I did a head practice, please give feedbacks :D
6mo
Yiming Wu
So I tried to paint a head from reference image in digital. Although I've been drawing some heads on paper and also have done some digital paintings, this is however my first time painting head study in digital. Maybe 1.5hrs or so. Done in MyPaint. I felt the head isn't tilted "enough", and several places have some measuring problems, otherwise I couldn't really judge because I don't have any "formal" figure drawing experiences, so please give me some feedbacks, like should I blend more in those smooth areas (because I use a hard brush)? Or could you guys share some of your processes regarding how to handle the "flow"? Thank you guys! On the side note I experimented a bit with colour variation, although the ref is black and white. I kinda liked the result.
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Gabriel Kahn
Hey there! Great work! I really like your shapes although you should think about some soft edges as well.
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Yiming Wu
Thanks! I see it indeed made some differences :D
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Jessica Harrison
Your painting is looking good! I really like how you've pushed color variation by pushing those purple tones. You can play a lot with color variation by keeping the value the same of the color but adjusting the temperature. This will help give it that vibrating/energy effect. I feel like you could push some softer edges in the form shadows such as along the cheek and forehead where the form is slowly turning away from the light.
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Yiming Wu
Thanks! I think I could blend more around those areas. They look quite hard at the moment.
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oliver lindenskov
Honestly, I think your own feedback for yourself is pretty spot on, as far as I can tell. I would just do it again, and try to get the right tilt of the head and work on smoothnes of transitions. You have good unity in shadow and light shapes as far as I can tell. As Peter said a light lay in before you start adding tones makes it a lot easier to gauge things like tilt and proportions.
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Yiming Wu
Thanks! I'm not quite used to light lay-ins, on paper I draw heavy and erase a lot. But sure... I see everything draw quite light. I may need to practice more. If I do those lightly my hand is gonna jitter very bad XD
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Peter Anton
The flow that I learned is: 1) block in: using lines to establish shadow shapes 2) add shadows: only one value. Forget about all that reflected light. Squint to simplify and compress shadows! 3) add transitions. This is where we add the midtones If this sounds like a way you want to work, Jon Hardesty's "Essentials of Realism" on Schoolism is great. I'll attach some images of the stuff I've done as his mentee. New Masters Academy can also teach you cast drawing
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Janna van Vliet
I really love this. I totally downloaded the image to flip the canvas to maybe spot something helpful. But I think I will just have to agree with this art work. Really well done! Also, Jon Hardesty is such a knowledgeable and skilled artist, 10/10 recommend. I hope others will be able to help you better then me :D
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Yiming Wu
Oh! Thanks for the suggestion :D. I'll try to see if I can do these steps in digital in a comprehensive way :D
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Marshall Zazen
I love to set down large swatches of color. @Stan Prokopenko does it a ton in his live-streams. I really hope you check out the VODs of those. Similarly to Craig Mullins you have many shapes in your individual strokes. Robert Henri's Art Spirit talks about it a lot. Make a stroke that adds but does not detract. Miyamoto Musashi lands in defense, but really it's attack! ahahaha There is no defense. There is only offense in finishing off a painting. So STRIKE EM! Whoops, I meant stroke. ahahah Sorry bloke. So anyway, Frazetta taught me best. You block like chalk. Just lay it down and measure back and forth what you found. Squint and look at art with fore-finger to knuckle. Measure with sight. Using 3 points of lines off of your bones. That way what you record and transfer is truly set in stone. (pun) ahahah GREAT line strokes. Each one evokes a sense of purple and subtle lighting you may see in real life Ambient Occlusion bounce. AO as they call it in Game Engines. (Using Blender and Unreal Engine [both free] are GREAT for experimenting) And Milt Kahl (One of the Nine Old Men) himself bespoke of using that reference to learn from and never touch again. If you remember it, you won't need reference. That's my take... or rather his take that is now mine. Faces to me are like... bases. You slough the paint on like clay. You build it like sculpture. So doing Sculpy macquettes or clay is a very good handle on understanding. That Proko just launched their 3D platform is most likely planned given the interest in conceptual art as the base formation is the foundation of the cross-lines between 2D-3D. __________________ I think what you have here is great! It's expressive! It's got a lively nature of it that gets me! We must recall Kintsugi. Allow yourself to breathe and see. The stress of mistrusting perfection is quite a killer according to Frank Herbert. When we are calm, you may spy what is amiss or enlarged. I may see one or two but the overall form is headed in the right direction of expression. Love to be sloppy! You can tighten lines anytime! Craig Mullins, the grand-master, is basically an impressionist. He just uses texture where he wants and lets light push and pull. When it comes to accuracy, Blind Contour studies. Draw without looking at the page. No cursor (dot reticle from FPS games). Just let your hand and eye be one. That will help with copy but if Vermeer taught me anything with his Camera Obscura, it is that a copy is never as good as what you may add to it. He did not copy, but rather composed all lines to converge on perpendiculars. That is why he creates IMMEDIATE stillness. The truth is that you MUST add to what you see. It is no possible to copy. Monks in Japan has tried for years to make "dots out of order". It is impossible for the mind to allow itself to do so without some form of thought. The question remains what thought you will put into your stroke! <3 Great work! Keep it up Yu! <3 It amazes me to see what you do!
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Yiming Wu
Whoa man you got a lot of reference there I'll have to look up :D thanks for all the resources. I find that I might still need some sort of smoothness to portions of the image, like for the face, I find it better to be smoothed out but I still like the variation in brush strokes. Maybe I need to smooth it on a larger scale, and re-apply some strokes in smaller scale, that might look more dynamic overall. Blind contour? I'm not sure I get the point though... is that for building a muscle memory for how shape flows? Sounds quite interesting to me. I'm using a Surface Pro so I was drawing on the screen, not the tablet though. I'll look into the method and see what I can do with it.
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