Văn Hiếu Võ
Văn Hiếu Võ
Earth
Văn Hiếu Võ
Here's a PDF with all the perspective notes I collected. These cover 1-point, 2-point, 3-point, cylindrical ("4-point"), hemispherical ("5-point"), spherical ("6-point") perspective, with reflections and shadows too. These are just notes, not a well written book, so pardon the shoddy presentation. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gYdbx6hebAVjoahw78pCrMLAnJ3hMc7L/view?usp=sharing
Văn Hiếu Võ
Here are my submissions for the beans and Skelly. Couldn't find the model photos.
20210806 173431@0.25x
SkellyPose1@0.5x
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Văn Hiếu Võ
I'm still not entirely sure about how the clavicular portion of the pecs should react to the pose of the arms, and the precise location of the pubis to draw the 40 ounce correctly. I'd appreciate if you can help me with those problems.
20210802 222758@0.25x
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Văn Hiếu Võ
Here's my breast submission.
20210731 143917@0.25x
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Adam Gilsdorf
Can someone please please explain to me the difference between the “angle of the ellipse” and the “long axis?” I have spent weeks trying to figure out the ellipse/bucket and every time I think I have a breakthrough I end up confusing myself and even more. It’s the ellipse I have the most trouble with. I have watched and re watched multiple times the anatomy, how to draw, and critique videos in this section and am stuck and getting frustrated. Somehow the way Stan explains the lines in the first critique video just does not click. Can someone please explain the process of drawing the ellipse (especially at angles/tilts that are not perfectly horizontal or vertical)? Diagrams greatly appreciated. I would upload pics of my attempts but they are so scattered and confused at this point that I don’t think it will help. Please explain as if talking to a seven year old and I will be forever grateful!
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Văn Hiếu Võ
I think Stan's terminology could use some work. The way he describes the "long axis", "this axis", etc. could be confusing. What he dubs "the long axis" is the NORMAL of the ellipse. Imagine a pencil, placed upright on the eraser end, on the surface of your desk. The pencil then represents the NORMAL of your desk's plane. The "angle of the ellipse" is its MAJOR AXIS. Google it, and you'll know that the longest dimension of an ellipse is called its MAJOR AXIS. Now, from Stan's demonstrations, there's a possibility that you might get confused between the ellipse that is the actual cap of the bucket (let's called this EA), and the ellipse that is its REPRESENTATION IN PERSPECTIVE (let's called this EB). EB is only an approximation of EA at a particular angle of view, it is never truly accurate. Stan noted that he simplifies by making the NORMAL of EA PERPENDICULAR to the MAJOR AXIS of EB. The NORMAL of EA represents the forward tilt of the bucket, while the MAJOR AXIS of EB tells you how long you should draw EB and how you should orient EB. It is an okay simplification because the point of the lesson isn't to get too deep in the weeds of perspective, but since it's only a simplification, you may find it doesn't work well when you're tracing screenshots of the 3D bucket model. Just keep that in mind, it's only a simplification, and hardly a accurate one. Here's a simple illustration. The NORMAL is in red, and the MAJOR AXIS is in blue. In the most frontal view, the NORMAL is just a vertical line. As you orbit around the bucket, its tilt is increasingly apparent. The MAJOR AXIS is always perpendicular to the NORMAL, and it helps you orient the caps of the bucket and know their length.
Illustration
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Văn Hiếu Võ
Haven't checked later lessons so I'm not sure if there are more muscles underneath the pecs, but hopefully I'm not too far off.
Pecs Assignment 01@0.5x
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Văn Hiếu Võ
Shoulder bones are really tough to figure out! With all the muscles around them.
DSC 0138@0.25x
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Văn Hiếu Võ
It was quite troublesome, but I hope I'm getting close to figuring out how to get the ribcage right.
DSC 0134@0.25x
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Văn Hiếu Võ
I'm not trying to blame the 3D models, but I think part of the reason why that person was confused about the size along different rotations is because Sketchfab model viewer is kind of crappy. I've recently found out that the rotation pivot shifts depending on your zoom level, and there's this weird restriction that blocks you from rotating the model all around. The only model that I have no problem with is the one hosted on p3d.in (particularly, this one https://www.proko.com/course-lesson/3d-model-wireframe-bucket-with-pelvis/notes) I think you should just host all your models on this website, because it has this super-useful X-ray mode, and of course, wireframe mode, both of which allows you to see through the model and figure out what's going on behind all the forms. Sketchfab's model viewer is infuriatingly limited in this regard.
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Rowsoferra
Hello I just wanted to post a question not a critique :) Between 1:18 - 3:55 he talks about the process for finding the first ellipse, and it all makes sense to me until I did it with this pose, a straight on pov. I get the perspective enough to know I should draw it something like position 1, but for that to happen the perpendicular line of the long axis, and the side-to-side line, have to be the same line, (or really close to being the same). I guess my real question is what defines the side-to-side line?
Screenshot 126
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Văn Hiếu Võ
Using ellipses to represent circles and ellipses in perspective is only a convenient approximation, hardly 100% accurate. I think a helpful way to think of circles and ellipses in perspective is to consider the squares or rectangles that inscribe them. Then you can use bisectors and diagonals to construct a more convincing ellipse.
Asset 3 20
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Văn Hiếu Võ
What he was referring to as the "side-to-side" line is the "major axis" of the ellipse NOT in perspective. Basically if you draw an ellipse in 2D (x and y), an ellipse has a long axis called "major", and a short axis called "minor". As for the "line perpendicular to the long axis", that would be the "major axis" of the REPRESENTATION of the ellipse in perspective.
Asset 1 20
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Văn Hiếu Võ
Here's my submission. Looking forward to your critique.
pelvis
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Văn Hiếu Võ
Here are my submissions. Looking forward to your critique.
submission
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Văn Hiếu Võ
I'm looking forward to your critiques
gesture practice
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Văn Hiếu Võ
Anything helps. Thanks
20210530 205112
20210530 205211
20210530 205226
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Ferzan Süngütay
@Stan Prokopenko why don't you put subtitles with multiple language options Will those who do not speak English be a market loss? You can transcape videos, just like in your lessons. It is my request for all the videos you have published and all the lessons on the proko site. I will buy accordingly. Please consider it.
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Văn Hiếu Võ
It's a livestream, and it's been barely a day seen it was streamed.
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