Luigi Manese
Luigi Manese
Orange County
Fantasy Illustrator and Character Designer
Luigi Manese
Hi @yeej9354 I think sticking to boxes for the torso would be a good idea since it looks like using a slightly complex form (like the one you're using now) is throwing you off a bit. It also looks like your gesture lines for your figures is getting mixed up with your centerlines, but we can more accurately assess that if you do decide to do another go at these using boxes. It may also help to do some exercises of drawing boxes on a page and making sure the perspective of all of those boxes feel right. If you need help with any of these, feel free to tag me and I can take a look!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Matthew Alexander, the basic procedure of these Notan Master Studies is to try to simplify a painting into big abstract shapes of black and white. It is recommended that you redraw each of your studies instead of tracing over it because this will help to keep your eye for draftsmanship fairly sharp. When you first do these studies the exercise is going to be about analyzing the image and distilling it into it's most important parts. You're going to run into a lot of situations where it isn't clear cut whether 'this part should be black' or 'this part should be white', and when you run into these situations you just want to ask yourself what the image is really about, and THAT should inform your breakdown. Try to notice the focal areas of the original image and make sure your graphic breakdown retains focus in those same areas. If you ever give some of these a shot, feel free to post them! I love doing composition studies so I'd be happy to give some pointers if there are any specific areas that you end of struggling with. Hope this helps!
LuigiManese MidtermHW 01
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Boomblooka
Im pretty new to proko, and I wanted to get better at drawing figures the way I imagine them. Ive done some quick 30 second gesture sketches from images i found online. I think I need improve the proportions. Any recommendations? Thanks!
1628099562702 1887530660
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Boomblooka, to address your question about proportions specifically, are you trying to do these gesture studies with standard adult proportions? If so, I feel like your heads may be slightly too big in comparison to the body. In general, the human body is about 6 - 7.5 heads tall. A lot of your studies look like the bodies are about 5 - 5.5 heads tall, so if you lengthen the rest of the bodies for your future studies then the proportions should feel right. Hope this helps!
Reply
Luigi Manese
Hi @Matthew Rawles, I think what you may be struggling with at the moment is your separation of values. Right now, your values for your lights and your values for your darks are very close together, pretty much right next to each other on the gray scale. Because of this, you are losing the believability of light on your image. I think it may be a good idea to try to nail down the values of your image in grey scale first before heading into color. Since you're working digitally, there are quite a few tools to help you nail down those colors after you establish your portrait in greyscale. Hope this helps! Let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you
Matthew (1)
Matthew (2)
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Christopher Tomley, this is a pretty solid start! This is a bit late but maybe I can give some input that you can take into consideration for your next study (I'm assuming this drawing might already be finished by now haha). So, I googled Grogu and I'm pretty sure I found the image that you were referencing from. From what I can see in the image, Grogu is mostly in shadow, and he has a source of really strong direct light coming from the right side. Having this information is critical because this is what's going to inform our plan for the drawing. So, we want to keep the separation of light and shadow clear on our object, this means that the area of direct light coming from the right side needs to have a clear value separation from everything else (which is in shadow). It looks like you added a lot of detailed information in the fabric which could be simplified more. Most of his clothing is being hit by ambient light, so the value variation between the folds is going to be very subtle. This is the main thing that I tackled in my paint over below. Doing this allows for a clear separation between the direct light, the ambient light, and the ambient occlusion in the deep folds of his clothes. Hope this helps and let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you!
Christopher Tomley
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Natali Santini, on top of Vincentius's critique about designing the limb shapes for your figures, I think I also want to add one more critique: watch out for your proportions! Having proper proportions is one of the hardest things to nail in a drawing, so don't sweat if you might be struggling in this area. The most common pattern I see in your drawings is that your heads feel a bit too small in comparison to the bodies you've drawn. If you make them about 20%-25% bigger, then it should feel right. My critique was pretty simple so if you have any questions regarding Vincentius's critique then I can go more in depth into that principle as well. I'm sure Vincentius can elaborate if you ask them too! Hope this helps!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @mussienko, I love your use of color in all of these studies! I think you have a pretty good self critique of your work, and I think the most impactful thing that you can work on would be to punch up your values. Right now, I think the areas in light and in shadow are not made all that clear. For example, looking at the road in your first painting, it looks like there are some segments of it that should be in light and other segments that are in shadow, however both your light and shadow values are too close to each other to communicate that. In order to get this clear separation of light and shadow, you might have to start either exposing your image to the light, or exposing your image to the shadow. When you expose your image to the light, it means you have a higher value range for objects being hit by light, and you compress the values for objects in shadow. When you expose your image to the shadows, you do the opposite: you have a higher value range for objects in shadow, and you compress the values for objects in the light. I've attached two separate images to illustrate this point. The first image is exposed for the light. Everything that's in shadow has been simplified to black (sometimes dark blue). Everything else is in the light. This allows the artist to get a clear separation of values for light and shadow for even the dark jackets in the scene. The second image shows a painting that is exposed for shadow. Notice how much color information and variation the artist is able to get in the shadows. Also notice that how everything in the light is basically white, in order to achieve that clear separation of value. Hopefully this concept can help as you try to apply it in your future studies. I think the challenge for you is going to be in keeping your color vibrancy while doing this value separation, but push through and your paintings are just going to get stronger. Hope this helps, and let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you!
