Peter Cohen
Peter Cohen
Santa Cruz
I create to connect. Life, fantasy, abstract.
Peter Cohen
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Peter Cohen
Here's my direction for the snowball fight, any suggestions for composition, shapes, anything else?
snow ball fight
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John Carter
There is nothing - repeat NOTHING wrong with using reference. All professionals (and many non) use non-copyrighted reference in their day-to-day assignments. They'll photo-bash and do paint-overs. This is perfectly acceptable and helps meet deadlines. But---- use this approach carefully when in school. You really need to learn how to draw first. Tracing reference can be a valuable learning tool. It can help you recognize proper proportions and other relationships in those things that you are learning to draw and paint. Trace a figure or building (or whatever) and note the important proportions, shadow shapes, etc. Now, set the tracing paper aside (or turn off that pshop layer, what all) and use your eye to do the same assignment. Note what you have learned and what you have missed. Study your reference some more, trace it some more, freehand it some more. Nothing wrong with this approach to learning at all. Cheers!
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Peter Cohen
Thanks, sounds like tracing and photo-bashing are common time-saving strategies but the more I practice without tracing the better I'll get at making decisions about how to construct things
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Peter Cohen
Hi, I've been practicing digital painting and consuming a lot of information. I've stumbled upon a lot of comments about how people use references. I'm curious if anyone knows the general culture around using references as a professional. I've read instances where a photo of a building for example is pasted into photoshop. Some windows were added, a new door etc. The details of the bricks in some areas, and other things, remained intact from the original photo. Normally I draw from memory or with the reference to the side and practice until I get it right free-hand. I think my work would improve greatly if I traced, or sampled colors/textures from photos. What's the general culture around this in a professional setting? After learning more about how commonly references are loosely traced, colors/textures sampled etc. it puts some of the paintings that I felt like I could never do into a realm that seems a bit easier to reach than what I originally thought.
Peter Cohen
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Peter Cohen
It was a routine day until Lemar spotted suspicious activity. He leaned over to take a closer look.
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Shelvs Fleurima
Asked for help
The is something off with her checks and forehead. I am trying to get better, can you guys help me figure it out? SVP
DEEC1ED8 770A 45CB 9A40 BBCA5F2F5AD5
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Peter Cohen
hey @Shelvs Fleurima , one thing that jumped out at me was the direction of the light. Is the light only coming from above? If so, the forehead would look darker because of the hat. There could be two light sources one from above like you are showing, but also one from below. In that case the nose might not have as much shadow underneath. I really like the contrast and style of this drawing, thanks for sharing!
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Peter Cohen
these are great! I also aspire to draw from imagination but get stuck with characters/other-things that look very static or stiff. Any suggestions for how to improve that? Your sketches look very alive, dynamic, interesting
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Peter Cohen
Here's a movie poster of my life depicted as a sci-fi mystery!
June
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Carsten
Hi, I always enjoy seeing someone practice gesture since I have been trying to improve my understanding of it for a while now as well. I believe to see a couple of difficulties I had too, so I will jump right in! (The amount of text is proportional to the amount of encouragement I'm trying to convey - not the amount of mistakes). First, what I learned is, that gesture is not equal to figure drawing as a whole or to drawing things that look nice necessarily. Gesture drawing is concerned with what is going on, not only based on the visible shapes, but also movement wise, regarding force, weight and balance or even emotionally, with what the person intends to do. This is also why there are a lot of different attempts to capturing gesture. While Proko tries to make gesture look clean to some degree, leading to it being closer to a figure drawing, other artists are not at all concerned with that. I recommend looking at different strategies and trying them out. Personally, working through the first 30 pages of Nicolaides "The natural way to draw" helped me immensly in understanding gesture as an independet part of the figure drawing process. You can find the complete text online. Alphonso Dunn sums up this "looseness" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvjB0rj6yAc&t=328s . Just add it to the list of Lea. Some remarks which are more on the sympomatic, less important side: Spending 5 minutes on each gesture drawing is quite long. I would recommend some timed practice with 30s - 2m. You might find, that this is not enough time to put everything in the picture, which is just what one wants, because clothes and objects do not belong in a gestural drawing, unless they help you convey the point. As an example, I think it worked out in picture 3 while you could have achieved a more gestural representation by trying to see the motion through the clothes in picture 4. Well this got a bit lengthy. Sorry! Good luck!
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Peter Cohen
Thanks for posting, I'm learning a lot from the responses! In my experience pushing the gesture more extreme, for example drawing more of a bend of the hips than you think you see, makes it look more natural in some cases. The angle of the body really adds to the feeling of movement and looseness. Also, one thing that helped me with making things look dynamic and balanced is having at least one of the feet under the head if they are in a standing pose. Just remembering that can help you push the other limbs to extreme and still make the figure look balanced. I'm 36 too employed as a researcher/scientist, really unrelated to drawing but I'm practicing too after work!
