Lucas Kremer
Omkar, Really solid effort here. Great value control you've really used the full range to turn those forms . There's not a lot to critique here, but I feel that maybe the overall egg effect of the head could be pushed by bring darkening the far side of the head. The forehead especially could roll more to create that volume. Additionally I would love to see more form in the beard. Some type of highlights to indicate activity there would add a lot. These are minor critiques. Really excellent job on the facial forms, the likeness is clear. Great work. Don't forget to sign it! It's worth putting your name on it. :)
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Lucas Kremer
Philipp, I feel that these types of in depth analytical approaches are vital for a period of time. Being able to push through and see the underlying forms, understand them, and then recreate them is a great way to understand what you're drawing. However at a certain point, drawing what you see directly can be just as effective. Eventually the information you've studied in this more in-depth way will come out naturally as you are drawing directly. You just wont be drawing it all out, it will stay in your mind, informing your mark-making. The patience it takes to do these types of studies is admirable, and keep doing them as long as they bring benefit and remain interesting, but don't neglect direct drawing as a way to test the knowledge that you are gaining from these studies. Long story short do both :) Keep up the good work, it will get you really far!
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Lucas Kremer
I agree with Kristian that some of the shadow/anatomy shapes could be clearer. That would make the light source read more immediately to the viewer, and would help the portrait sit in space more solidly. However, this has a lot of energy in it and is really playful, and I appreciate that a lot. Well done overall.
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Lucas Kremer
I love the portrait lay-in. Very clear light/shadow mapping. The core shadow on the upper leg is a little intense, as Alex mentioned. However once the shadow is filled in with value you can easily bring that back into balance with more value context. Great job, especially for an hour.
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Lucas Kremer
These Gestures have a lot of great movement. Really nice work overall. I especially enjoy your third page, you're getting some good flow and indication without getting fussy. Keep developing these!
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kataquarelle
The livestream was amazing! Thank you! This is just really rough and sketchy, without measuring much. It is just the beginning of a drawing for me. I will continue working on it because I love the reference image.
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Lucas Kremer
I would love to see it after more work is done. Right now you've got a solid start. The features seem well placed and it looks like you are mapping the shadow information nicely.. Keep going!
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Tariq Fahmy
Hey Proko team. this is the sketch i worked on, took me around 90 minutes. thoughts and critique?
sketch proko
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Lucas Kremer
Pen can be a challenging and unforgiving medium, so well done jumping in with this approach. Overall your proportions and placement of the features is pretty accurate. One thing that I did notice is that the ear feels like it's a little loo light, and could benefit from being pushed into the same value range as the surrounding area. This sometimes happens when we get focused on an area of higher detail, this can cause tunnel vision where we lose the value relationship to the whole image somewhat. Overall though good effort.
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Martin Krammer
Thanks a lot for the Stream, it was a lot of fun :) I’d be happy to hear some feedback.
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Lucas Kremer
Pretty solid effort here overall. You've done a nice job seeing the light/shadow pattern. I am noticing one key element though that is worth noticing though. Right now you've got the chin pushed back a little too far, If you use a straight line from the chin and measure up towards the eye, you can see this proportional shift. Something to notice moving forward, use those straight lines and angles to measure carefully!
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Lucas Kremer
Looks great. The linear description has clear overlaps and perspective, with simple explanations of forms, really good there. Your painting has good values and a clear light/shadow read, with organized and clean shapes. Cant ask much more from a study. Taking the proper time needed to truly work with the information is key. Slow studies are the only way to get faster. Nice work.
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Lucas Kremer
Really nice. Your value control makes the form read well and the fill/bounce light in the shadow adds come depth. Good work!