Mussienko 2
Mussienko
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @persona937, this is a really good study overall so I could only come up with some minor adjustments you may want to keep in mind. In your original study, it looks like the sizes of the eye differed just slightly, which made her expression feel a bit off. I just adjusted the proportions of the eye so that they matched one another. The second thing I did was to darken the shadows on the side of the face. I can see how the shadows in the reference image do feel a bit bright, and the reflected light on her cheek adds to the confusion. However keep in mind that when drawing a directly lit object (like this one), you want to have a clear separation of light and shadow. Other than that it looks great! I really like the charcoal look you got on the shading of her face, and it would be cool to see if you could apply that uniformly to the rest of the image. Hope this helps, and let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you
persona937 (5)
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Valerio Pilotti, these head studies look great! I think one thing you may be struggling with is the structure of the head as it rotates upwards (I have trouble with this angle too honestly). Just keep in mind that as the head starts to rotate up and down, the features (brow line, nose, and mouth) no longer sit at the 'thirds' of the face. Additionally, the head will start to appear smaller at this angle and will have proportions closer to that of a circle. I also did a minor tweak to adjust the structure of the forehead and brow line and the shape of the jaw. Other than that your studies look awesome! Let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you
Valerio
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Bruno Khoueiry-Jaber, from what I can see, it looks like some of your quicker studies have more of that 'Force' that you're looking for. I'm especially seeing it in your second image. In order to create a stronger sense of gesture, you want to find opportunities to simplify some parts of the body to make big sweeping lines. In your second image for example, I like how you simplified the gesture from the head, down to the spine, and to the bottom of the legs, as one big line. In contrast, look at the first image you posted. By spending more time on the drawing, you got more caught up in the details of the drawing and lost opportunities to design and simplify the gesture. Just be aware of the principle and try to apply them in your longer gesture studies and I feel you'll be well on your way to finding that 'Force'. Hope this helps! Let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Vincent Duncombe
Hey @Jesper Axelsson @Luigi Manese @Liandro just letting you all know that I have started the portrait course (likely anatomy next). Starting to get the hang of this a bit. Will be reaching out for assistance as I go through the course if that’s okay. Thanks!
1FD41D5F 6820 4B72 A51A A002A972E4B1
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
That's great to hear @Vincent Duncombe! These studies look very solid and very well constructed, so you're off to a good start. Looking forward to see your future ones!
Reply
Christian Shaw
Hi. Here are my attempts at applying structure to some animals. Feedback is appreciated as always. Thanks!
IMG 1423
IMG 1424
IMG 1425
IMG 1426
IMG 1427
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Great use of construction @Christian Shaw! You've done a good job establishing those contour lines around the forms to make each component feel more solid. The one form that is a bit confusing to me is on your camel drawing. There is an area where the neck connects with the body, and I can't quite figure out how the two parts are being put together. Additionally, one more concept to keep in mind would be the C S I principle, which is laid out in Stan's 'How to Draw Gesture Video' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74HR59yFZ7Y (The concept starts at 5:35) Basically, you want to be able to play C curves, S curves, and Straights (this is the 'I') against one another to make your shapes feel more dynamic. A lot of your limb shapes feel a bit stiff, and I think its because I'm seeing a lot of straights against straights, which takes away from the possible variety you can create from designing these shapes on your own. Hope this helps! Feel free to let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you
Reply
David
Hi, here are some of my bean studies. I generally do one myself and then draw another right next to it after watching Stan. I had the most difficulty with the foreshortening examples (image 3.) as some my attempts ended up quite a bit different than the demo. I'm happy with the fact I used fewer lines than I usually do in this exercise but I'm noticing I could improve my line weight and I feel like the design of some of my shapes gets a bit stiff. Feedback is welcomed and appreciated.
beans 1
beans2
beans 3
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @David, this is a great batch of bean studies. Foreshortening is always going to be a tricky thing to get a grasp of, but I think you've handled your foreshortening studies quite nicely. One of the key things is to make sure that you make your forms clear to the viewer, and I think you've properly used centerlines, as well as that dot on top of the bean, to quickly indicate how the form is turning in space. As far as the design of your shapes go, I do notice a few moments where one side of the bean is treated in the same way as the other side (ie, one side has curves and the other side has curves). This creates a bit of repetition that's stale to the eye, which might be way you feel like some of your bean shapes are quite stiff. Try using the principle of playing straights against curves. Even if you might not necessarily see it in your reference, find opportunities to make liberties with your bean designs to create this appeal. This will probably help your bean designs feel less stiff. Hope this helps! Let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you
David
Reply
Simeon Kotov
Hi! Any criticues are greatly appreciated,thanks!
been4
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Not really a critique, I just wanted to drop in to say that these bean studies are fantastic! I really like how clear your forms are, and I also like how you've designed the shapes of your beans. Great work!
