more time in the thumbnailing stage, so that I had a clear 3 value plan before starting on the real drawing. Things that I would like to change are: - The position of the hand, I think it's unanatomical at the moment. - Clarify Tarzan's pose; I think I lost track of the back's centerline and I also suspect that the pose is a bit broken. - Redesign the leaf pattern on his arm. - Even out tones and bring clarity around certain edges. But as far as the big picture goes I don't think I would change much. What do you think? How do you think the read is? Can you tell what's going on? What do you think of the tonal composition? Before diving in to this piece I tried to define more precisely what the exercise is about, and I ended up with this: The exercise is to take a drawing from idea to final product in 4 hours, using the skills I have. The drawings should have a full value range and preferably edge variation. Using reference is encouraged. Cheers!
Tarzan 3 1h
Tarzan 3 2h
Tarzan 3 2h 2
Tarzan 3 2h 3
Tarzan 3 2h 4
Tarzan 3 3h 1
Tarzan 3 3h 2
Tarzan 3
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Christopher Beaven
I think the composition is very exciting and active. The rays of light passing behind Tarzan and directly at the point of interest is great. The biggest room for improvement I see all anatomical. The anatomy needs some work but at such a rushed drawing for you that is understandable. When you say you want to redesign the leaf pattern on his arm I think you may be setting yourself up for failure there unless you increase the size of the drawing or use something with finer detail. Overall I think this composition is a huge improvement from your last! Have you ever tried the Creative Composition course on svslearn.com? I've taken it and it's the most comprehensive course on composition I've ever seen. Keep going with this. The more you do this and keep your constant feedback look the faster you will improve. Great job!
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Christopher Beaven
Wonderful job on the drawing. I also like the animated gif showing the differences. I don't think it's super important that your drawing is off a little bit. It doesn't have to be 100% accurate. What I think is most important, and you captured well, is the subtle values throughout the whole cast. Especially the reflected light. And even more important is your understanding of form. You've shaded the form in such a way that I can tell you understand how it moves through space. The depth is wonderful! All good stuff to say here. Move on to the next and Keep going!
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Bradley Forbush
I did the assignment quick enough, but delayed in posting them.
eggsperiments a
eggsperiments b
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Christopher Beaven
Love these! If I ever paint some eggs I want to make compositions similar. Very interesting.
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Christopher Beaven
I agree with Steve's comment. I would also add that it looks as though your thinking of body parts, objects, things when you do your gestures. Think of movement and the center line of each forms instead. I've found that I draw better gestures when I do the same. Lastly, how long are you spending on each of these?
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Christopher Beaven
I love this exercise! Giving yourself a time limit really gets you out of our comfort zone a little and will really help expand your skills. I like the concept of the finished drawing. You have a lot of good contrast as well. The forms are a little hard to discern because of the paper texture and contrast that is just too dark. I'll point out some specifics. The way his right leg and right arm lines up makes the form confusing and I'm wondering if someone can actually get there leg in that position. The separation of the muscles in the right forearm with high contrast is also separating the lower arm from the upper arm. The forms of the fingers his left hand are confusing, same with his right on the ground. I also think the shading of the tibia of his right leg is too dark as well make it look as though the leg is split in half. The form of the head is great though. I feel the roundness there and the shadow help. Overall its a great drawing for the four hours, or less because you started a different one first. I feel the best place you can improve is to continue drawing figures so you get a better understanding of the forms of the body. The most important though is that you keep going! Share your next 4 hour drawing as well!
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Christopher Beaven
Looking great! Drawing containers can be very hard to get all the subtle curves, ellipses, etc... And you accomplished it really well. the only think that looked kinda off were the peaches. Their softness isn't matching the loose brushwork over the rest of the painting. Other than that, fantastic! Keep it up!
