Jonas Gezels
Jonas Gezels
Earth
Jonas Gezels
day 2 eyes
Untitled 1
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Jonas Gezels
does this count as spider?
the small enemy girlfriend enenenennennenennneeeeeeeeenenenenenennene
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Jonas Gezels
1mo
I'm working on a portrait piece for a friend's DND character but I'm getting stuck on it not knowing how to finish it. also some feedback on in in general is helpful (just don't yell at me okay)
jakob test
Jonas Gezels
I did a real quick draw over but I feel like your lacking 3d or are struggling with them, everything feels very flat try to think you are going over someones are like if you were to run a pen over your friends arm. doing some basic cylinder studies will help greatly to make you think more in 3d space. just keep on going and never be hard on yourself
crit
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Jonas Gezels
I'm lowkey expecting to get absolutly bodied and slammed but oh well here's mine
warrior
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Izak van Langevelde
Let's distinguish between the geographical horizon line and geometrical horizon line. The geographical horizon is there because earth is a sphere, it is where sky and land meet. The geometrical horizon line exists because our eyes and cameras are projection devices, and it is where all vanishing points are located for our viewing direction. If we are looking horizontally (no pun intended), this geographical horizon is at eye level. Each direction has its own vanishing point, so a complex object with many directions, like an isokaeder, has many vanishing points.
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Jonas Gezels
okay I think I get it, and when for example a birds eye view you got the geometrical an dgeographical being split to the extreme causing 3 point perspective? right?
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Liandro
Hey @Jonas Gezels! Looks like all your questions orbit the core of perspective basics - Vanishing points and horizon line/eye level are the most crucial concepts to undserstand perspective. I think it's great that you're having these doubts, it means you're in the middle of the learning process. I'll try to answer your questions as objectively as possible, although what I think will really help you is that you spend some more time studying these subjects until you feel them making more sense in your mind and in your drawings. . Yes, "horizon" and "eye level" roughly refer to the same thing - it's the height from where the viewer views the scene. An image in perspective (be it a drawing, a painting, a photo etc.) is always an image that represents a specific point of view - it's like where seeing the scene through someone's eyes. If this someone is a person standing up on the ground and staring straight ahead, we'll get a perspective that is close to the ordinary human experience of sight in daily life; but if the person goes up or down (ducks on the ground, flies on a hang-glider... or whatever), their eye level (a.k.a. the horizon of their perspective) will change accordingly. . Can objects in the same drawing have different horizon lines? No! For each scene in perspective, there's always only 1 horizon. I like to think of the horizon not as something "out there", but as a property of the viewer's eye. Also, rather than a line, I prefer imagining the horizon as an imaginary plane that crosses the viewer's eye level and divides what he sees into upward and downward, as illustrated by Phil Metzger in this first image I attached. (The words in Spanish read: nível de vision = "eye level"; "this part of the tree is above eye level"; "this part of the tree is below eye level"). . And is it possible for objects to have different vanishing points than others? Yes, totally! In a scene in perspective, the horizon is just one, but the vanishing points can be multiple! Actually, it's more common that each object will have their own set of vanishing points (rather than all objects in the scene follow the same points all the time). A simple way to think of it is like this: if two different objects are aligned in the scene, they will have the same vanishing points; but whenever they're unaligned, each one will have their own set of different vanishing points (see second image attached). Now imagine a scene with several unaligned objects and you'll see that the amount of vanishing points in a scene is pretty much unlimited! Finally, I have to recommend two of the best perspective resources I know of today: - CtrlPaint's Perspective sketching series: https://ctrlpaint.myshopify.com/collections/foundation-skills/products/perspective-sketching-1-the-basics - Marshall Vandruff's 1994 perspective series: http://marshallart.com/SHOP/all-products/all-videos/1994-perspective-drawing-series/ Hope this helps! Let me know in case you have other questions. Best regards o/
Captura de Tela 2021 08 28 às 17.11.28
Captura de Tela 2021 08 28 às 17.18.05
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Jonas Gezels
wow thanks for the in depth reply, I have the book of scott robertson but it's very very techincal for me to understand and my head doesn't enjoy that stuff.
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Jonas Gezels
I'm currently digging in perspective again as I feel like I don't appy these things really in my work, what I find the most hard to get is how vanishing points work and the horizon line and eye line, are the horizon line the same as the eye? the drawabox says that they most of the time line up. also can objects in the same drawing have a different horizon line or do they all follow the same one? is it possible for object to have different vanishing points then others or do they all follow the same one?
Steve Lenze
Hey Jonas, Adding shadows from imagination is pretty hard. The best way to do it is to pick a light direction and intensity. Then just use logic to place your shadows, and how dark they should be. Also, you have some proportional issues that I addressed in a draw over. I hope you find it helpful :)
ears
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Jonas Gezels
I tried to apply your feedback to the piece, I'm getting a bit fed up with it and well it still is pretty dogass
ballandweep
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Jonas Gezels
wow thanks a bunch I'll try to apply it
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Vincentius Sesarius
I don't think you should rush yourself just because it's a collaboration with some other artists. Being honest to your collaboration partner is the key to any successful and long lasting collaboration. It seems to me that you still have no clear direction into what the concept of the artwork is going to be. Because the reason of you having difficulty in shading is not that you can't shade, but rather you still haven't grasped what you're shading. Take the time to clear out the idea of the concept first, because that's the heavy part. After you've done that, you probably will have easier time to finish the artwork.