Reply
Kim Ytterberg
These are a few of my quick sketch assignments in chronological order (couldn't attach them all but these are representative enough!). During this week I had a real problem with my carpal tunnel and had to wear a brace which actually helped me as it prevented me from using the wrist at all. It took some time to get used to and my accuracy was way off. But thanks to that I couldn't put lines in without thinking and correcting my lines as I really had to make my hand do what I wanted it to during this short time period. Correcting a line would mean I wouldn't be able to finish the gesture in time as it took so long for me to make my hand to what my head wanted. I would really love any critique on the exercises. The placement/size of the head is something I noticed I struggle with and proportions (torso to legs), when I go back and study Stan it makes sense but when I do them myself I struggle, so feedback regarding this would also be very appreciated. Thanks for taking your time!
IMG 4314
IMG 4315
IMG 4316
IMG 4317
IMG 4318
IMG 4321
IMG 4322
IMG 4323
IMG 4324
IMG 4325
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Kim, these are some great 1 minute gestures! I'm also sorry to hear about the carpal tunnel, HOWEVER I do think it's pretty interesting that the limitation of your brace is actually helping you to learn to draw with your shoulder/elbow instead of your wrist. It might be a good idea to try to wear the brace as often as possible to really sink in this new muscle memory because this will help you avoid future wrist pain and increase the longevity of your drawing career. As far as your studies go, I think it's hard to make a good judgement about your analysis on the proportions of the head since some of these drawings do lack the lay in of the head. From what I can see, I think your head seems a bit too small in comparison to the body, and this might be because you're only using a circle for the basic head shape. If you add in the basic shape of the jaw underneath, it MIGHT help with the problem. One thing I noticed is your use of centerlines for your gestures. As you start moving towards more complex mannequins to represent the figure, you want to make sure that your centerlines are laid in correctly because this is the foundation which you'll use to accurately establish the construction of the main body parts (rib cage, pelvis, etc.) I think the next logical step for your studies would be to use a more complex mannequin to see how well you can construct the form, and making sure that your centerlines are laid in accurately will be a huge part of that. Overall great work! Let me know if there is anything about my critique that I can clear up for you
Kim (1)
Kim (2)
Reply
Luigi Manese
Hi @eleftheria_arts I think the crosshatching technique looks great, I'm especially impressed with how soft you were able to get some of those shadows (like in the cheek area) using this method. I do think that the handling of detail on the hair could be simplified to put a greater emphasis on the face. Additionally, there are some minor areas where the light/shadow seems a bit inconsistent. For example, there are some really dark occlusion shadows under the nose and where the nose meets the cheek, but they should probably be kept lighter because the occlusion of light in those areas aren't that dark. Additionally, there is a patch of light hitting the shadow of her cheek, which I also think should be grouped into the shadows by making the values just slightly darker. Even if the reference does happen to make those values that bright, you can design your own image for better clarity. Hope this helps! Let me know if there is anything that I can clear up for you
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Tobias Degnebolig, I think these are some great 5 minute studies. One proportional issue that seems consistent in most of your drawings is that the heads are feeling just a tad bit too small in proportion to the body, so try to keep that in mind and make them slightly bigger in your future studies to match. Additionally, I think it feels a bit difficult to critique some of your pieces because it looks like the level of finish for some of your mannequins vary. I've attached an image that shows one of Proko's simpler mannequins (the on one the right) and I feel that's probably a good level to do your studies. Try not to focus on adding features for now, and just make sure that the major features (simplified rib cage, hips, limbs, and head) all feel very solid and well constructed. If you want a point of reference from what you've uploaded, I think the second mannequin is a good level of finish to go to. I think lastly, just watch out for some of the proportions for the limbs in your studies as well. Proportion is definitely one of the harder concepts to fully learn (just doing the drawing lay in for your figures will be challenging at all levels) so don't be too hard on yourself if you're not getting it right away. If there's anything about my critique that you need me to clear up, feel free to let me know so that I can expand on some of these concepts!
f6760e0ed81d7356004c1b9effc60c83
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
I think this is one of my favorite concepts in composition because it gives you a lot of freedom to experiment with a certain mood. Here's on I did a bit more recently where I did have a specific metaphor in mind...it isn't exactly subtle so I'll give bonus points if you can guess what it was haha
Zuriel Illustration (fin image adjusted)
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Definitely looking a lot more solid overall! It's awesome to see how many different critiques you've applied to your updated piece.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Luigi Manese
Hi @Emma, these are some great gesture drawing studies. I really like how you've abstracted the shapes of the torsos/limbs so to create more flow in your drawings. The actual gestures are pretty solid overall, so the only critique that I can think of would be to still keep an eye out for your proportions/structure in your figures. Namely, the two images I attached below, you can see some instances where the structure of the actual figure started to slip a little bit. It's a lot to juggle, especially when doing quick gestures, but try to keep this in mind as you continue to do these exercises because it'll only serve to help you once you start getting into longer and more finished poses. Hope this helps! And feel free to let me know if you have any questions
Emma
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message