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Peter Cohen
Hi, looking for some feedback as I push this further. Any suggestions for changing big shapes/colors before I move in for detail?
WIP
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Peter Cohen
Sorry to hear about Marlow, looks like a fun dog! I really appreciate the clear anatomy and negative spaces between limbs. I read @Blaise Chambers review and I agree the pose could perhaps be pushed a little more and in my opinion the front leg could be extended and back leg extended a bit too, almost leaping to really fit with the movement lines and dust rings. To me the left eye could be a little bit smaller(?) It's behind the right eye and it appears bigger but it's further away. In any case as other reviewers have mentioned it's great as is. If you left it alone it would be a hit. Thanks for sharing and opening this up for critique!
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Peter Cohen
Hey Matthew, I appreciate the triangular and stable shape of the body/composition. The varied line weight and clear shapes is really cool. I wonder if the left piece (character's left) of clothing could drop a bit more because it looks like it goes straight across the chest even though the button is undone. It's not quite clear on the torso what material the character is wearing. The legs it looks like fabric but it looks a bit stiff on the torso. I enjoy the atmosphere created by the broken lines of the dust/clouds in the background. Makes me want to learn more about this character. thanks for sharing!
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Peter Cohen
Hey Adam, I enjoy the hair shapes framing the body, it gives a sense of depth. Moving the ears down a bit might help, she looks like she is looking straight ahead so the bottom of the ears might line up more with the bottom of the nose and the top of the ears line up with the eyebrow. Unless the head is tilted down in which case the ears would appear more like how you drew them. Cool composition and framing, thanks for sharing!
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Peter Cohen
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Peter Cohen
@Lasse Jin Voldbirk @Adam Wiebner @Liandro thanks for the comments, fun challenge, looking forward to more!
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Peter Cohen
Really nice drawing! I enjoyed studying it, I always learn when I look in here for inspiration. I read your comment about shading and the deltoid and I have some suggestions after analyzing things in photoshop. If your goal is to get very close to the photograph then there are a couple issues with the torso and the leg, I traced over the figure in the photograph and put it over the drawing. I don't think the drawing needs to match the photograph 1:1, the drawing is believable but I wanted to point that out in case it's important to you. I looked at the deltoid and what stands out to me is the value range of your drawing makes the deltoid look a little bit different shape than it is in the photograph. The deltoid on the picture has softer shading and contrast relative to other areas. The drawing is impressive as it is now and those are just a few things that jumped out at me. I often struggle with where I want to land in terms of photorealism and stylized drawing. My goal is to be able to choose and it's quite a lot of work in both directions proportion and technical on one side, design and shape-appeal on the other. Do you or anyone else reading this have any thoughts on that?
tracing
deltoid
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Peter Cohen
Hi! Nice horse drawing. It depends on what your goal is. If it's to make the horse look more realistic or true to the photograph I have a suggestion. Place your drawing over the photograph and see how things line up. I use photoshop but you can print out and use a light underneath if you don't have photoshop. Since a photograph has a lot of information in it (values, color etc.) sometimes I trace and then use the tracing instead to check my drawing. Seeing the picture with just lines/contour helps me focus on what is important (I really like proportion and line weight to look good). You have a lot of the components lined up but you can see with the comparisons I attached the eye is a little low and the body is pointed more toward the camera than what you drew. Hope this helps!
trace over original drawing
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Liandro
Hey, Peter, this looks like an interesting situation for a goblin, did you have a story in mind when you came up with it? I wonder if it would be possible to give his facial expression more emphasis, perhaps enhancing the intensity of the expression, or maybe pushing the design to make his eyes and brows pop more? Maybe give him a "thought bubble" sentence (maybe not literally write it on the drawing if you don't want to, but think what it could be in your mind), this could help you make design decisions more deliberately, since it would back up for what the character is thinking or feeling. Also, since he looks so weak, perhaps you could draw the body gesture to communicate that in a more exaggerated way, such as curving the spine some more, maybe make the shoulders drop down more heavily so that he would look even more debilitated and have to make a greater effort to raise his head. Just a few ideas. :)
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Peter Cohen
@Liandro Roger Thanks for the response! I added more detail to the face to indicate how tired the character is. I found the circles under the eyes really helped. I also changed some of the proportions and gesture to look more tired including your suggestion on lower shoulders. The ears and nose are also a little more droopy. I think it helped push this further really appreciate the feedback!
goblin beggar version 2
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Stan Prokopenko
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Peter Cohen
Hi everyone, I drew this last night using Photoshop and I want to know how I could make it better. The arms and other features are exaggerated but I want the figure to look believable (as believable as a begging goblin could be). Any comments on perspective, form, design, whatever else are appreciated! Thanks!
goblin beggar