Alec Brubaker
Alec Brubaker
California
I like to make monstas : )
Alec Brubaker
I agree with the others that the falling pose is a bit stiff. N.C. Wyeth was big on 'acting out' and character he was illustrating to really get a feel for what they would look like doing their thing, and It's a great idea to try it. Really imagine yourself as this guy jumping at this enemy. What would your body be doing? How would the weight be shifting as you fall through the air? Would your weapon be in one hand, or both? And do the same for the orc guy as well! Does he hear a rustling in the trees behind him? Does he smell danger in the air? Acting out the scene like this can really help you channel the nuances into your characters. Aside from that, I'd also suggest that you do a couple iterations of your illustration where you try out different choices on each of the characters' poses, the angle the camera is viewing the scene at, shape of the tree canopy, etc. You could even play with the shape of the canvas, maybe the scene would look cooler if you pushed it vertically or horizontally
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Vengat K B
hi, I have done my best for this portrait. give me sun feedback please .what things I need to focus on.
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Vengat, Joao has some made some great points you should take note of! I'll also say that even before value in importance however, is proper attention to the drawing. Great values can't make up for wrongly placed and proportioned shapes. Be sure to take note of the angles of features in your reference and make sure your understanding them correctly! For instance, her eyes are shooting off at a different angle than her mouth/nose/chin/brow. Take note of the distances between those features as well. The face is typically divided into close 3rds, those being the hairline to the brow ridge, the brow ridge to the bottom of the nose, and the bottom of the nose to the chin. You have her hairline/brow and brow/nose 3rds accurately measured, but have given her a significantly big chin! And that then throws off whe placement and size of her mouth. So always always always make sure you have the placement and proportion of the elements of your drawing correct, even if it takes you several attempts!
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Anubhav, I think the stiffness in the first couple drawings you've posted is coming from some proportion issues. On the first drawing, it looks like you're missing some length on the legs. A rule of thumb for a conventionally well proportioned figure is that the halfway point is the pubic bone right above the crotch. And on the second drawing you're having the opposite issue, this time you've squished the torso into the pelvis, she's missing her waist! The proportions in your last 3 drawings are quite a bit better, and the figures feel less 'stiff' because of that. I consider getting these proportions in a pose down first and foremost, as the figure just won't look correct otherwise. Aside from proportions, you could try looking for more curves in the figure, like in the ribcage, female hip shapes, arms, etc. And paying attention to the angles of tilts of those skeletal landmarks as well! Shoulders, hips, the angle the two feet are planted on. Hope this helps a bit, keep up the good work!
Gesture tips
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CHARLES DEIGHAN
I must admit I'm not a big fan of measuring anything, I'm more of a train your eye guy, but these tips are good to know. Here's my assignment for this week. I used the traditional method.
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Alec Brubaker
Nice Lay-in! Maybe you'll find it more to your liking to try making a measurement with your eye first, and then measure it to double check your accuracy. I personally like to do it that way when doing figure drawing. I think as long as you're really observing and being conscious of where you're putting your lines, whether from measurements or eye-balled, your 'eye' for proportion and placement will improve quickly.
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Cristina Kaiden
I am stuck with beans; how long should I do this practice until I can move on? I have done the lesson twice; and this is the 3rd re-do of the twist section. Short of memorizing the poses; I have a hard time seeing whether the torso or the pelvis is in front. Any feedback would be appreciated. Tia
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Alec Brubaker
I agree with Carole, you should feel free to move on to the next lesson. You can always come back to this exercise if you feel you have more to learn from it later, but it's not something you need to be perfect at in order to move forward.
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Michael Melesse
Here is my tracing assignement
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Group 5
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Alec Brubaker
These look great! Your big shapes are very well done. I do think some of your contour lines/muscle striations feel a little flat in areas where they could be helping to round the form more.
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azzahidi
These are my assignments for pec,,, feed back please, thank you, stay healthy everybody :)
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Alec Brubaker
these look great!
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irahc
My first attempt without watching, i have question, if my first attempt is correct (perspective, form, gesture) but not the exact same line that the instructor drew, do i need to do a second attempt? Or should i do a second attempt regardless? Thank you!!
