Jme
Jme
Earth
Jme
I've been getting frustrated with how often I have to erase and redraw a panel trying to figure out how to get it to look right, but seeing that even David has to go through this process sometimes makes me feel a lot better, heh.
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Jme
11d
Inktober Days 1-5. Critiques welcome. I know my linework, anatomy, and perspective are a bit wonky.
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inktoberday5
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Jme
Asked for help
Page layout and design is new to me, got some questions around things like: - where the horizon line falls in each panel on a single page - the mix of shots used in panels for a single page - when and when not to repeat information within multiple panels Am very confident with writing but translating writing skills to the types of skills that are unique to comic stories is proving challenging. Are there some common faux pas or things that good comic artists should typically try to avoid when it comes to page layout? More specifically, in my early storyboards I find myself worrying about things like: - Is it OK to have ~2 panels on a page (especially consecutively) where the horizon line is the same height, or the height of the horizon line hasn't differed significantly between the two panels? - What to avoid when using the same types of shots for ~2+ panels on a page? i.e. Establishing/long shot > med > med > med > closeup? My initial thought is that this is fine so long as the angle of each shot differs in a meaningful way, but in practice I'm skeptical that there are lots of pitfalls here that can make the end result boring or off. - What to avoid when using panels to establish setting, i.e. after the initial establishing shot, tips and tricks for revealing more of the setting and environment in a way that's interesting and meaningful prior to introducing characters.  - Using the same perspective multiple panels in a row , i.e 2pt perspective several times in a row on the same page, and so on. Possibly overthinking a lot of this, but any general advice or things to avoid in terms of page layout would be appreciated.
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Jme
added a new topic
Page layout faux pas
1mo
Page layout and design is new to me, looking to get some insight.
Jme
I have a question about figures intersecting the sides of panels. David's description makes sense, but I've also seen super close-ups that essentially cut off one half of the character's face using the top and side of the panel. Things like that. What's an effective way to do this without it looking odd in the way the video describes?
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Jme
I've been looking forward to this course, I always learn something when I watch any of David's videos.
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Jme
Hey Uncomfortable, it's me, one of your fledging DaB students. My question is, how do you "know" when you have reached the intangible threshold of "good enough" to start using a platform and trying to build a following? Too soon, and I'd imagine you do more damage to your potential career than good, but given that it's incredibly hard to judge your own art (or maybe if you can't, that's an indicator that you're not ready to start throwing it up on instagram or wherever), and especially if you're always in a space where you feel like other people on those platforms are always "better", how and when do you take the risk? Side note: I'm finally getting to the end of DaB and you throw this new Science of Drawing Course up, thanks for nothing...there is no finish line. Looking forward to it.
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Anko.
Followed along with proko doing beans... compared to his mine feels a little off... like they are longer in a way idk... some help will be appreciated <3
b
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Jme
4mo
I think you've got the gist of it; once you become more comfortable, try to loosen up your hand and your lines (you want loose, confident strokes that are intentional); I think that's why you're feeling that yours look somehow different from Proko's. For the actual goal of the exercise, however, it seems you're establishing a solid foundation (a couple may be a little long, as someone else said, but you're still capturing the motion correctly).
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James Doane
Cool idea! As far as masters, I always liked Rembrandt. I do a lot of digital portraits, and I really like Aaron Griffin’s  work (aarongriffinart on IG) and Ivana Besevic (ivanabesevic.studio on IG), but there are a lot of others. I also really like the painting style of Solomon Omogboye (solomon_omogboye_studio on IG). Kevin Beilfuss (kevinbeilfussart on IG) does very cool figure paintings.  I’ll add more as I think of them… there are a LOT of great artists out there!
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Jme
5mo
Wow, these are all great!
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Jme
Nobody knows everybody, would be great to share favorites around -- and maybe gain new favorites as a result ("favorite artist" either in terms of aspirations, art mentors, artists you do your master studies from, anything really). Couple of my favorites: - Grace Liu (https://nargyle.tumblr.com) - Elle Power (https://twitter.com/EllePowerr, mostly known for her art/animation on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9Q3i5w6-Ug)
Jme
Interesting, thanks for sharing
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Serena Marenco
So, the number of people working on a comic depends on editorial requirements: if you look at American comics there are people assigned to each step because of the processing times but as far as webcomics are concerned there are usually no more than one or two people working on them (in the case where one writes and the other draws). Generally though, when it comes to webcomics it's more a matter of 'we're friends and we want to do this thing together'. In some cases, when a webcomic author achieves enough success and earns enough money, it happens that he hires an assistant to help him with the colouring so that he can publish more weekly episodes (this is the case of the author of the webcomic Wild Life, which I have been following for years). In publishing, on the other hand, in extreme cases you have one person who takes care of the subject, one who writes the script, one artist who only takes care of the pencils, one who inks, one who colours, one who types (sometimes a specific person for noises), after that layout artists, graphic artists, profreaders, etc. But this is because it is necessary to bring out a complete chapter every month. In the case of a webcomic, you decide the pace: you can decide to start by going out with just one page a week (usually everyone starts that way, as you have no way of knowing if you'll have enough readers to afford more effort) but also more, depending on how long you need to finish a full page. In the beginning, however, I recommend that you only publish one page and keep the extra ones to cover unforeseen events; you may get sick, your computer may break down, you may simply not have the right inspiration to work one day or lose more time than expected on a scene. In this way you will work with less stress, not having to have your days numbered to publish the page without missing the day of release. Also take into account that you will have to dedicate a few hours each day to managing your social profiles and the platforms where you decide to publish (it is better not to do this in one place and not to sign exclusives with any platform).