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Real Jr
Asked for help
Some days passed since my last post, i just finished the number 100 box and to make things right, i decided to pick 10 randon number from 1 to 100 to take some photos of the pages that contains those number so i could post some boxes impersonally to ask if you think that may i go to the next lesson "countor lines, textures and construction". Thanks for your time one more time. @Christopher Beaven
20220823 104833
20220823 104822
20220823 104807
20220823 104755
20220823 104643
20220823 104622
20220823 104543
20220823 104506
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Christopher Beaven
Great idea on randomizing the choice that way you're not picking only the best to show! Yes! Keep moving on. Believe me you will get a ton of practice on drawing form in space through DAB. Even if you're boxes aren't great right now the rest of the course will still train your ability to render 3D form. Sorry for delay in reply I've just finished moving to a new house. Yay! I will try and connect more soon.
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Christopher Beaven
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Isaiah
Stan said to draw the Loomis head 100 times... So, I took up that challenge. The attached image represents 14 pages from my sketchbook. Most of the angles were from a Japanese action pose book. Others were from imagination or from figures I have in my hobby room. Repeating a fundamental exercise so many times made me feel as though I was really putting in quality mileage. I'll need to do similar 100x marathons for other fundamental exercises. My understanding of the Loomis head evolved during this run. (Hopefully, not in the direction of solidifying misconceptions). For instance, at the beginning, I was sometimes making the front of the face too flat. Also, I began the run depicting the plane change line framing the faces as a c-curve which was always concave towards the ears (i.e., It "sweeps" toward the ears.). I eventually noticed that, from the front view, this c-curve was concave towards the face (i.e., It "wraps" around the face.). Using the 3D model provided in the course material. I discovered that the transition in the direction of concavity, visually, changes at the 3/4 view. At the 3/4 view, this curve is a straight line. ...Another important visual transition that occurs at the 3/4th view, is that the oval of the head side plane perfectly touches the outer circle of the cranium sphere. If you rotate the head from this point towards the side view, a gap appears separating the side plane oval and the outer circle and the side plane oval starts moving to the center point of the outer circle. Alternatively, if you rotate the head towards the front view, the side oval begins to "chop off" the outer circle of the cranium sphere. From some angles, I chose to depict the side planes as "toeing-in" towards the face slightly (such that the side plane ovals are visible from the front view). This is based on something I noticed while practicing from another drawing resource. I only feel 70% confident that this is correct, though. Towards the end of the run, I experimented with depicting the cheek line as an "s-curve" from certain angles. I do not feel confident that this was correct.
100 Loomis Heads
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Christopher Beaven
Wow! Love all the hard work you put in, great job! The next step here is to take your knowledge to the real world and work on some portraits that you take to a finish but start out using the Loomis head. I've found that many of these foundational methods are great for certain areas of art but fall apart with others. For example, the loomis head is great for establishing generalizations but fails completely when you go to add features. It's a good start and I use it all the time to get an understanding of the form of the head but I like Marco Bucci's course on understanding the head for everything that comes after. Regardless, it's always good to have another tool in your brain to pull out at any time. What art form do you plan to use the loomis head with? Does it help?
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Christopher Beaven
Great studies! How long did each take you? Economy of brush work is so difficult. It takes a ton of focus and knowledge of form. The artists that I've studied for this has been Joaquín Sorolla and John Singer Sargent. But if you want earlier I would go with Franz Hals as well. The essential improvement I can see with your work is getting a deeper understanding of form. What I mean by this is knowing in your head exactly how the body of the horse flows through space so well that you could rotate the horse in any angle and draw it. Of course you don't have to be that good... Like Kim Jung Gi.... but a better understanding will help you render the light on the forms. I point this out because most of the forms in these painting appear flat. They don't have the full illusion of depth they could have. If you want to improve your perception of form I would suggest Drawabox.com lessons. Marco Bucci has a wonderful course called Understanding and Painting the Head that is great as well. And of course Proko manichenization. (which I never spell right) Hope that helps! Keep up all the hard work!!! Very inspiring, I need to paint more!
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