Taha Teğin
Taha Teğin
Turkey(Not Animal)
Literature student.
Activity Feed
Steve Lenze
You have a couple of things that you can do. To start with, your characters on the sides are getting taller as they move back in space. This is working against the perspective you have. To make the character feel suffocated by all these people, you could make him a little bigger, causing the others to be closer to him. I did a quick sketch to show you what I mean so that you could see the effect. I hope it helps :)
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Taha Teğin
Didn't even notice such a basic mistake (-_-) Thank you for the advice sir o7
Reply
Taha Teğin
I'll leave the questions right at top for any helpful soul that doesn't want to read too much— I aim to make a suffocating scene, but the numbered spaces on the first attachment seem to prevent and even detract from the desired effect. In light of the third attachment where the 1st numbered figure's enlargment makes the 3rd numbered space seem more 'off', how do I understand whys of this happening? What causes, if there truly is one, the disproportionate feeling? Perspective mistake or use of spacing? For the long explanation: This is a scene of capture. The aim was to make the kneeling figure(somewhat centered) small relative to other figures, and also make him 'suffocated' by the numbers. The view is over the shoulder of one of the pigman blocking his escape. The first attachment is the basic sketch, second is added details and fixed perspective issues, third is the final adjustment. What I feel is, and I think the problems come from the three spaces I numbered on the first attachment, the composition makes the scene 'suffocating' to view, rather than suffocating to the character. I'm not sure if that makes much sense—in another way, the perspective and placement seems to make the numbered spaces pop more than the figures' presence, hence neither the central figure nor the surrounding group seems to be in or out of focus. I intend to make this a painting, with the main light source the kneeling figure(Thinking of a ball of flame from his hidden left hand that pops under the chest), and I think the only thing I can resort to fix this seemingly imaginary 'off'ness is to block out the 3rd numbered figures in shadows or entirely hide them away—which seems lazy :( Again, please do point out if you need any clarification, and thank you still.
Taha Teğin
Thank you Mr. Bucci and everyone else on the tream for the challenge o7
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Taha Teğin
On Krita, I always use Rough Bristles(Wet) and round wet paint(both default brushes)—I like the way rough bristles act like thick oil paint and when you pull the paint away to spread it gives very nice textures when it comes to small forms or highlights. Round wet paint is good for shaping up, though there are other detail brushes that can do it better, But I find it more preferable to get good at two or three brushes than try to use all of them. It can get quite messy. For Clip studio, the default pencils and oil/water color brushes are amazing. Especially pencils when I don't have(like right now) any money to buy the sketchbook for the month. they do the same work with near similar feel. The online downloadable brushes are amazing too, and I use a lot of the watercolor ones for sketching and painting the base colors to get a feel for the overall shape. When it comes to finishing touches, I feel like square brushes are a better option. Round ones for highlights; for anything else like small curves, squeezed forms, reflections, merging light or whatever comes to mind. It just has a better feel, though I can't really put on a finger why.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Hitchcock Hilbert
Hi, Second time I post my art. I delete last image I post. I wanna have one with more abstract color and light also stroks, I Its really fun to open some of my old arts and repaint em make more color and abstract strokes on it. hoppin yall doing this challenge havin fun
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Taha Teğin
I love this
Reply
Taha Teğin
Thanks for the challenge. The reference is an old photograph(from around 60's) of an ironworker manufacturing coffee cups. I took a sample of it on a trip and thought it would do well as a colour attempt.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Taha Teğin
Earthsworld instagram page is amazing for portrait reference. Pixiv is a good one if you like to learn from mostly eastern artists, and Wikicommons is one pretty important source that I see not mentioned. Of course it is harder in WC to find good reference, but if you already have a topic in your head on what to draw then it is a superb source.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Christopher Beaven
The best thing about your painting is that the light and dark sides of the face are clearly separated. That is super important, great job there. The only issue I see with the color of the light side of the face is the saturation. Try bringing the saturation down a bit to match. Also, make sure to compress you values. You don't have to copy exactly from the photo as well. Great job! This makes me want to try some color for the first time in digital.
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Taha Teğin
Thank you for the encouragement and the advice. And yes, I really would recommend trying digital colours even for the fun of it. I do watercolours in traditional most of the time, so the opportunity to do multi-media colouring is a great one and has affected the way I paint watercolor as well(In a good way!)
