Scott Camazine
Scott Camazine
Boalsburg, Pennsylvania
Just an old man, with a passion for nature, art and anatomy
Scott Camazine
This was a fun exercise. I got a bit carried away making an armature since I have a woodshop, but it probably was not worth the effort to try to use less clay by making a fuller armature. I included a few shots of the earlier part of the process. It took me a while to figure out why the front view in the initial stages looked so weird (the top of the head being too wide and large). I am not finished with this yet, so please send me LOTS of criticisms and suggestions. I think I will mold this in silicone (using cheap hardware store 100% silicone. It works well for me) But I do hope that Andrew will give us some instruction on mold-making as well
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Scott Camazine
Also, I forgot to mention that I got carried away a bit with the details and could not resist putting in a suggestion of the eyes and lips. But if I do make a mold, I can then re-use this same sculpt, either making it more abstract and simplified, or perhaps trying to make the head more feminine.
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Ray Manning
The pictures aren’t the best, we are remodeling our kitchen. My usual spot is no longer available until that is finished.
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Scott Camazine
Hi Ray. It would be helpful if you took photos that were at eye level instead of the angles you used. Maybe you can send a new set of photos when your kitchen is done! I think some of your proportions are off. I took photos of my attempt and brought them into Photoshop and overlaid them on Andrew's simplified head. In photoshop you can overlay two images and adjust the transparency. This is a good way to see if your proportions are right, and where they are off.
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Roy Nottage
I've got a bit behind schedule, oops. Will catch up. Started this assigment with the boden method (which I've decided I Iike a lot), and blocked out from there. Used my previous ref (and the early pancake... bit risky?) to help with the profile. In hindsight, I should've taken photos early and flipped them horizontally once the main shapes were in. Having flipped the front/back photos now, I feel like the symmetry is pretty off. For the smoothing I used a loop tool I made a while back, by clamping loops of nickel wound guitar string into each end of a narrow copper pipe. Then cleaned that up a tissue that has been dabbed with isopropyl myristrate.
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Scott Camazine
Very nice! and helpful to see your starting stage.
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Manthiravel M
Just finished this assignment. Any feedback and critique would be great. I sculpted digitally instead of traditional method. These knowledge can be transferred to methods. Thank you for the lesson Andrew.
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Scott Camazine
Very nice. Are you sculpting in zBrush? The thing I like about digital sculpture is that you can turn on bilateral symmetry and thus do not have to spend so much time making sure the right and left sides are symmetrical!
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Scott Camazine
I thought I would try carving a skull rather using clay for this assignment. I found it quite a bit more difficult to sculpt using ONLY a subtractive process, rather than being able to add and subtract, correcting my mistakes. I laminated pieces of plywood and used their vertical orientation to help me maintain the bilateral symmetry of the skull. My piece is not as abstract as you suggested in the assignment, but I really enjoyed this exercise.
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Scott Camazine
Asked for help
Here is another try. I think the proportions are correct, perhaps the rib cage is a bit large. It is really annoying when the armature shows through later on when you are adding clay. I guess it is always easier to make the head, rib cage and pelvis smaller.
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Scott Camazine
I attached a Loomis head, a rib cage and a pelvis to this armature. I used polymer clay for durability. I am wondering whether the head is a bit large.
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jcooper1582
I just kept messing with these until they began to look smooth like reliefs. Is it important to not work through the time limit?
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Scott Camazine
These are nice! And you have captured the likeness of the models. I like Tom Cruise! I think Tom’s nose needs to be bigger, and it would have helped the likeness to give him a bigger mouth showing his teeth better as in the photo. Look at the angle the nose makes with the upper lip on the second child. It is closer to a right angle in the photo. Also the model’s nose is larger. It surprises me how important are the tiny details in getting a good likeness. The human mind is able to distinguish among thousands, perhaps millions, of faces. Every detail is important!
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dm95409a
As you can see, my first attempt was clunky and awkward with inaccurate proportions. My second one of angelina jolie came out better. I tried to stay close to the 15 minute time limit but to do so felt rushed. However i think that is the point. Just like with gesture drawing, the idea should be many quick starts to both practice and to find the right one to develop further aithout becoming to ttached or invested in a piece that doesnt have a strong foundation. For my third pancake shown in a series of stages, i laid out my building blocks first. I decided to use th Asaro head to do a pancake from life. I also used proportions and planes that i had learned about in previous videos from Stan and from Marco. I took this third pancake further than i think was intended as i liked how it was developing. However, i think these pancakes are supposed to be quick sketches not finished pieces.
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Scott Camazine
Nice work! I should go back and try to do several pancakes as quicker gesture studies. It would help develop skills in achieving an accurate and efficient profile. But it’s been really tough to get somewhere in 15 minutes! The Angelina Jolie study was interesting to examine. It makes me realize the importance of getting the details correct in order to create a good likeness. I think the lips, the chin, and the length of the jaw are each off a bit and are crucial to getting a good likeness. I need to come back to a piece over and over again before I can figure out which details need to be adjusted. And, often making one adjustment messes up another area of the head. So it is really important for me to go slow and get the foundation correct.