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Jme
5mo
Thanks, this was all interesting to read about.
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Jme
Browser: Opera, Chrome (latest ver as of 5/24/21) Repro rate: 100% Repro steps: 1. User 1 create topic in Community forum 2. User 2 respond with comment on User 1's topic 3. User 2 delete comment 4. User 1 view notifications after User 2 deletes comment User 1 receives notification that User 2 commented on User 1's topic even if comment is deleted before User 1 views notifications. Clicking on notification does not handle gracefully; User 1 is taken to blank page with infinite loading screen and pop-up error indicating comment has been deleted. Expected behavior: User 1 is returned to topic and is able to view topic/comments, as well as pop-up error indicating deleted comment, rather than being returned to a blank loading page. Example: https://www.proko.com/community/topics/how-can-you-tell-when-you-ve-mastered-the-basics-enough-to-move-on#37622337462471261.66108840961971261.62624831819881261
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Gannon Beck
It takes an army for the big publishers because comics take a lot of time. About the only way most comics would come out on a monthly schedule is to use an assembly line process. There are plenty of people who do comics on their own. Jeff Smith, Terry Moore, Faith Erin Hicks, and Daniel Warren Johnson are just a few recent examples, but I'm sure there are tons more. The challenge is going to be production schedule if you have to do something else for money or otherwise have significant time commitments elsewhere. Instead of a page a day, you might only be able to do a page or two a week. A page a week gets you 52 pages a year, which isn't bad for a side project. My recommendation, if you have never done a comic before, is to start out with short stories--anywhere from one to eight pages. This will give you some room to experiment with processes and tools. You don't want to get 15 pages into your big project only to realize you need to redo them because you figured out a better style. To bring up the subject of your previous topic on when to know you're ready--when it comes to comics, I think people get it backwards. Do comics to learn to draw, not the other way around. Wrestling with a comic book script will throw so many problems at you that you have to solve, that in the process of solving them, you will continue to level up, putting more and more tools in your toolbox the whole way. It will also give context to the things you are learning here. I hope you give it a shot. Comics are a great medium.
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Jme
5mo
Great food for thought, thank you.
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Demetrio Cran
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Jme
5mo
They do! Thanks very much.
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Yiming Wu
You can absolutely do it on your own.... check out this gal: http://www.sssscomic.com, this is a one-person comic and its already 2000+ pages long... i started following it in 2017, looks like she's still going strong, with beautiful pages and 4 updates per week. she had a 700 page one completed before started this one even... the problem is your time and maybe job... as a student i got school work to do that's not remotely related to art, i'm not sure if I'd also have time when i came out of it :( And also your workflow matters... I can craft out a spread in like 4 days in the style i like but that's not doing anything else, and that surely isn't fast enough for publishers. If you are just doing it for yourself, then i don't think there's anything stopping you. My take is just to look after your eyes.
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Jme
5mo
This was inspiring, thank you.
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Gannon Beck
There is really a yin and a yang to all this. The answer for me is that you're never really done studying the fundamentals, but that shouldn't stop you from making the best art you can. Andrew Loomis talked about setting aside one day for study, and I know Norman Rockwell took classes all his life. I think they recognized that mastery is illusive, and there is always a deeper understanding one can achieve. That said, I think there can be a tendency to put off tackling big art projects because we don't feel ready. That's paralysis of analysis. People who do nothing but exercises, but no finished art fall into this trap. Sure, it might not be perfect, but so what? Dive in. If it doesn't turn out great, then it was just a draft. Furthermore, great art can survive mistakes. We're living in a media culture largely built on the shoulders of Jack Kirby comics with all of their made up anatomy. Art doesn't have to be perfect to be good.
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Jme
5mo
Paralysis of analysis is definitely the phrase of the day. Heh
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galacticnine
I think sometimes, if you've spent time practicing the basics, it might be a good idea to try moving on even if you don't feel you're completely "ready". After all, no one's ever 100% ready, and you can always go back to review the basics if you feel out of your depth! Even with anatomy and more advanced topics, they're something you'll likely go back to again and again to refresh yourself, or understand something you never got the first time. Challenging yourself is a good way to continue to grow, and I find that learning new info often improves my understanding of the basics as well.
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Jme
5mo
Agreed, just hard to be a good judge of that as the student, I think. I saw Mattesi critiquing some Force drawings and indicating that a couple of the artists should square up their fundamentals a lot more before attempting the force series, so just tough to know where the line is there.
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Jme
5mo
When you look at full length comic books/series, manga, or similar, it seems that in addition to the actual author or creator of the work, there is always an army of people behind them to actually produce the work, long before the publishing process even starts. Assistant artists for certain pages or frames, inkers who go over the original creator's rough or penciled sketches, colorists, artists who specialize in things the creator does not such as environment (since few artists are masters of all...seems comic artists either need to master "everything" or have others contributing to the work) etc. I was hoping someone could point me to some kind of successful series of comics (not quick draw webcomics, like full length detailed comics) or otherwise that were produced by a single creator (excluding the publishing process). Or is the stuff I described above part of the publishing process, and the original creator typically will just submit rough drafts of the art and writing? As someone who does not have an army of people working with me, I would still like to eventually create my own series for submission to publication, but it's pretty discouraging when I see so many examples of that not being possible with only a single person behind the work :)
Jme
Advice from the streams on the site, etc, encourage students to get their fundamental drawing skills solid before moving on to courses like anatomy or composition, or to go back to basics if they start pursuing the more advanced classes to soon. How do you know when you've got a firm enough grasp of the fundamentals to start pursuing that? Simply going through the fundamentals course doesn't automatically mean you've been able to apply the concepts well enough to continue or not.