Octavivs
Octavivs
Earth
persona937
hi, i would like some feedback. thanks!
exaggerated pose final
exaggerated pose
Sekaa062
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Octavivs
    You don’t need to exaggerate an exaggeration that much for it to fulfill its purpose (being it to help you understand the form and gesture simultaneously / creative freedom from the literal model). Your exaggeration is probably taking it too far.  Another point of exaggeration is typically to make the weight clearer. So, your exaggeration has taken one of the major c curve gesture (Head to right leg) and just compressed it without properly compensating the rest of the gesture for the weight change. I do see that her leg is further bent, but that’s not enough (I don’t mean bend the leg more. I mean feel out the balance by trying other things as well) . She looks more like she should be balancing on her right foot while her left is in the air. I’ve attached my solutions (without robo-bean).
4
5
Reply
Octavivs
Submission and images used
45
Proko Reference Bash 09
Proko Reference Bash 20
Proko Reference Bash 15
Proko Reference Bash 05
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Mcfat 10
How exactly do you work the robo-bean if the person is raising one clavicle?
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Octavivs
You change the robo bean to make it make sense to you. Assign a landmark to a particular point of the torso box then build the rest from there. Personally I would just change the robo-bean to a form that makes the gesture read well (i.e. adding some kind of triangular prism for the shoulders or what I did below and make the torso box malleable). The shoulder/neck area is a particularly complex area that will keep making you rethink how to tackle it so good luck.
3
Reply
Adam Gilsdorf
Can someone please please explain to me the difference between the “angle of the ellipse” and the “long axis?” I have spent weeks trying to figure out the ellipse/bucket and every time I think I have a breakthrough I end up confusing myself and even more. It’s the ellipse I have the most trouble with. I have watched and re watched multiple times the anatomy, how to draw, and critique videos in this section and am stuck and getting frustrated. Somehow the way Stan explains the lines in the first critique video just does not click. Can someone please explain the process of drawing the ellipse (especially at angles/tilts that are not perfectly horizontal or vertical)? Diagrams greatly appreciated. I would upload pics of my attempts but they are so scattered and confused at this point that I don’t think it will help. Please explain as if talking to a seven year old and I will be forever grateful!
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Octavivs
Your answer lies in intuitively understanding perspective and more specifically how to put an ellipse into a quadrilateral that is in perspective (and then even more specifically so extending the aforementioned ellipse into a cylinder). If you are having frustration with the simplified pelvis I have strong feeling you don't have a knowledgeable grasp on perspective yet. Go to Marshall Vandruff's website. He has a perspective course for 12 dollars. About two thirds of the way into the second lecture on ellipses he should answer your particular question. I know I say to spend money to answer this answer, but his series on perspective will be pretty much every bit of information you will ever need on perspective. He explains this answer and perspective questions way better than anyone will be able to in this forum. I cannot recommend it enough.
Reply
Octavivs
The rib cage is mostly straight in this one. Most of the twisting (therefore pinching) appearance is coming from his left arm being brought slightly to his back (posteriorly rotated) and his right arm being brought forward (anteriorly rotated). I think your issue with understanding the direction of the rib cage comes from the fact that the rib cage’s opening for the head is not parallel with the rhythm of the whole cage. The whole anatomical rib cage’s rhythm itself is kind of “laying back”, and the torso in total is more vertical. The opening of the head is more forward (3). I’ve drawn (or how I understand / would think if I were to do a study) this pose’s rib cage (1), the angle of the torso as a box (2), and as the bean (4). As you can see, the rib cage does not seem to follow the rhythm of the torso. This is probably where your confusion comes from.
2
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Christopher
I apologize for the bad lighting! These are my first attempts at the bean method. You can see I started out stiff on the Tilt portion, but then loosened up. These were done in step with the video so they are a little messy in line quality. I struggled with the twisting. Do my drawings exemplify the previous lesson on gesture? Or did I fail to show it? Let me know your thoughts! Thank you!
IMG 0363
IMG 0364
IMG 0365
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Octavivs
I do agree that you loosened up as you went through the drawings, but I don’t think you loosened up enough. I suggest that you draw larger (and do some the entire size of the page). This will force you to loosen up even more as long as you go quickly.  I think your struggle with twisting stems mostly from your lack of practice with perspective because you’re inherently adding more of the z axis, which means you have to think in both three dimensions and about gesture (which is difficult). The same goes for your foreshadowing. In some of the beans it’s quite difficult to tell how the beans are oriented. I’d say don’t worry about perspective for right this instant, that’s a different beast you need to tackle.  I suggest that you do more beans not in time with the video: take your time. Do some studies of Stan’s drawings themselves completely detached from the models. Then try more beans using the models, but don’t focus on accuracy of the models but on the accuracy of the marks you’ve got down (AKA make good bean drawings even if it’s not technically correct according to the image).
