Mengu Gungor
Mengu Gungor
Ohio
Marco Sordi
2021/8/4. Hello everyone. Here's my new long drawing. Thanks for any advice or suggestion. Have a good day.
IMG 4119
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Beautiful drawing. One thing that jumped out at me was the balance of the figure. She is about to fall out of her coupé. You can exaggerate gesture, but you still want to make sure whatever gestural mass you're adding to one side, is added/exaggerated on the other side of the balance line as well, or you may need to move the point of contact (in this case her foot), to compensate for where you are moving her center of mass. Example: Girl on the right in the photo has too much of her weight across her point of contact, and is about to fall over.
marcosordi img 4119 960x720x1
SAB MGZEAO 15 no credit sm 0
Reply
Mengu Gungor
Depends on what tool you're using... If you're using graphite, newsprint doesn't work very well, you won't be able to see what you're drawing, especially if you have a light touch. If you're using charcoal or conte crayon, newsprint is great. If you're using markers, you might bleed through on newsprint or printer paper, depending on the marker/quality of paper, but if your hand moves quickly, it's less likely to happen, and not too big a deal if it does. If you like to experiment with different mediums, take that into consideration as well. So think of the combination of your tools when making the decision. Also, nothing says you can't have multiple kinds of paper for gestures... Hope this helps.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Excellent work! There are a few things you might be able to improve. Below I have a manipulated image of your reference with a filter. The white/yellow parts are the highlight, the green is the midtone, the blue is the shadow tones (which include core shadow, reflected light and cast shadow). You are missing some midtone on the bridge of the nose, yours seems to go too sharply from highlight to core shadow. This is more pronounced in the ball of the nose, where a fair amount of midtone is missing. On the nasal ala (wing of the nose) you have a highlight, that's not actually there, it's all midtone. It simply looks lighter because of all the surrounding darker areas. This is an easy and common mistake to make. When in doubt, think about the planes and the light. There are no planes on the ala that face the light directly, so there shouldn't be a highlight. And remember, midtone is part of the light family, and darkest light should be lighter than the lightest dark. And one last point I wanted to make, the contrast seems a little high, you went quite dark with the shadows. This may be intentional to create a better picture, but for Bargue studies, since part of the practice is to discipline control of the values, next time you could challenge yourself to match a more subtle overall look. This will probably take more time, as you will need to build values up slower. But it is quite rewarding. Hope this helps, really great work, keep on sketching!
nose1
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
I think you could put the vanishing points a little farther apart. I see the head as tilted away from us a bit, so I'd draw the horizon line at an angle accordingly. Here is what I'm seeing...
IMG 9545
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Kristian Nee
Hey Mengu! Great job on this, the drawing is definitely on it's way to being a really strong one. A couple things I might say are to define your shadow shapes more, and clean up the structure of the hands, more specifically her right wrist feels flat. Also I think if you were to make the face plate of her head wrap the forms of the head more, it would do a lot for determining the lighting. Great job though and good luck!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Thank you so much Kristian. I did have challenges with the hand, good note on the wrist. And I'll try to observe and indicate facial planes better next time.
Reply
Yiming Wu
Interesting... To me a mixed lighting condition most of the time can be though like a diffuse light coming from approximately above or from the window, depending on which is stronger, and shadows should fade a bit quicker. On drawings maybe treat one as a major light source, and mentally tune down some of the others can be good. Nice drawing! Although the leg might be a bit too thick? or maybe the shape is like that
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Thank you so much for the feedback Yiming. I did try to focus on one light and ignore the rest, but areas farther from that light source are flooded with other lights, so it was challenging. I'll probably try to invent a bit more next time, like you suggested. The leg is a bit foreshortened, I may have slightly exaggerated the thick to thin, it will probably be more apparent to me when I look at this again in a few weeks. Thank you for pointing it out.
Reply
Mengu Gungor
3w
Started Life drawing sessions on Saturdays again, and here is day 1 after over a year break. Lighting was kind of all over the place, but I did what I could. I changed gesture slightly, moved hips forward a bit, and tilted the head. Tips welcome for things to focus on, and how to draw in a room where there is light coming in from every which direction.