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Jonas Gezels
I have the tendency to drop projects once it doesn't go the way I hope it goes so by in the hope to rush it I'll get it at least done. and it's more like a challenge then a collab, it isn't something personal with the artist I feel but nonetheless, I'll try to do some brainstorming on where I wanna go in the hope I don't get frustrated and trash it
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Jonas Gezels
Hello I'm working on this collab going on of mako VICE (https://www.instagram.com/p/CRg5bgtDSBu/) everything went pretty alright untill I got to the shading, I also could use some general feedback , I added my reference board to it as well if that helps. I am hoping to have this finished today as I wish to post it tomorrow online thanks for your time
s
unknown
Serena Marenco
Hi Jonas! If you are just starting out, I would advise against working on a single level. There is no single way to colour digitally, practically every digital artist develops their own method over time, but I'll try to explain a very simple one to you, to start with. Start by drawing the figure on a separate layer (below the drawing layer) apply flat colours (no shadows!). Try to be as accurate as possible with the borders because if you decide not to keep the drawing layer, you will need well-defined margins. Above this layer insert a layer set to linear multiply or burn, here, using a neutral colour (a light grey, usually, but you can play with the colour temperature) you will paint the shadows. They can be flat like in a cartoon or more realistic, this depends on what you want to achieve. On a subsequent layer set to soft light you will outline the lights. After that you can add a new layer with details (e.g. single strands of hair). This is the most basic way, there are many others. You can also insert textures, more layers of light and shadow, gradients, etc. but to get familiar with the process this is a good method.
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Jonas Gezels
thanks for the explenation, I put a screenshot on how my layers work where I already kinda follow your first paragraph tho I used color on the multipy layer and not grey
Screenshot 1
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Sonja Müller
That is a really good base I think. I find the motive and the angle really interesting. To be able to give best advice it would maybe help it you could post a drawing with a style you were going for. Should it be more lose and painterly? Or do you want a Manga/Comic style? If you wnat to go painterly, I would recommend just work further into shadow and light. That would also mean look up references how these behave on different textures (skin, cloth, hair, blood, metal). I think when you work through that it will already lookmuch more polished.
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Jonas Gezels
I really like the loose painterly style as I feel its more free since I really hate being very precise
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Mengu Gungor
Looks good so far, looks like you have your ideas down. You now probably just need reference, and keep painting. I threw together a few ideas for you without knowing exactly what you have in mind as an example. I'd suggest creating a board like this, be sure to include a few images for mood, color, style, etc from artists you like. These references will inform your painting. Feel free to modify them right on your board as needed (I did that for the crop top). And you may want a few refs for lighting as well, so you can have an idea of the light/shadow contrast you want for rendering. Hope this helps ^_^
BlindfoldGirlRefs
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Jonas Gezels
oh thanks a lot for the refs, I mostly use refs as I go, like when I was working on the blindfold I searched for a ref cause most of the time I don't know where it'll go.
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Jonas Gezels
I have been having issues with digital in general but now and then I attempt to make something decent where I can be proud of and as a way of getting into it. However I hit a wall after adding the main colors and don't really know how to progress on it as it varies a lot with other artists. If you have the time please give me some feedback and thanks for doing so
flagellant ganger
Irshad Karim
Feedback is useful at a number of stages - not just when you're done. Once a piece is done, it's done. Any feedback you receive on it can be used on the next piece, but this one's over. Lots of people seek feedback when they're at a crossroads and aren't sure which direction to take. Plenty of people post WIPs (works in progress) when they aren't sure about something specific. I think when posting unfinished work for feedback, the best things to consider are what specific issue would you like the feedback to address, and simply whether you yourself put a good deal of time into working through your issue on your own first. For the first one, "I don't know where to take this piece" is vague, but certainly still an issue worthy of feedback. If you can offer people something specific to focus on however, that is certainly going to make things easier on the one offering their time. That last one is subjective, but some people have a habit of valuing their time in this context a little too highly, and actively seek feedback early and often as a way to minimize their own time investment. As long as you feel you've made an attempt to think through whatever it is you want help with, then there is nothing wrong with asking for help. Worst case scenario, let's say you post something for feedback and you receive none - that doesn't mean posting your work was somehow wrong, a mistake, or inappropriate. It simply means no one had the time to offer in that instance. No harm done. Ultimately just remember that posting your work for feedback is not a performance. No one is looking for you to meet some standard or to please their sensibilities. They're giving feedback ideally because they want to help people grow. That's all. It's easy to forget that sometimes amidst the eternal pursuit of validation social media engagement.
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Jonas Gezels
Thanks a lot for your reply, when it comes to meeting a standard I have this fear that was put into me during school cause of fear of failure and looking like the dumbass it's pretty hard for me to put that aside as I am in cosntant fear of ridicule.
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Jonas Gezels
I went back to my more looser way of gesture drawing and also watched the proko landmarks video again as it has been a few years since I've seen it
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20210618 123622
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Jonas Gezels
I've been wondering this for a while now, I got quite a few unfinished digital paintings where I feel like it's not really worth it to post online due it being unfinished and I'm simply stuck on how to progress on it. I want to ask for feedback on it but cause it's an piece I'll probably never finish I feel like it isn't really usefull to anyone to really give feedback on it as it'll be a waste of time to whoever does so. would it be best to just post it, see what feedback I get anyway or just try and fix it on my own without bothering others?
Jonas Gezels
man this is an amazing piece and a great illustration !
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Jonas Gezels
continuastion, focused more on my line control and placing landmarks, these are all 1 min I didn't do much cause I wasn't really enjoying myself as they all looked like shit
aio
ain
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