Reply
Octavivs
I don’t believe Marshall actually goes into drawing a “perfect” cube with no distortion in his lectures; although, he does give all the information you will ever need in terms of perspective. If you wish to understand “perfect” perspective Dan Beardshaw has two good videos outlining exactly that. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RsbzCHLsQuQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGAURGTV3v0     These videos probably have too much information though, but that’s kind of the point. Don’t worry about being perfect with your cubes; or simply put, stop drawing like an engineer as soon as you can. Your goal is to be able to see cubes (really anything you want to draw) as a 3D model in your head. So draw from life if it helps you see the 3d model while drawing or draw with perspective lines to help you see the 3d model while drawing, and draw from imagination with no help and then see if it’s correct. That should help you see the 3d model while drawing.     Your ultimate goal is to think entirely in 3d and completely forget you’re drawing on a two dimensional surface. That’s why you learn the cube.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
imnate
Asked for help
Here’s day 11 on gesture drawing what are your thoughts on them? And i ready to try my hands on the beans yet?
046B698A F1C6 48C9 9E5B F70B16971DAE
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Octavivs
I would like to express the view on drawing fundamentals that  they are tools to help you achieve what you ultimately want. I say that in referring to whether or not you should move on to the bean. The bean imo is far more simple than doing a gesture of an entire person, however, it is less explanatory. It’ll help you think in the most basic aspects of three dimensional form while maintaining the simplicity of gesture.      I would suggest going back and forth between the two concepts trying to add what you learn from each to the other. This is what you should always do, especially as you get more complicated with the concepts you practice.  You could always try to do the bean for the torso only and a lined gesture for the limbs and head. Practice to make each concept make sense to you. Think how it could help achieve your goals, even if it’s as simple as making your lines have the same quality as someone’s work you admire. Don’t move on arbitrarily.
Reply
Tom McLean
Really struggling creating characters and drawing in general, so I'm going back over some stuff to try and improve. I think maybe Its my torsos and heads that don't work structurally. Any help really appreciated, especially if its any process stuff/good habits I could be missing!
Untitled 1
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Octavivs
Personally I think that you don’t have a structural problem at all. At least not after looking at your work on instagram and from these sketches. Your drawings are excellent in terms of appealing shapes. But from these sketches, it may feel as though you aren’t acting with your drawings.     Each drawing seems to be effectively perfect in terms of basic structure. And your lines and shape are appealing, however where you may possibly be lacking is feeling the determination of the character committing the action, even if it’s a simple action like looking where they’re going or will be. The movie Klaus may be helpful to breakdown especially since it seems to fit your art stylistically.      Honestly I don’t think any of your struggling seems to be structural, but maybe something more higher order like acting or story. This is the best I can gather from your work and from the sole term “struggling” to describe your goal.
Reply
Sasank Gokaraju
even though I practice a lot , I do not post much . Here is my latest set of 1 min gestures. Appreciate some feedback !!
lifedrawing practice
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Octavivs
If these are all one minute gestures I think you’ve done fantastic work of explaining the literal gesture whilst using appealing lines. Because you’ve posted for quick gesture drawings and nothing more robust, I will only say that for the next many drawings you do you should focus on weight and balance. Some of the drawings here look a little off balance and although the actions look correct (being that I recognize these gestures), there’s only some umph to the actions in a couple of the drawings. Try doing studies of Diego lucia’s gestures (insta: @diluc). All in all, good quality drawings you’ve done.
Reply
Octavivs
I highly suggest that you keep the mannequinization to a very simple model. No joints. No hands. No feet. From what I can see, you cannot see in three dimensions too well yet. Your shapes don’t feel like volumes much at all. I do see a small bit of volumetric structure in the torso but only the beginnings. I suggest using a model sort of like the one I’ve added below. In general, try to simplify the subject as far as you can to effectively see a 3d model of it in your head and then add more specifics from there. In regards to gesture try to see a 3d model of the figure in your head then draw the gesture based on that; however, it is a gesture drawing after all so keep it loose.  P.S. Never substitute any rectangle or rectangular prism for an elliptical surface or volume unless you can already fit the ellipses in its respective rectangular counter part without frustration. You’re not helping yourself create believable three dimensional volumes in the long term.
1
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message