Arthur Cardoso
Arthur Cardoso
Brazil
Arthur Cardoso
Done using some oil pastels chalk. Trying those dramatic non-hollywood posters.
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doodles1
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altumvidetur
Michael Mattesi covers this topic in one of his videos: https://youtu.be/3sI3sYitpQs
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Arthur Cardoso
Ohh Thanks!
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Kako
what I do, although I am not an expert, is use the guidelines for eyes, nose, mouth etc, It is important to start with the basic shapes first and then when the proportions are organized you can add the details. keep it up!
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Arthur Cardoso
Thanks, I will definetly do this next time, as well as create more boxes to limit my sizing.
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Joesmith Realname
The serial artists I've followed through life have all had their days of 'misses' where it comes to likenesses of a character over and over and over.....the factor I recall making them most comfortable was to get a model reference ingrained in their heads that, thought it may not have been absolutely spot on perfect with what they were drawing, it did allow them some "anchor points" to land on. The nose was just a "check mark", and the eyes a horizonal line with two black diagonals...etc. That and, well, lots of sketchbook work. Good luck!
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Arthur Cardoso
Thanks :)
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Arthur Cardoso
Nice studies Uku! As you said the first one looks a bit off, specially the forehead shadow, wich is too vertical and straight, as well as the shadow on the neck wich feels unatural maybe because of the "inserstion" you made it in the jaw. The 3rd photo looks fantastic apart from some perspective issues like Steve pointed out, and the ear seems small compared to the rest of the facial features, this can be avoided by drawing a line between the eyebrow and the nose, to place the ear. The 4th photo is also very nice, but the shadow of the cheekbone is pushed too far right, I don't have the reference models you were using but I belive it should be closer left. Keep up the great work!
CC
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Arthur Cardoso
Damn, those are some good studies! I wish I had your determination. All of them are great, even the connections, except the 4th one in the 7th photo, that connection isn't anatomically possible as is too closed together and angled. A more subtle angle and it's already a great fix. Keep up the great work, you are already a great arist!
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Arthur Cardoso
Nice work Pedro! As you said you are testing out some new digital features, so my advice would be to work more on your lines, doing some draftsmenship exercises, since drawing digital can feel very different from drawing on paper. Also the clavicle is too low, it usually sits on the start of the shoulder. Keep up the great work!
clavicle
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Elijah Miessler
Cool work, I think one thing that could help is practicing more with drawing consistently sized boxing turning in perspective, and using a system from someone like George Bridgman or Andrew Loomis may help.
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Arthur Cardoso
Damm I always do boxes to make realistic proportion, and I didn't do it here. Thanks for the help!
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Arthur Cardoso
Hi Brett! Nice stuedies. I can see you exagerating some forms for more intrest and thats cool. For now I think you could simplify your lines to "C" "S" and "I" shapes, making it easier for studying, as I see a lot of edges and points in your drawing. Now if you already feel comfortable with simple gesture you can start applying some indication of anatomical features, such as chest, shoulders, feet etc. Hope I could help, and keep up the good work!
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Yiming Wu
Those are very nice tips! I don't think I have anything to add in terms of photograph, but I think you could sometimes consider scanning, as those A4 flatbed scanners are so cheap these days, you can even get a very decent one for office use that has great colour! Epson photo scanners are great in sharpness and colour (make sure you get the LED one instead of those old florescent ones), I've used two of theirs and they work wonderfully. If you do traditional art a lot, do consider invest a scanner, it will make computer touch-ups a lot easier. I'm currently using an A3 sized one from Epson as I draw bigger now, but the same idea.
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Arthur Cardoso
Hell yeah! Thanks for sharing.
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Arthur Cardoso
Nice study Kako! I feel you coul do a bit more work on your triceps specially the lateral head, it's lines are too sharp and pointy, and the long head is too small and high up. You also seemed to have mistaken part of the pecs with the shoulder, there is a shy line there separating both. You have great gesture, keep up the good work!
triceps
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iuri anastacio
try working the jaw, it is a little off and short man, but your hair got a pretty good design
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Arthur Cardoso
I agree it's off, but I did want the jaw to be small, I want the opposite of a chad here
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Moonless_Sky
Drawing faces is super difficult. I think studying the loomis head concept would help to improve your drawings :)
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Arthur Cardoso
Definetly! I should study more loomis heads
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Arthur Cardoso
I have been browserling for some time, looking at a lot of digital and traditional art, and often times the photo of the traditional doesn't have good quality. Today I would like to share some simple tips to consider when taking a picture of your art to help you share your artwork with others! Note that I can't help you regarding to wich device you use to take a picture. Things to consider when taking a picture: - Are any undesired shadows in my photo of my drawing? If so how can I avoid them? - Is my drawing within frame of the photo? - Using natural light is always better than inside light, (unless you have profession equipment for taking pictures). - If the natural light is too strong be careful with a glow on the blank parts of your paper. - Diferent times of the day have diferent lights so be careful, and choose the right time. - Try as best as you can getting a focused image of your subject. Now let's say you took the perfect photo, but the drawing itself looks a bit diferent from what you see in real life. In this case you can always try and edit your image, be careful not to overedit though! Colors for example can be diferent from what you see in real life, so playing around with colours to reach the result you want is desirable. Or if you have a pencil sketch, and it's not very clear and strong in the photo, you can always crank up the contrast and the darks for more visual clarity. Hope I could help, and I wish you all happing drawing. :)
Arthur Cardoso
This is mindblowing
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Arthur Cardoso
Hi Matt! Do you do any sort of sketching before drawing? With heads is always good to do some Loomis head sketches, and lines wraping around it to define proportions and where the facial features go. Her eyes are too close together, most people have an eye's distance between the 2 eyes, also feel like her right eye is a bit high up. She has a very default face so you could do a rectangular prism to keep the anatomy right. Hope I could help and keep up the good work!
Loomis head
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Arthur Cardoso
Love the expression! I would spent more time in the shadows and core shadows, making them a but more refined, as now the shadows/reflected light are too similiar with the actual light, so it can get confusing. I reccomend Dorian Iten to study shadows from, Proko's video with him: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vapw6n6FyU Keep up the good work!
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Arthur Cardoso
All though Watchmen was made by a big name (DC) the team that made it was very small. The colours are very bright and "neony", but my favourite moments is when there is a tension moment or action where everything has an unatural red tone, adding to the feel of unstableness and danger.
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Arthur Cardoso
Nice work my dude! I like the use of negative space in some panels. It really helps keep a focal point. Nicely written characters as well.
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Arthur Cardoso
Damn dude, seeing your determination is really inspiring. Like training stuff you are not comfortable with is really cool and brave! I would be careful with your proportions of the facial features though. You said it youself that you have a hard time with the nose and mouth. Usually when i have similiar problem I like to create rectangles to limit the size of the features, to keep it realistic. Keep up your work, looking foward to what you do in the future!
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