Steve Lenze
Steve Lenze
Los Angeles
Professional artist from the animation industry. traditional 2D animation. storyboard. character design.
Steve Lenze
looks like you need to rethink how this character is going to bend his knees. Make sure the costume makes it clear where and how the joints move.
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silentmoonss
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@Jesper Axelsson @Steve Lenze Hi! it’s been a while.If and wen u have time please provide me any feedback it’s much appreciated. Hope you’re still going strong with your art journeys.
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Steve Lenze
I think these look pretty nice. The gesture looks good, proportions look pretty good, and the structure looks pretty solid. I think stepping away from the figure and drawing something else is a good thing every now and then. No matter what you draw, it will still increase your skill, and will make your figure drawings better.
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Steve Lenze
Okay, just because your favorite artist does it a certain way, doesn’t mean that’s why their art is good. There are plenty of amazing artist in the game industry that use line art. Do yourself a favor and look at an artist named John Grello, very few people can draw or paint like that guy. if you do you really great, then your stuff will look professional, line or not.
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Steve Lenze
what jumps out at me is the perspective of the lampshade is off, and it is creating a tangent with the face.
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Anubhav Saini
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Steve Lenze
Hey Anubhav, sorry, I’m in the process of moving and I don’t have access to my computer right now. I will say you have a good mixture of shots and your characters emotions are apparent in not just their facial expressions but also their body language. There are some perspective, and composition things you could improve on, but that would be easier for me to show you in a draw over… which I can’t do right now, sorry. Give me some time and I’ll get to it.
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silentmoonss
@Steve Lenze @Jesper Axelsson sorry for tagging u if you’re busy but if u could please provide some feedback when u have time.
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Steve Lenze
Hey, sorry I haven’t been able to comment on these, I’ll be away from my computer for a few weeks. When I can, I promise to give you some feedback. Keep it up:)
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Frank D'souza
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Steve Lenze
Hey Frank, I agree completely with what @Danet said. His critique is right on.
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Steve Lenze
I like this, especially your sketch, it has a lot of energy. I think the way you drew the arms is pretty good, they feel very dimensional and solid. The torso and lower body though looks very flat because you used too many straight, flat lines. I did a quick diagram to show you some of the things that I noticed in your drawing and what you could do to help keep things dimensional in the future. I hope it helps :)
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Steve Lenze
Ambient light comes from somewhere, either a window or door or skylight, it can even come from a lamp. What happens to make it ambient and not directional per say, is that the light bounces all over the place, filling in all the shadows and diffusing the light by scattering it everywhere. So, even though the light is ambient, it can still be brighter on some planes than others. The planes that are turned away from this light will be darker, but what keeps them from being dark shadows, is all the light bouncing around filling in those planes with light. I hope I explained that in a understandable way and I hope that helps :)
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Steve Lenze
I agree with @Jesper Axelsson , I think these look pretty good. They have a nice dimensional feel to them, and they have forced you to really see the pinch and stretch, as well as the twist. Nice work :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey discoaquinas, I agree with the critiques you have already had by Dwight and Danet. I will say that there really isn't any reason to draw the body unless it's doing something. Always start with gesture to keep the body fluid and not stiff like your drawing. Notice everything is straight and even? Then use structure to give your figure some dimension and 3D qualities. Then add your anatomy and details. This progression will help you going forward to create more convincing, solid and interesting figures. I did a sketch to show you what I mean, I hope it helps :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey Marek, Gesture is the rhythm of the body from head to toe. It tells us the "story" of the pose, or what is happening in the pose in a fluid way. There is no need to really worry about anatomy or details, just the flow of the body, what makes the pose beautiful. I did a quick sketch to show you how I would approach gesture in these poses. Notice how nothing is stiff or angular, Just flow :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey Marek, I like this idea of using these figure to practice drawing, they can be very informative. The problem is that if we fail to give the pose gesture, it will look stiff. That's why I would suggest you also sketch from movies, so that you can