IMG 9540
Elias Lemus
Nice work! My suggestions are as follows.. both the time management and not knowing what to focus on can be alleviated at least a bit by starting each piece with an intention. What is your goal? Are you practicing anything in specific? Value? Color? The effects of light? Proportion? This will help you put an emphasis on one or maybe a couple things and as far as what to focus on, is there a weakness you'd like to strengthen? Or maybe there's a certain thing about the model or scene that moved you more than anything else. Hope that helps.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Thank you Elias, that makes a lot of sense. Since I can focus on proportion, likeness, anatomy, during regular studio life drawing, I'll try to focus more on color and light next chance I get to paint a figure outdoors.
Reply
Steve Lenze
Hey Mengu, These are nice paintings, plein air is pretty hard. I made a few notes that I hope will help. Keep up the good work :)
painting
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Thank you so much for the always valuable feedback Steve. That little sign that's drawing the eye away was something I should have addressed, but talked myself into leaving as is... It was in my initial 3-value study and made sense to balance the left side, but doesn't really serve the final image. I should have brought the value way down to something closer to other values around it, and left it as a hue change only for interest. Thank you.
Reply
Mengu Gungor
Did some outdoor figures this week, and just sharing them here. This was my first experience painting the figure outdoors from life (I'm used to drawing with studio lighting). The sitting pose was the first day. It was a shorter session, between 2 and 3 hours. We started the standing pose on day two, I worked primarily on values this day, but it started raining part way. So we went inside, and I worked on a quick portrait sketch. Third day started with a bit of rain, but we had the model take the standing pose indoors, it was good enough to fix some "drawing" issues. The rain stopped about 20 minutes later, and we were able to go back outside. However, the wind did not stop. Joys of plein air. The sitting pose was under the cover of some tree shades with a bit of sunlight streaming down. The standing pose was generally just an overcast sky. I have a different approach to painting figures vs landscapes, and combining them was an interesting challenge (one of many). Happy to hear any feedback or tips as I'd like to try this again some time. I felt I was particularly bad at time management and what to focus on. All sketches done in Procreate on iPad Pro.
IMG 9529
IMG 9528
IMG 9527
Mengu Gungor
I think this is lovely. I agree with the other commenters, we want a bit more attention to the main subjects. I (perhaps a bit crudely) darkened the surrounding, and brightened the focus area. You probably don't have to go as far, but you can merge some of the shapes into the background, like that black train in front was drawing a lot of attention. Also your reflected lights are perhaps a bit too strong, they don't have to be that strong to still read well and define your forms, so I toned them down a bit. And I sharpened some edges in the areas we want the viewer to look at. You can definitely spend more time to do it all better. I absolutely love the story telling you have here.
IMG 9521
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Looks pretty good. I have some nitpicky things on the last image if you'd like to improve on them. The short lines like the ones indicating the depth of the windows and short side of the awning should follow the perspective lines. The dormer windows seem to be leaning forward a bit and the junction of the roof top is a bit confusing since it doesn't agree with the slope the dormer windows suggest. You may have to figure out where you want that roof corner to be, going up from the plane of the second floor ceiling. Also the perspective lines should go exactly to the vanishing point, not in its general vicinity when studying perspective. And one last thing, you may already be doing this, I just don't see any guidelines for it, be sure to find your midpoints geometrically for centering things, like the center muntin of the window pane. In case you don't know how to do this, you can simply draw a corner to corner cross on the window, and where they intersect is your midpoint. Be sure to do this on the full pane (not just the visible portion of the pane). Hope all these words make sense, if not, let me know, I'd be happy to explain with a diagram.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
You captured that old school feeling, I like it! His weight is centered a little too far behind his feet, so he doesn't quite look balanced. And I'm not sure how he's wearing those bracelets, looks like they might fall off, if he lowered his arm down, and his helmet may be cutting into his ears. If these are intentional, it's fine but otherwise, it's a good idea to think about function when sketching. Also the shield could use a bit of thickness, it looks paper thin. Values look maybe a little low contrast, but I think that adds to the old school look. Otherwise, the style looks consistent. If you wanted to make shadows darker, lights lighter, you could certainly do that. Depends on what sort of feel you want. You can always try on a new layer and see how you like it, or just try it on your next piece. Keep on sketching!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
There is a lot of good advice here, but I just wanted to say, where you're at is a perfectly normal place to be. So don't worry about committing crimes against art... And don't feel like you have to "nail" a course before moving on. Do the exercises, spend some time to absorb the information, and move on. Keep in mind, you don't have all the information yet to create beautiful drawings. Once you've gone through everything, you'll want to circle back, and do it all over again. It gets progressively better. Keep practicing!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
