3D Model: The Bucket
3D Model: The Bucket
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Anatomy of the Human Body

Torso(163 Lessons)
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Pelvis

3D Model: The Bucket

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3D Model: The Bucket

1.9K
Stan Prokopenko
3D Model of the The Bucket.
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Sandra Süsser
first I got confused with the orientation of the ovals, but figured it out. Still struggling with the tilted horizon line. This is actually quite a challenge. I like it :D
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Gannon Beck
These are excellent, Sandra!
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John Harper
nice, very nice. Good job.
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angiespice
A few from ref and a few from Imagination. tricky stuff.
Pelvis Intro
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Jesper Axelsson
These look really nice! I wrote a critique last year that I think you'll appreciate reading https://www.proko.com/s/NkCt Hope this helps :) Keep up the good work!
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Johan Kurniawan
I'm having trouble figuring out on how to draw Oval in perspective, a Circle in perspective is an ellipse and I understand the rule but an Oval in perspective? how do you draw them accurately?
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slickdudes
I had this problem too, so I spent a couple days working exclusively on "turning through space" exercises. The goal is to be able to draw the clock face at any angle, made a big improvement on my ovals, before I could only do them at one angle at all. This is just one quick example I pulled up, but try practicing rings and stuff too, VERY helpful. Depending on what medium you use, you can set this up in many ways. I use Krita and I don't think it has a shortcut to make oval tool do perfect circles, to MI turned on grid mode on canvas when I made the circles layer. It's basically just a guide that really helps me work out the shape without having to think if it's in the right place. Then just practice away. Maybe after try without the guide on
clocks
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mameko
Me too, I am also having hard time to draw ovals.
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Victor Sanchez
I was having problems with that too, but then I saw that Proko explains the perspective of the bucket in more detail in the Anatomy Critiques video. It's making more sense to me now.
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James Mayr
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This exercise is hard. Especially when you are drawing the buckets from an unusual angle. I did the exercise traditionally and digitally (mainly because my digital pencil control sucks) The pelvis - even with construction - looks sometimes odd. What I missed / did wrong?
photo 2020 12 22 21 44 57
photo 2020 12 22 21 44 58
photo 2020 12 22 21 44 56
photo 2020 12 22 21 44 59
modeling bucket
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Liandro
@James Mayr, I think pencil control is making a difference in this exercise in your case: the pencil drawings have a much better aspect than the digital ones... it's not only that the digital lines are a bit wobbly, it's mainly because how you're drawing the lines is directly affecting how you're representing the forms: the forms (which are the crucial part of this training) are not looking solid enough because of the line quality. So, if possible, I'd suggest you stick to traditional media for assignments like these, at least until you get a better grip on your digital tool. If you find you really want to keep up with digital practice, one thing you might try is to do a first sketch pass with pencil on paper, then scan it or take a photo of it, take it to the software and use it to draw over your pencil sketch, make adjustments and/or ink it digitally. Depending on the software and device you're using, you look for tools or plug-ins such as Lazy Nezumi to make your lines a bit more stable when you do this digital part. You could even use vector tools, such as Illustrator, to accomplish this ink/development part, since the important thing would be just to have a clear and clean linework (the construction part would have already been made on paper). As for the construction of the Pelvis, the main thing I see is that the proportions of the bucket seem to be a bit too stretched - this makes the whole Pelvis look too long, and can even make the perspective look warped. Before you start to construct the secondary forms of the pelvis, make sure the primary forms (the Bucket) is consistent. Another thing is make sure to add the thickness of the Ischium, both on its border and also inside the two "holes". This is a really tough assignment because it involves a LOT of our sense for perspective - anatomy is almost secondary. Make sure you're really feeling confident with drawing and visualizing basic cylinders in perspective, this is really what will get you to make the cut in this exercise. If you feel you're still struggling with the basic forms in perspective, maybe take a bit of time to practice just the fundamentals of form and perspective, then go back to the anatomy exercise and notice how much difference it makes. Truly hope this helps! Let me know if there's anything else.
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James Mayr
What a valuable exercise: Practicing Anatomy, Ellipse drawing and perspective at the same time! I did the excercise traditionally and digital. (traditionally to get the concept and construction, digitally to improve my digital drawing skills.)
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buckets
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Founder of Proko, artist and teacher of drawing, painting, and anatomy. I try to make my lessons fun and ultra packed with information.