Reply
Tim Dosé
Generally what you're looking for in skin color is a low-chroma orange. Depending on the person, it will swing a little towards red or yellow and up or down slightly in chroma, but will generally be low-chroma orange. This is true even for darker skin colors. One of the first things to watch for is distinguishing highlights from form lights. Things can be really confusing when you can't tell if a light area is a highlight or a form light. This is one of the main challenges when working from photos—it can be hard to tell what's a highlight. From life it's easy—you just move a bit, and if the light moves with you, it's a highlight. In highlights, the chroma will drop even lower (assuming a white or whiteish light). Highlights usually have a core area that's lighter than the other parts and closer to the color of the light, and a darker transition area that's closer to the value and hue of the object. The chroma of this transition highlight will be higher than the core highlight, but lower than the chroma of the object. The next thing to look for is higher chroma in the lights—but *only with form lights*. Highlights lose chroma as they get lighter. For form lights, more light = more chroma. So, as the form turns away from the light, it will lose chroma slightly as it also loses value. The shadow areas will be even lower chroma. So, the light-most-facing plane (LMFP) will be the highest chroma, and the form shadow will be the lowest chroma (starting at the terminator). Capturing the diminishing of chroma along with the diminishing of light can make things look real and full of light. A good trick is that the area of the form light that is most facing to the light (the light-most-facing plane or LMFP) will usually be right near the highlight. It'll be on the side furthest from the viewer. This will be the highest chroma, but darker in value than the highlight. You ultimately end up with a hierarchy that looks like this: - Light-most-facing plane = highest chroma, third-highest value - Core highlight = lowest chroma, highest value - Transition highlight = second-lowest chroma, second highest value - Form shadow = third-lowest chroma, lowest value I attached some diagrams and a paintover to hopefully help illustrate
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Taha Teğin
Thank you so much for the advice, diagrams and paintover. They help clear up what I don't understand in text.
Reply
@jaffacakes
When it comes to colour I would worry less about trying to copy the exact colours you see in your reference and instead focus on the colours in the context of your canvas. Let me explain: Colours are relative, meaning they will always look different depending on what other colours surround them, for example just plain grey, sat next to blue will appear red/orange-ish, because blue is a 'cool' colour so it makes the grey look 'warm' by comparison. This can make it extremely hard to guess the actual colours that are in you're reference because your eyes will always perceive a different colour to the one that's actually there (unless you managed to isolate that colour and view it somewhere away from all the others). A good solution to this I found was to use 'Gamut Masking' or a 'Limited Pallet', this is a technique in which you select only a handful of colours and use only those colours throughout your whole painting, at first this sounds counter intuitive, but it actually makes the whole process allot easier, because now you've narrowed down your options as to what the colour could be and rather than having to choose from the entire hue chart you only have to pick from a select few... So the question you should be asking yourself when picking a colour shouldn't be 'What is this EXACT colour' and then pain-stakingly trying to get it as accurate as the eyedropper/ Colour picker tool. Instead you should be asking yourself 'how this colour related to the rest of the image'? Is this Warmer or Cooler, Less or more saturated, Darker/Brighter than the colours that are around it. Like I mentioned before, only the colours on your canvas are the ones that matter, if an area in your reference is 50% warmer, more saturated, cooler etc than the area around it, then your painting should show that too, it doesn't matter if its the exact same colour or not, what matters is that its 50% warmer, more saturated, cooler etc in relation to the rest. If there's a spot on your reference that is the warmest part of the whole image then in your painting that should be the warmest part too, the colour can be red, green, blue... it doesn't matter, as long as its the warmest part, it will look correct in the context of the whole painting. Hope that Helps :) I struggled with picking colours for a long time so I've done a ton of research into the subject, here's a couple of the videos that helped me the most, the James gurney video shows an example of the colour relativity thing too. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfE4E5goEIc James Gurney - Gamut Masking https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LhcNbFMkTw Marco Bucci - Colour Harmony
Write reply...
Drop images here to attach them to the message
Taha Teğin
Thank you for sharing wisdom, I'll look through the videos as well.
Reply
Help!
Browse the FAQs or our more detailed Documentation. If you still need help or to contact us for any reason, drop us a line and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible!
Your name
Email
Message