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Lucas Kremer
@Jesse Yao, This is something I'm quite familiar with, and have experienced through multiple cycles of training. This is just my perspective, so understand that this can apply to your path, but may not. Starting out was not about fun, it was about learning and growing in skill. Learning discipline and realizing that at times fun isn't what's important, getting better is. There is a lot of value in being able to sit down, whether you want to or not, and start drawing/painting or working on a skill. I would say that attitude is required to the process. Realizing that you want to get better, and making a plan. The issue that I ran into many times, and still do occasionally, is the idea that "Where I want to be isn't here" or "I'll be happy when..." and projecting your happiness/success into the future at the expense of your current experience. It's important to set goals and track your progression, but this can quickly become more important than the artwork you're doing right now. If you are physically/mentally exhausted, you are ignoring your natural rhythms and aren't listening to your body. You can do this a few times, but it's inherently unsustainable. If we want to take on a craft and have it be a lifelong endeavor, we have to embrace periods of rest. Set aside time to draw/paint. When you sit down to draw something you scheduled to work on, but the idea doesn't excite you that much, or worse yet, you're bored or uninterested in the subject altogether. Stop and ask yourself what would be fun to work on just because it feels good. You may not always get to indulge on a whim, but sometimes its really refreshing to do that. When I was heavily working on figure drawing from life, and was really just bored of the fundamentals of anatomy and figure drawing, switching to animals was enough of a fresh subject that I was able to keep drawing, but enjoy it much more. There a lot of truth in these phrases like "Do what you love". I can also say that the drawings/paintings that I create that are purely for personal enjoyment, almost always turn out better. I can engage with them for longer hours and because I'm having fun, they don't burn me out. Drawing for the sake of drawing is so vital to being able to sustain your skill over the long term. You need to be able to enjoy what your are doing somewhat to be able to actually work through the struggle of getting better. Learn to embrace the periods where you are struggling with improving, because eventually you will get better and move onto the next subject of interest. As @Irshad Karim posted, You may not burn out now, but it will come. Take time to reflect on why you are pushing yourself so hard, take time to rest and reset. Then come back at it from a new angle.
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Lucas Kremer
Christopher, I noticed no one had replied to this so I'll add my two cents. Loomis heads are a construction based approach of drawing the portrait. Using the fundamental perspective of a box you can add/remove sections to that box and begin to build a more complicated form like the head. If you are having trouble drawing a portrait, it's always good to start with a simpler form and work with that. I hope that gives some insight into what Stan mentioned, let me know if you have any more questions.
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quinnthomson
Robo bean practice! Once again these are a bit rough - what do you think are some improvements I could make?
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Lucas Kremer
These look great. You captured the perspective and overlaps of the forms stacking in space, but you maintained the gesture and flow. Really solid.
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quinnthomson
3D animals and shapes! Unfortunately, I can’t seem to find the reference images I used atm, but I’ll post them here as well if they show up!
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Lucas Kremer
@quinnthomson Quinn, Overall these look great, your simple forms are sitting in space well and have a clear perspective. In regards to your animal simplifications I feel you've done really well extracting forms out of the reference. It can be difficult seeing through the anatomy and patterns/fur. Nice work. Are you wanting to continue working on animals? A challenging exercise can be to extract these simple forms from reference, and then taking those forms, and using them to draw the same simplified animal from a different angle. It pushes the imagination quite far! Well done on these, keep at it!
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Lien Hoa
Hello @Stan Prokopenko, hello everyone@Stan Prokopenko, I'm practicing drawing cubes and cylinders from life and I start to feel comfortable drawing them. But when I try to imagine a box and draw it, it just doesn't feel right so I'm not ready to move on the next assignment (animal construction). Right now I'm looking for ways to practice drawing boxes (specifically, on a website called drawabox) but it really takes a lot of time. Regarding this 'self-learning art online' topic, can anyone give me some advice: should i hone one basic skill really well and then move on, or just tackle everything to have an overall view and then come back at what i'm weak late??. (I'm a perfectionist therefore my progress is very slow...)
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Lucas Kremer
Hello! @Lien Hoa I'm new to Proko, but wanted to jump in to give what advice/recommendations I can. In my opinion, successfully drawing a box in perspective is such a fundamental aspect of drawing that it is worth while to stick with it until you develop a good understanding and can repeatedly work with that simple form. This will feed back into everything you are drawing. So, even though it may feel tedious at times, or less exciting than drawing animals or complex anatomy, we can never escape the fundamentals of perspective, and so it will always be relevant. I don't know where you are in your development, but I can say from my own experience that honing one subject or topic is very valuable. Whether you are drawing figures in complex action poses, or designing cars or spaceships, all of those complex forms can be put inside a "bounding box" which contains the objects perspective. You can see many skilled artists do this to assist in their process. I will often sit and draw perspective boxes, and then cut off sections of them or add on another simple form as a warm up. Its a great way to practice and get your mind thinking in perspective. With that said, if you find that it begins to bore you, use as a simple warmup for 10-20minutes and then move onto another subject that's more exciting/challenging. Boxes in and of themselves are not very interesting. If you stick with fundamental perspective for a while you will find that it begins to inform your other drawings naturally, and moving onto more complex subjects will feel more approachable. If you have any questions let me know and I will assist in whatever way I can.
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