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Roy Nottage
Hey guys! Got some pancakes. I spent about 1.5 hrs on first two (myself, then friend), then limited myself to 1 hour on the last (my son). Felt like I learnt a lot on each - and I did get quicker. I think improving my pace to some degree, is definitely something I'd like to develop over this course. I stuck to just using my hands/fingers for these - which felt incredibly tricky for the eyes/lids.
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Scott Camazine
Hi Roy. These are nice! I think the woman came out “best”. You captured her profile very well, paying good attention to her prominent chin, and her nose. And I like her hair. I think that when we capture the important features of the profile, that gives us a good foundation. (Which is what Andrew said!). I found it interesting that even though your self-portrait was off in some areas, it still works very well. (I think your chin needs to be longer as well as the length of your nose [your nose is more delicate], and your brow seems a bit too prominent). I think we all realize that until we do about 100 of these, we are not going to be fully satisfied with our results. Take a look at Clay Artisan Jay on YouTube. (https://youtu.be/mDXtD-S5xTc) I bet he has done thousands of these portraits in clay. My envy is unbearable!!!
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Scott Camazine
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Scott Camazine
My second try. These are taking me a long time to do. And even at 4 inches tall, it’s very frustrating to do the finer details just with my fingers. I also cannot do the entire pancake in one session of an hour. It really helped me to come back hours later, and look at it again, and make adjustments. It seems that every time I look, there is something else that needs to be changed. Also, I found it VERY helpful to rotate the pancake and the photo 180 degrees and take a look at things upside down. I had the ear way too high up at first and had to cut it out and reposition it. It is surprising to me how every angle and measurement is so important. It makes me wonder about caricatures. How do you exaggerate a particular feature and have it still recognizably the same person. (Proko has some drawing lessons on caricatures which I should watch!).
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Scott Camazine
Self portrait 🤣. Fun assignment. More to come. I became frustrated trying to work this small, even though my pancake is 4” tall. I used a dental tool in addition to placing small bits of clay.
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Julia Arrighi
Hi fellow students, What could be improved to achieve more likeness? I'm looking forward to your feedback. Best wishes, Julia
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Scott Camazine
Hi Folks. I have been looking at bas relief portraits on Pinterest to see what kind of techniques are used to get good likenesses and to develop some of the structures that I think we are all struggling with. The eyes, for example, are difficult in profile and it’s easy to put them in the wrong place or to make them too frontal (rather than in profile). I think the eyes of both the women Julia made should be closer to the bridge of the nose. Also take a look at the chin of the black woman. I think it should be more angular. I do like the way you worked the hair on all of the pieces. I would enjoy some instruction from Andrew on doing bas relief sculptures. It may be another instructive way to transition from 2D to 3D work. Finally, here are a few bas reliefs I found on Pinterest, that may be helpful to examine
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Scott Camazine
Here is my submission for "Building Out the Sculpture". I started with one of the PoseSpace figures with a Contrapposto pose that I liked, and then modified the pose in another software program to get a gesture that was "reaching" and somewhat more elongate. My original armature was a bit flimsy, so I added a right-angle pipe. I think I will change this to a hanging armature as you showed in your video. I prefer to be able to sculpt all around the figure without the armature poking through the figure's back. I was having some problems maintaining the correct proportions, even though my armature appeared accurate. So I temporarily superimposed some toothpicks over the form. Each toothpick was 2 heads in length. I would appreciate any critiques you can offer before I move on to filling out the form. Thanks Andrew.
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Scott Camazine
Thank you Andrew. I must admit that even with a correctly proportioned armature, and continually checking the proportions (In terms of the head length units), I often find that my proportions are “wandering”. Perhaps, after several dozen attempts like this, it will become easier 😉
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Scott Camazine
Andrew, your comments are very helpful! Good critiques help us improve!!!!
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Scott Camazine
I am really enjoying this lesson. Here are a few views of my work in progress. I'm using the same pose as in the video (Candle 004). I have bulked up the gesture too much, and am now working on carving back the features. I probably should have worked more slowly from the beginning!!!
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Fioretin
How do you study anatomy from Bridgman? What are the prerequisites or necessary skills/theories you need to learn before delving into that? Also, aside from Bridgman, what others artists or sources would you suggest for beginners to use to learn anatomy? Thank you very much for taking questions from us!
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Scott Camazine
I like Anatomy for the Artist (Sarah Simblet) (lovely photos). Also Anatomy for the Artist: The Dynamics of Human Form (Tom Flint)
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Scott Camazine
Looking forward to the upcoming sculpture course. I think the approach that you and Stan are taking - combining gesture, anatomy, sketching and sculpture - is exciting. I am looking forward to taking my sculpts to a new level.
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