really feel what the figure is doing. For instance: your first figure is walking, so, all the weight would be on his right foot. That would drive the right hip up, adding a pinch on the right side where the torso bunches up with the hip. I did a quick sketch to show you some of the things that I think will help you as you go forward, I hope it helps :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey silentmoons, I agree with what the others had to say about your proportion and balance, and you should follow that advise. I want to add to that what I see in your drawings. Mostly, you are finding the gesture in the limbs of the body. Short gestures that describe some parts of the pose. To be an effective gesture drawing, we need to find gesture lines that describe the whole pose, including the head, from the top to the bottom. This gives the whole body a rhythm and fluidity that makes the figure so beautiful. I did a quick sketch over some of your poses to show you what I mean, I hope it helps :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey Ieva Paleja, I think you did a pretty good job, actually, I think you did too good a job. Medieval art is not known for it's gesture and is pretty stiff when it comes to the poses. I think your pose has more gesture than I think the original has. It's good to see all that gesture drawing is stuck in your brain :) Art from this time also doesn't use perspective or proportions the way we do. Again, I think yours is probably better than the original in that regard. Just look at that right arm and the size of those hands. This is a good exercise though, keep it up :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey W.I.M.U, Nice job on this portrait, you managed to capture his attitude pretty well. The thing about portraits is that if you are off a little here and a little there, it adds up and causes all kinds of problems. Usually in likeness. I think you got quite close, but you will notice in my diagram that some areas were off by just a bit. Also, shape design is very important, as well as angles. We have to make sure the shape and the negative shape all agree. Not just the shape of the eye, but the shape of the area around the eye. If our angles are off, then things wont line up properly and can mess up our proportions. All of what I said above is also true of the shadow shape and light shapes. I hope this helps :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey Dwight, This is cool reference, and your drawing is pretty good. I can see that you were having trouble with the inking, and digital can be hard if you don't have the right brush. What you have here is what is called a "dead" line. It has no taper or bounce, it is the same all the way through the stroke. There is nothing wrong with that, Gary Frank does this kind of inking amazingly. It does require an understanding of how you create different values with line, something I think you are struggling with here. When I ink, I use a brush that is pressure sensitive for opacity and thickness. That allows me to use it more like a brush. To create different values with ink lines, has to do with the closeness of the lines. If the lines are very close, you get a dark value, if far apart, a light value. This can also be achieved by crossing lines over each other in different directions. I did a quick sketch to show you what I mean, I hope it helps :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey Henrique, I like these sketches, they really show the personality of the animals. I suggest you draw animals the same way you would humans: gesture, and structure. Structure is important with animals because we can get caught up in their details and flatten our drawings. If we make sure all the main masses of their bodies are working 3 dimensionally as well as in perspective, things become a little easier. I did a quick sketch over your horse drawing to show you what I mean, I hope it helps :)
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Steve Lenze
As long as the shapes inform the final drawing, then you can erase them. You just want to make sure people feel those shapes under the drawing.
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edodum
So hard, especially the thumb, I can't place it even after 15 trials.
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Steve Lenze
Hey edodum, These hands are actually pretty good, nice drawing! A couple of things I noticed is that you were a little sloppy with using the creases and lines in the hand and fingers to show perspective. This might be why your thumbs just didn't look right. Also, try to use corners in your drawings to help sell the structure a little more. I did some drawing to show you what I mean, I hope it helps :)
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Steve Lenze
Hey Anthony, This is a pretty ambitious portrait your doing here. Doing a portrait, from a different angle then the reference, with lighting from another reference is quite hard. Even more advanced artist would struggle with this a bit. But, it can be done if you take the time to analyze the reference face to understand the proportions. What I did was create a diagram that shows the proportions of the reference and then the proportions from your drawing. I think you will see the difference, and understand why your proportions look off. Also, the lighting reference you are using is a face made of hard edged planes, this young lady has a soft, rounded face, so your shadows and edges need to reflect that. I hope you find this helpful :)
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