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Irahc, In my opinion It is always a good idea to do several attempts when you are trying to study. The point of studying is of course to ingrain what you are trying to learn as best you can, and they best way to do that is conscious observation paired with repetition, and then coming up with a way to test your knowledge. I'd suggest you try doing a little drawing from imagination! For example, if your goal is to learn a bit more of the arm skeletal structure, draw those bones a few times from reference while consciously paying attention to the shapes, proportion, etc., and then try to draw a few from imagination and see how much of that information you actually retained. And the goal here isn't to grind one thing until it's perfect. But it is important to make a habit of really spending the time to observe and study the topic at hand and be certain we're learning something, and not just falling into the trap of doing a nice 'copy' and thinking that we studied! Hope this helps a little; keep up the good work!
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veryartthing
Here are some 2 minutes gestures. I've been doing gestures for awhile now but never seem to get any better at them. Not sure what to do. I can individually pick apart each failed gesture to get an idea of where I stumbled, but it seems inconsistent to me. Maybe others can notice some larger trends in my work where I'm falling short?
gesturenew
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Very, I think you've gotten a sense of proportion and movement out of your drawings, which is great. The truth is, a 2 minute window is not great to learn all of the aspects of figure drawing in! think of short quicksketches like this more as a test of what you already know, rather than a dependable way to learn new, nuanced information about the figure. The things that will make your quick sketches more sophisticated will be learned from doing longer drawings, not shorter ones. Spend time doing drawings where you give yourself the time you need to really observe the figure in depth, beyond the idea of gesture. Draw a figure and work on those proportions until they're right, observe and figure out what the major forms are doing, how they're seated in perspective, etc. Things like this that you practice in 20min, 1hr, 3hr, etc. sessions on a single figure drawing are where the significant observation and learning really happens, and you can use short gesture drawings as a way to test that growth!
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Kayla Chu
Heres my attempt for this lessons assignment (drawing simple objects and applying structure to animals). Feedback appreciated!
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Alec Brubaker
These are looking good! I suggest you continue what you're doing here, but build on it by spending some time drawing whatever object from multiple angles, and getting more experience with the idea of 'turning' forms in space. For example, you've drawn that traffic cone from one angle, but what does it look like if you tip it over away from you? Or tip it towards you? Then if you want a real challenge you can try drawing these 'construction models' in different angles from imagination to test your sense of perspective and 3d form. Keep up the good work!
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Alec Brubaker
Nice drawing Mathew, your lines look very confident. If you're trying to get those shadows to pop, take the leap and make them darker! Having that light/dark value contrast is what will give your drawing a sense of part of the form being in light and part of the form being in shadow. As it is now in your drawing, everything feels like it's in light. Of course there can be subtlety in shadow values with things like reflected light(For example in your reference, there is light, core shadow, and parts of the shadow are slightly more illuminated by reflected light from whatever surrounding environment) But more important than that is the idea that we're trying to group lights and shadows to feel separate. A very general rule of thumb, (If you are wanting a strong light/shadow contrast) that you should keep your lightest shadow a darker value than your darkest light. Hope this helps a bit, I look forward to seeing more of your studies!
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Dima Jurf
Asked for help
What do you think of these 2 min gesture drawings? Photo source : New Master Academy / youtube channel and Croquis Cafe.
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Dima, these are very nice gestures! You have some nice overlaps and a good sense for proportion and movement in these. I don't know how many longer figure studies you do, but I think you'll benefit from breaking it up and doing studies with 5, 10, 20+ minute timers. In terms of observation and deep understanding, 2 minutes is a very brief window of time to get down the essence of something as complicated as the human figure in a 'complete' statement. Getting some practice in a format where you have more time to observe and make choices about what is important can help you improve the sophistication of your quick sketches a lot, especially for the poses you may find more difficult. I'm attaching some gesture drawings by Ben Young and Glen Orbik you may find interesting
ben young sketch 1
normal marla qs2
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mikeyschwarzenagger
hello i got an question, what if the robo bean i make is a bit diferent that the one of the xample of the video, because sometime i cant remember the way you do it, my robo is sometime diferent compare the video, is it bad bad to make it diferent, i understand some part, but i mosly mess up in the chest, or mayby not, and mmayby i should not worry if im doing it diferent if it work for me, and i should change if i see it not working for me, i dont khow, i would like to khow for i can move on faster
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Alec Brubaker
Philippe brings up great points. I'd also like to state that you don't have to get any of these exercises 'perfect' before you move on to the next one. It's more a matter of getting some focused practice in on each exercise, trying your best and learning what you can at that stage. But you should always feel free to move on to, or come back to any exercise at any point if you feel that you can get some value out of studying it. Sometimes it turns out that studying a more 'advanced' lesson for a little can actually help you understand a simpler lesson. Good luck!