You can use smoother paper like bristol or hot press watercolor paper, you need a very sharp pencil, you need to go lightly, slowly, and patiently, and let the graphite fill out the texture. If you use a blending stump you still want to be very gentle with it, and not smash the paper texture. You can watch Stephen Bauman talk about and demonstrate this process in many of his videos. Also with a brush you can get some fairly light tones, and can control the value pretty well in that lighter range. You can also use graphite powder, if you need a large area of tone. You can use chamois cloth. You can use a cotton swab. You can use crumpled paper. You can experiment!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Have you tried using SketchClub on the iPad? It's a sketching app, it has a vector tool (which should be called enclosure tool), that might fit quite well into your workflow of working from silhouette with lasso tool. I can see you are super used to photoshop lasso/fill/erase routine and are super fast with it, but it might feel more natural to have the tool fill as you make the enclosure. Anyway, I haven't used it in a while (here is a really old sketch to show you how it sort of feels: https://app.sketchclub.com/sketch/4998401559887872). If you have tried it I'd love to hear your thoughts.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Looks good conceptually. The outfit tells us a good bit about the character, so I like that. There are some symmetry issues, like his left hand holding the cup is larger than his right. Probably both hands need to be adjusted to be somewhere between the two, but stylistically you could err on the side of the larger hand if you want. His right arm looks a little awkwardly pronated. His left hand holding the cup doesn't seem like it's holding a round object, and the thumb is not really doing its job for how one would hold a cup. One stray finger is okay when holding an object that size, but I'd make it either the index finger or pinky that's stray. With his body type, I would tie that sweater around his waist line, a little higher than where it's at, so it doesn't keep slipping down. My recommendation would be to think about function, and use reference. For instance hold a cup like you want your character to hold a cup, and study what your fingers are doing. Keep it up!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Looks good so far, looks like you have your ideas down. You now probably just need reference, and keep painting. I threw together a few ideas for you without knowing exactly what you have in mind as an example. I'd suggest creating a board like this, be sure to include a few images for mood, color, style, etc from artists you like. These references will inform your painting. Feel free to modify them right on your board as needed (I did that for the crop top). And you may want a few refs for lighting as well, so you can have an idea of the light/shadow contrast you want for rendering. Hope this helps ^_^
BlindfoldGirlRefs
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
Hi Marco, I've been a fan of your work and your teaching videos for a few years now, since I discovered them. I love how you add color variations around the same value to add interest to your work. I'm still quite timid about this approach, and the variations I add tend to be barely a step away from the adjacent color (or grey). Can you give some examples of what artists have inspired you down this path, maybe with different styles? I feel perhaps seeing this concept in different styles may help me incorporate it into my own work better. Thank you!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mengu Gungor
I am curious, why are you trying to draw with charcoal? What is the quality you want out of it? In what environment are you trying to use it? Classroom? Life drawing? drawing from photo reference at home? What subjects? Portrait? Figure? Still life? How big or small do you like to work? I feel we all have to find the best tools that work for us, for the subjects, size, and style we're looking for. Charcoal is not always the right tool. It was great for me when learning initially, because it didn't allow me to worry too much about small details, and forced me to focus on the big shapes and proportions. Since you can quickly get dark values, it's also an advantage in time limited environments. You also have to think of it more as a sculpting tool than a drawing tool. If you want to render a small eyeball with graphite pencil, you might be used to starting with an outline. If you try to do this with charcoal, it can be pretty frustrating. You want to start with a dark blob that describes the big shadow shape of the eye socket, and carve into it with an eraser, working back and forth with eraser and charcoal to refine that shadow shape, and then start adjusting values inside that shape. It's nice to learn this process because then you can apply it to graphite, paint, digital, and the process still works. I don't know where you're at with your drawing experience, but I will say, this is a common problem, for beginners trying charcoal for the first time. They try to draw contours, the charcoal is going all over the place, and it fails even worse than the way their graphite contour drawings were failing. But if you're at a place in your art life where you have a working methodology that performs well for you with other tools, you have to examine your goals of what you are trying to achieve with charcoal, and it simply may not be the right tool for you.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message