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Lyena, very nicely done. I think you have a fun idea here, but you could definitely push it farther! In regards to designing for a specific era, It's always a good idea to spend a good deal of time researching the costumes, ornamentation, and other visual elements, which it does look like you've done a bit of. However, I think your design could benefit from a few things, the first being iteration! If you have an idea for a character It is always a good idea to spend time really exploring your options, different takes on what that character could be. Lots of sketches on what this character could look like, before you get to a finished painting! And this is not just in regards to costume, but even things like attitude and body language. Spend some time thinking about this things and pushing the concept of your character. A lot of good designers will ask themselves questions about their character and explore these possibilities in writing. For example, let's brainstorm some possibilities giving ourselves the prompt 'Evil Victorian Witch'. How evil is this witch? And what kind of evil? Is she sadistic? Wicked? Seductive? Does she revel in being evil or is she just ruthless? Is she a sorceress or could she be possessed by a demon? What drives her intentions, her evil actions? Does she want something? Maybe she wants revenge on another person, or to steal political power! Past her intentions, what kind of witch might she be and what does she look like? Your artwork shows her dressed nicely and having face tattoos, which I imagine is quite unusual in Victorian England! Does this cause problems for her in public life?(something to think about!) But maybe those tattoos are temporary, written in the blood of a sacrifice before our witch commits some heinous ritual! Or perhaps we could make her a hag who hides away in the woods, or under a castle. Or is she a member of polite society who hides her malicious intent behind a mask of innocence? Maybe she uses sorcery to change her appearance? Might she have a wardrobe change throughout her character arc in whatever story this is? Perhaps she's a jealous serving girl who ends up a dark queen like Maleficent! Spending time thinking out possibilities in this way is incredibly fun, helpful and will pretty much always lead you to a more interesting and creative design than you might have otherwise had. Here's the link to a video on character design that might interest you, with lots of tips on these exact topics: https://www.proko.com/lesson/level-up-your-character-design-with-knight-zhang/discussions I know It's a wall of text but I hope it helps some, keep up the great work!
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Nick Prescot
I've watched this multiple times now, I do not understand what to do after the laying in the basic shapes. I see you add an ellipse, but that's when I get lost. Is there anyway to explain this better?
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Nick, I'm actually unsure of which ellipse you're talking about in the video, but it's probably Stan blocking in the placement of a form on the nose he's drawing. A very general procedure for drawing goes as follows: 1) Find your big placement and proportions. 2) Draw in the major forms. 3) Draw in secondary forms. 4) Use light and shadow to help define those forms and make them read three-dimensionally. Hope this helps some!
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xenon
Assingment- developing characters.
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Alec Brubaker
Hi Xenon, fun sketches. If you haven't tried it yet, I think you could spend some time writing out ideas to help guide the direction of your designs. These drawings are cool but feel a little random, and might benefit from you thoughtfully guiding the direction of your designs more. I see you have the note 'Pumpkin Head', but is there more to that story? Were they created by a mad scientist? Are they ghosts and ghouls that haunt a location? Do they guard something? Spending time the time to ask yourself questions about what you're designing and consciously explore ideas really helps you make decisions with intention behind them, which is what designing is all about!
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lukeng
Ab assignment drawings. Feedback and critiques are welcome!
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Alec Brubaker
These look excellent!
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Alec Brubaker
awesome episode, those exercises are rally fun.
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Alec Brubaker
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Rubén Frutos
I'm probably late but this is gorgeous!
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Alec Brubaker
Thank you Ruben!
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